Hey, Kohl’s – how about a bike rack?

unnamedRode my new Trek Allant to the local Kohl’s store this morning. I ended up parking and locking it inside the vestibule, as there are no bike racks and not even any signs near the entrance to park my bike safely. Of course they have cigarette disposal units near each entrance for the unhealthy set, and they kept broadcasting how green and environmentally conscious they are on their intercom system, but not a single bike rack to be found. Only acres of asphalt and concrete.

I have been trying to persuade the store to add bike racks ever since it opened approximately 8-10 years ago.  I have spoken to staff, written emails, and left customer comment cards – so far without any success. This despite the documented evidence showing bicycling is good for business.

So here’s my new tactic – broadcasting how much I spent in their store as a bike riding customer in hopes to shame them into action. So Kohl’s – I spent $140.00 at your store this morning – do you think you could afford a bike rack or two now?

Great seaports from space – North America’s Pacific Coast

Here are some great satellite images from Honolulu, Hawaii; Long Beach, California; Los Angeles, California; Mazatlan, Mexico, Oakland California; Tacoma, Washington; and Vancouver, British Columbia. Enjoy!

Honolulu and Pearl Harbor, HA - Source:

Honolulu and Pearl Harbor, HA – Source: commons.wikimedia.org

Long Beach, CA - Source: en.wikipedia.org

Long Beach, CA – Source: en.wikipedia.org

Los Angeles, CA - Source:

Los Angeles, CA – Source: en.wikipedia.org

Mazatlan, Mexico - Source: mazatlantoday.com

Mazatlan, Mexico – Source: mazatlantoday.com

Oakland, CA - Source:

Oakland, CA – Source: unknown

Tacoma, WA - Source: aeerialarchives.com

Tacoma, WA – Source: aeerialarchives.com

Vancouver, BC - Source:

Vancouver, BC – Source: urbanlifesigns.blogspot.com

How about insurance incentives for bicycling?

Source: usastreetsblog.org

Source: usastreetsblog.org

Among my many ponderings about cycling and bike commuting, one topic that bugs me on a semi-annual basis is why I am not eligible to get a lower auto insurance rate for commuting to/from work so often by bicycle? In calendar year 2013, I bike commuted 73 times to work or 33% of the time, while in 2012 my bike commutes accounted for 40% (or 87) of my work commutes. Given the greatly reduced time, mileage, and wear/tear on the car as a result of bicycling to and from work, why don’t I qualify for some sort of discount from my auto insurer? Yes, I have asked them in the past.

The same holds true for health insurance. Shouldn’t those of us who practice a healthier lifestyle be rewarded with lower rates or some sort of discount? It would be one thing to only ride now and then to work, but when it equates to 20 percent or more of your total commutes, there should be an “x” factor built into the actuarial tables which rewards those who cycle to and fro. Granted, some type of substantive proof would be necessary, but a notarized document from an employer could suffice. The HR Department where I work certainly is aware of my bike commuting.

It seems to me, if there were a 5% or 10% discount on auto insurance rates for being a consistent bike commuter, overall ridership and safety produced from the corresponding increase in cyclists would be beneficial to all. Growth in ridership would also contribute to improved health and fitness in the community, which should drive down health care expenditures, which should (in a perfect world) lead to lower health insurance rates.

There may be some examples of discounts already being offered here and there around the country, but it is hardly universal and certainly is not marketed extensively like good driver, good student, multi-policy, and other available discounts. To me, it is long past time for the insurance industry to shift gears and start pedaling some innovative and new ideas for those of us in the cycling community. If it does not embrace such an approach, then perhaps state regulators should consider requiring such an option be made available.

Are they insane?

Source: freep.com

Source: freep.com

Who in their right mind would “plan” to store radioactive nuclear waste within one mile of 20% of the world’s freshwater supply? Apparently, there are some people in Canada who think that’s a sane notion.

This storage facility would be situated across Lake Huron from Detroit’s freshwater intake location and upstream from Toledo, Cleveland, Erie, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Hamilton, Toronto, Oshawa, Kingston, Montreal, and Quebec City. Even the most minuscule error could taint the drinking water for all these urban centers for decades.  Doesn’t anyone recall what happened earlier this year in Charleston, West Virginia when a non-radioactive chemical pollutant that got into that city’s water supply?

Source: mnn.com

Source: mnn.com

This has to be the stupidest idea ever put forth since the dawn of time. Given the geographic enormity of Canada, why doe this have to be located in such a vulnerable location.

One would hope the regulatory bodies in Canada would toss the idea aside as ludicrous, but in today’s money-centric world, who the hell knows? If you are opposed to this insane plan, please speak up and quickly! Here are some pertinent organizations:

 

 

 

Graceful Danish bicycle bridges

Canal Bridges in Copenhagen - Source: copenhagenize.com

Canal Bridges in Copenhagen – Source: copenhagenize.com

Above and below are both photographs and/or artist’s renderings of some of the graceful and stylish bicycle bridges that can be found in Denmark. While these bridges may not have the dynamic boldness of those posted previously from the Netherlands, they are sleek, artistic, handsome, and functional in their own right. Particularly likable is the way these bridges fit aesthetically into their surroundings without being overpowering. Enjoy!

Brygge Bridge in Copenhagen - Source: kimbach.org

Brygge Bridge in Copenhagen – Source: kimbach.org

20110930_120352_Bro_over_Inderhaven_2_1200x695-1

Inderhavns (retractable) Bridge in Copenhagen – Source: dak.dk

Abuen Bridge in copenhagen - Source: demotix.com

Abuen Bridge in Copenhagen – Source: demotix.com

8946188908_94003882f3_z

Cable-stayed bridge under development in Odense – Source: cycling-embassy.dk

woven_bridge_copenhagen_m270312_1

Woven Bridge in Copenhagen – Source mlrp.dk

 

A cut above – Detroit’s Dequindre Cut

Source: smithgroupjjr.com

Source: smithgroupjjr.com

For those out there that think Detroit’s a lost cause, the magnificent Dequindre Cut Greenway is an example of why you are wrong. Constructed along an abandoned below-grade rail corridor, the 1.35 mile greenway links some of Detroit’s coolest features – including the scenic 2.5 mile long RiverWalk, the vibrant Eastern Market, and the trendy Villages. Combine those with a world-class greenway for cyclists and pedestrians and some seriously hip graffiti artwork and you have the recipe for a Midwestern version of New York City’s High Line or Atlanta’s Belt Line.

Source: streetsblog.org

Source: streetsblog.org

Kudos to all those individuals and organizations involved in making the Dequindre Cut a post-industrial success story that truly is “a cut above” most other nonmotorized trails.

Source: freep.com

Source: freep.com

 

 

Great seaports from space – Oceania

Adelaide, Australia - Source:

Adelaide, Australia – Source: flindersports.com.au

Auckland, New Zealand - commons.wikimedia.org

Auckland, New Zealand – commons.wikimedia.org

Hobart, Tasmania - Source: macquariepoint.com

Hobart, Tasmania – Source: macquariepoint.com

Melbourne, Australia - Source:

Melbourne, Australia – Source: satairtime.com

Sydney, Australia - Source:

Sydney, Australia – Source: azosensors.com

Wellington, New Zealand - Source: if-9.de

Wellington, New Zealand – Source: if-9.de

PortMiami Tunnel to open in May

Source: youtube.com

Source: youtube.com

The twin-tube 4,200 foot long PortMiami Tunnel is scheduled to open to traffic in May of 2014. Under construction since 2010, the $1 billion public-private partnership project will extend Interstate 395 under the Government Cut shipping channel separating Watson Island and Dodge Island thus linking the Port of Miami (a.k.a. PortMiami) with the city’s mainland highway network.

Source: portofmiamitunnel.com

Source: portofmiamitunnel.com

The highway tunnel is designed to provide a continuous fixed link (rather than a drawbridge) which allows port related traffic, including heavy truck traffic and cruise-related traffic, to avoid clogging downtown Miami streets. In 2013, Miami saw more than four million passengers pass through its cruise ship terminals, which makes it the busiest cruise port in the world.

Source: gzconsultants.com

Source: gzconsultants.com

 

Great seaports from space – East Asia

Some of the best seaport images yet, come from East Asia. Enjoy!

Inchon, South Korea - Source:

Incheon, South Korea – Source: ark.co.kr

Kaohsiung, Taiwan - Source: reocities.com

Kaohsiung, Taiwan – Source: reocities.com

Kobe, Japan - Source:

Kobe, Japan – Source: eorc.jaxa.jp

Tainjin, China - Source: chinadaily.com.cn

Tainjin, China – Source: chinadaily.com.cn

Tokyo, Japan - Source:

Tokyo, Japan (great view of Haneda International Airport too) – Source: eoearth.org

Vladivostok, Russia - Source: earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Vladivostok, Russia – Source: earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Eleven planning lessons from Boston/Cambridge

Dowtown Boston

Downtown Boston from Cambridge

I had the opportunity to visit Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts in mid-March. Here is a list of eleven planning-related lessons I took away from visiting these two dynamic cities.

  • Preserve, protect and celebrate your community’s history.
  • A varied blend of historic structures and new edifices is visually intoxicating.
  • Savor and build upon the benefits derived from being home to institutions of higher education.
  • Cultural diversity and inclusiveness makes a community much more vibrant.
  • Accessible mass transit and bike sharing systems are wonderful things.
  • Denser urban development can be softened by rich and varied public spaces.
  • The removal of an ugly freeway can reawaken once forlorn areas.
  • The heart of the city can be a great place to raise a family.
  • Pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, and cars can successfully and safely coexist.
  • A thriving city requires thriving neighborhoods – you cannot have one without the other.
  • A compact and walkable urban core is far more preferable to a sprawling mess.