Canada’s most walkable cities for 2014

Source: livingstreetsalliance.org

Source: livingstreetsalliance.org

As ranked by walkscore.com, below is the list of those larger Canadian cities with an average walk score of 50 or greater. Here is a breakdown of what each city’s average score represents:

  • 90-100 = Walker’s Paradise - daily errands do not require a car
  • 70-89 = Very Walkable – most errands can be accomplished on foot
  • 50-69 = Somewhat Walkable – some errands can be accompished on foot
  • 25-49 = Car Dependent – most errand require a car
  • 0-24 = Car Dependent – most errands require a car
Source: vancouver.ca

Source: vancouver.ca

As is evident from the data below, the Vancouver area scores particularly strong, though some of the more distant suburbs like Chilliwack (39), Langley (39), and Maple Ridge (36) still score poorly. Congratulations to each city that attained a score of 50 or more. Other cities that nearly missed making the list include Kingston (49), Quebec City (49), Vaughn (49), Windsor (49), Calgary (48), Brampton (48), and Brandon (48).

  • Vancouver, British Columbia = 78
  • Victoria, British Columbia = 78
  • North Vancouver, British Columbia = 73
  • Toronto, Ontario = 71
  • Halifax, Nova Scotia = 70
  • Montreal, Quebec = 70
  • New Westminster, British Columbia = 70
  • Burnaby, British Columbia = 64
  • Mississauga, Ontario = 59
  • Longueuil, Quebec = 56
  • Yellowknife, Northwest Territories = 56
  • Richmond, British Columbia = 55
  • Burlington, Ontario = 54
  • Ottawa Ontario = 54
  • Coquitlam, British Columbia = 53
  • Winnipeg, Manitoba = 53
  • Delta, British Columbia = 52
  • St. Catharines, Ontario = 52
  • Saskatoon, Saskatchewan = 52
  • Edmonton, Alberta = 51
  • Hamilton, Ontario = 51
  • Oakville, Ontario = 51
  • Oshawa, Ontario = 51
  • Surrey, British Columbia = 51
  • Newmarket, Ontario = 50
  • Regina, Saskatchewan = 50
  • Richmond Hill, Ontario = 50

SOURCE: walkscore.com

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This entry was posted in Active transportation, Advocacy, Canada, Cars, cities, climate change, commerce, culture, downtown, environment, fitness, geography, health, hiking, humanity, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, North America, placemaking, planning, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, sustainability, third places, tourism, transit, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking, zoning and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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