Mexico’s busiest commercial airports in 2015


Winning design for new Mexico City airport - Source: fosterandpartners.com

Gorgeous winning design for the new Mexico City airport terminal – Source: fosterandpartners.com

Below is a list of the 50 busiest commercial airports in Mexico in 2015 as ranked by total passengers. As can be seen from the image above, Mexico City is in the process of developing a gorgeous new international airport. fyi – No truth in the rumor that Under Armour has already bought the naming rights (just kidding).

  1. Mexico City = 38,430,494 total passengers
  2. Cancun = 19,596,485
  3. Guadalajara = 9,758,516
  4. Monterrey = 8,461,917
  5. Tijuana = 4,853,797
  6. San Jose del Cabo = 3,523,010
  7. Puerto Vallarta = 3,517,801
  8. Merida = 1,663,616
  9. Leon = 1,472,811
  10. Culiacan = 1,432,315
  11. Hermosillo = 1,309,763
  12. Villahermosa = 1,273,140
  13. Veracruz = 1,249,914
  14. Tuxtla Gutiérrez = 1,121,332
  15. Chihuahua = 1,110,513
  16. Toluca = 865,037
  17. Ciudad Juarez = 863,760
  18. Mazatlan = 853,409
  19. Tampico = 763,744
  20. Acapulco = 730,382
  21. Oaxaca = 663,187
  22. La Paz = 623,475
  23. Ciudad del Carmen = 623,154
  24. Aguascalientes = 621,008
  25. Huatulco = 618,767
  26. Mexicali = 586,396
  27. Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo = 562,099
  28. Torreon = 556,449
  29. Cozumel = 553,776
  30. Reynosa = 507,186
  31. Queretaro = 503,276
  32. Morelia = 467,297
  33. San Luis Potosi = 444,469
  34. Puebla = 327,811
  35. Zacatecas = 320,065
  36. Durango = 325,853
  37. Tapachula = 265,670 * (fastest growth rate in 2015 0f over 51%)
  38. Minatitlán/Coatzacoalcos = 256,431
  39. Ciudad Obregon = 245,492
  40. Los Mochis = 235,323
  41. Puerto Escondido = 195,330
  42. Campeche = 181,751
  43. Chetumal = 179,377
  44. Manzanillo = 169,465
  45. Colima = 113,583
  46. Tepic = 113,043
  47. Uruapan = 110,067
  48. Matamoros = 97,654
  49. Ciudad Victoria = 75,156
  50. Nuevo Laredo = 72,978

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_busiest_airports_in_Mexico

Posted in aerospace, air travel, airport planning, airports, architecture, aviation, geography, logistics, Mexico, planning, tourism, Trade, transportation, Travel | Leave a comment

Longest turnpikes and tollways in North America


Source: en.wikipedia.org

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Below is a list of the longest tollways in North America based on the following criteria:

  • Minimum distance of 40 miles
  • At least a portion be four lanes
  • Limited access

A guide for abbreviations of provinces or countries is provided for ease of use of the tollway list. Any additions, updates, or corrections are most welcome.

  • CR = Costa Rica
  • DR = Dominican Republic
  • JM = Jamaica
  • MX = Mexico
  • ON = Ontario
  • PR = Puerto Rico
  • There are four toll roads in Panama, but none reach the 40 miles length threshold.
  • Those toll roads shown in italics the author has driven/ridden on.

Source: commons.wikimedia.org

Source: commons.wikimedia.org

_______

  1.  New York State Thruway (NY) = 496.0 miles
  2. Pennsylvania Turnpike (PA) = 359.6 miles
  3. Autopista Estación Don – Nogales (MX) = 291.1 miles
  4. Ohio Turnpike (OH) = 241.3 miles
  5. Florida Turnpike (FL) = 265.0 miles
  6. Kansas Turnpike (KS ) = 236.0 miles
  7. Autopista Maravatío-Zapotlanejo (MX) = 192.4 miles
  8. Garden State Parkway (NJ) = 172.4 miles
  9. Autopista Cuenevaca-Acapulco (MX) = 163.2
  10. Indiana Toll Road (IN) = 156.3 miles
  11. Autopista Amozoc-Perote-Xalapa-Cardel (MX) = 152.2 miles
  12. Autopista  Mérida-Cancún (MX) = 150 miles
  13. Autopista Tepic-Mazatlan (MX) = 147.9 miles
  14. Autopista La Tinaja-Cosoleacaque (MX) = 141.7 miles
  15. Autopista Arco Norte (MX) = 138.6
  16. Massachusetts Turnpike (MA) = 138.1 miles
  17. New Jersey Turnpike (NJ) = 122.4 miles
  18. Highway 407 (ON) = 120.3 miles
  19. Autopista  Mazatlán-Culiacán (MX) = 112.8 miles
  20. PA Turnpike NE Extension (PA) = 112.0 miles
  21. Heartland Parkway (FL-proposed) = 110.0 miles
  22. Autopista México-Querétaro (MX) = 109 miles
  23. Maine Turnpike (ME) = 107.0 miles
  24. Indian Nation Turnpike (OK) = 105.2 miles
  25. Autopista Guadalajara-Tepic (MX) = 104.8 miles
  26. Reagan Memorial Tollway (IL) = 98.0 miles
  27. West Virginia Turnpike (WV) = 95.5 miles
  28. Autopista Gómez Palacio-Corralitos (MX) = 94.0 miles
  29. Highway 2000 (JM) = 93.0 miles
  30. Sam Houston Tollway (TX) = 91.0 miles
  31. Autopista Guadalajara-Colima (MX) = 90.7 miles
  32. Will Rogers Turnpike (OK) = 88.5 miles
  33. Turner Turnpike (OK) = 88.0 miles
  34. Bailey Turnpike (OK) = 86.4 miles
  35. Texas 130 Tollway (TX) = 86.0 miles
  36. Alligator Alley/Everglades Parkway (FL) = 83.9 miles
  37. Autopista  Cadereyta-Reynosa (MX) = 82.0 miles
  38. Tri-State Tollway (IL) = 78 miles
  39. Autopista Monterrey-Nuevo Laredo (MX) = 76.5 miles
  40. Addams Memorial Tollway (IL) = 76 miles
  41. Autopista  Zapotlanejo-Lagos de Moreno (MX) = 73.6 miles
  42. Autopista Yerbanís-Gómez Palacio (MX) = 72.7 miles
  43. Autopista Torreón-Saltillo (MX) = 71.5 miles
  44. Autopista México-Puebla (MX) = 68.9 miles
  45. Autopista 52 (Puerto Rico) = 67.1 miles
  46. Cimarron Turnpike (OK) = 67.0 miles
  47. Autopista Durango-Yerbanís (MX) = 65.4 miles
  48. Autopista Querétaro-Irapuato (MX) = 65.1 miles
  49. Autopista DR-7  (DR) = 65 miles
  50. Autopista León-Lagos-Aguascalientes (MX) = 64.5 miles
  51. Autopista Cordoba-Veracruz (MX) = 60.9 miles
  52. Autopista Acatzingo-Ciudad Mendoza (MX) = 59.4 miles
  53. Auropista 53 (PR) = 59.0 miles
  54. Autopista Tijuana-Ensenada (MX) = 55.6 miles
  55. Suncoast Parkway (FL) = 54.7 miles
  56. Central Florida Greenway (FL) = 54.0 miles
  57. Autopista El Sueco-Villa Ahumada (MX) = 53.9 miles
  58. Beachline Expressway (FL) = 53.5 miles
  59. Muskogee Turnpike (OK) = 53.1 miles
  60. Grand Parkway (TX) = 52.8 miles
  61. Autopista 22 (PR) = 52.2 miles
  62. Autopista Próspero Fernández (CR) = 52.1 miles
  63. Mon-Fayette Tollway (PA) = 52.0 miles
  64. Pres. George Bush Turnpike (TX) = 51.5 miles
  65. Korean Veterans Tollway (DE) = 51.0 miles
  66. Autopista Mexicali-La Rumorosa (MX) = 49.1 miles
  67. Florida Turnpike Extension (FL) = 47.9 miles
  68. Autopista Mexicali-San Luis Rio Colorado (MX) = 47.8 miles
  69. E-470 (CO) = 47.0 miles
  70. Autopista Tepic-Villa Unión (MX) = 46.8 miles
  71. First Coast Tollway (FL-planned) = 46.5 miles
  72. Autopista Santa Ana-Altar (MX) = 45.4 miles
  73. Atlantic City Expressway (NJ) = 44.2 miles
  74. Autopista Jiménez-Camargo (MX) = 43.5 miles
  75. Autopista Camargo-Delicias (MX) = 40.4 miles

Sources:

Posted in Canada, Cars, cities, commerce, Communications, economic development, environment, geography | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Dalai Lama quote


“On this International Day of Peace, we must remember that peace cannot come from prayer alone. It requires action.”

– Dalai Lama 

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When two city names are better than one


Source: skagitmotel.com

In recent years there was an effort to merge the communities of Saugatuck and Douglas in southwest Michigan. While this vote failed, there are 14 successful examples across the country. These are listed below.  

  • Sedro-Woolley, Washington (1898)
  • Winston-Salem, North Carolina (1913)
  • Dover-Foxcroft, Maine (1922)
  • Milton-Freewater, Oregon (1951)
  • Pico Rivera, California (1958) merger of two distinct unincorporated areas into one city.
  • Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina (1963)
  • Soddy-Daisy, Tennessee, (1969)
  • La Cañada Flintridge, California (1976) merger of two distinct unincorporated areas into one city.
  • Little River-Academy, Texas (1980)
  • Melcher-Dallas, Iowa (1986)
  • Leo-Cedarville, Indiana (1996)  
  • Norwood Young America, Minnesota (1997)
  • Elko New Market, Minnesota (2006) 
  • Helena-West Helena, Arkansas (2006) 

Source: en.wikipedia.org and personal knowledge
The reasons for such mergers can vary – in some cases it was to streamline services or cut costs. In other cases was to fend of off annexation, while in others it was a natural and logical combination as the communities were so interwoven economically and geographically. As government purse stings become tighter, additional examples may occur from time to time. In fact, it was quite surprising not to see any mergers since 2006 given the Great Recession that began in 2008 and continue for several years after that in many parts of the country.

Any additions or corrections are welcome. The list is not meant to include county mergers with cities. 

Posted in branding, cities, geography, government | Tagged | Leave a comment

Largest single-structure airport parking garages in the USA/Canada


Seattle - Source: imspatial.wordpress.com

Seattle – Source: imspatial.wordpress.com

The following list identifies the largest single-structure parking garages/decks at airports in the United States and Canada. The rankings are based on the number of parking spaces and include public parking and/or rental car parking spaces. Most of the airports listed have multiple parking facilities on and off site, but these represent the largest individual multi-level parking structures. Data regarding parking structures Canadian airports was/is difficult to find, so only Toronto Pearson International Airport is listed at this time. As always, any additions and/or corrections are welcome.

Abbreviations:

  • CONRAC – consolidated rent-a-car (or rental car) facility
  • UC – under construction
    Data includes public parking and rental car parking garages – minimum 4,000 spaces, whether built at one time such as the Detroit McNamara Parking Garage or over time with additions and expansions. The parking garage must be a single structure.
  1. Seattle-Tacoma International (rental/public) = 13,000 spaces
  2. Detroit Metropolitan Airport (McNamara) = 11,500 spaces
  3. Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (CONRAC) = 10,000 spaces
  4. Chicago O’Hare International Airport (Main) = 9,266 spaces
  5. Milwaukee General Mitchell International Airport – 9,000 spaces
  6. Toronto Pearson International Airport = 9,000 spaces
  7. Denver International Airport (E) = 8,795 spaces
  8. Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport (CONRAC) = 8,700 spaces
  9. Baltimore-Washington International Airport (Daily) = 8,400 spaces
  10. Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (Terminal D) = 8,100 spaces
  11. Tampa International Airport (Economy) = 8,043 spaces
  12. Boston Logan International Airport (Central) = 7,900 spaces
  13. Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (Terminal A) = 7,793 spaces
  14. Charlotte Douglas International Airport (rental/public) = 7,700 spaces
  15. Tampa International Airport (Temporary) = 7,635 spaces
  16. Orlando International Airport (North) = 7,350 spaces
  17. Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (CONRAC) = 7,200 spaces
  18. Indianapolis International Airport (rental/public) =  7,100 spaces
  19. Denver International Airport(W) = 7,000 spaces
  20. Newark Liberty International Airport (proposed) = 7,000 spaces
  21. Chicago O’Hare International Airport (rental/public – UC) = 6,800 spaces
  22. Miami International Airport (CONRAC) = 6,500 spaces
  23. Chicago Midway Airport (Economy) = 6,300 spaces
  24. Raleigh-Durham International Airport = 6,200 spaces
  25. Atlanta Hartfield International Airport (UC) = 6,000 spaces
  26. Las Vegas McCarran International Airport (T3) = 6,000 spaces
  27. Detroit Metropolitan Airport (North/Blue) = 5,500 spaces
  28. San Diego Lindbergh International Airport (CONRAC) = 5,400 spaces
  29. Sacramento International Airport (Terminal A) = 5,326 spaces
  30. Baltimore-Washington International Airport = 5,300 spaces
  31. Washington Reagan National Airport (Terminal B/C) = 5,223 spaces
  32. San Antonio International Airport (Long Term) = 5,188 spaces
  33. Dallas Love Field (new – UC) = 5,130 spaces
  34. Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (Terminal 1 – UC) = 5,000 spaces
  35. Orlando International Airport (South – proposed) = 5,000 spaces
  36. Grand Rapids Gerald Ford International Airport = 4,800 spaces
  37. Washington Dulles International Airport (Garage 1) = 4,650 spaces
  38. Madison Dane County Regional Airport = 4,465 spaces
  39. Louisville International Airport = 4,304 spaces
  40. Dallas Love Field (B) = 4,006 spaces
  41. Boston Logan International Airport (CONRAC) = 4,000 spaces
en.wikipedia.org
businesswire.com
Individual airport websites
Posted in aerospace, air travel, airport planning, airports, architecture, aviation, Canada, Cars, cities, geography, infrastructure, land use, North America, planning, spatial design, Statistics, tourism, traffic, transportation, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Birthplace geography of iconic pop/soda/cola brands


Source: pinterest.com

Source: pinterest.com

The following list identifies well-known soft drink brands (pops, sodas, and colas) from across much of North America. The criteria for inclusion in the list includes:

  • Founded a minimum of 40 years ago – Vernor’s leading the way at 150 years old!
  • Founded as an independent entity (not an offshoot of another brand/corporation).
  • Remain in business today.
  • Date of founding is based on the original product, not offshoots or subsidiaries.

A link is also provided here to a Zee Map showing the geographical distribution of these brands across the continent. The map is color coded to show how certain types of soft drinks are regional in nature. Root beer is particularly obvious (shown in brown), as all iconic root beer brands are from a swath of Middle America except Barq’s which began in New Orleans. Colas (red) tend to have begun the American South and not surprisingly, citrus-flavored drinks (shown in dark yellow) tend to have begun in warmer and/or tropical climates. Lastly, with the exception of Shasta, all ginger ale brands were founded in the Eastern United States and Canada.

Several cities are home to multiple brands (Detroit, New Orleans, and St. Louis). Clicking on the first icon for these cities allows one to scroll through the other ones founded there.

Source: detroithistorical.org

Source: detroithistorical.org

As usual, any additions or corrections are welcome. For those wondering why Nehi is not included, the reason is that Nehi was started by Royal Crown (then Chero-Cola) in 1924, so it was not an independent company/product. Enjoy!

  • Ale-8-One – Winchester, Kentucky (1926)
  • A-Treat – Allentown, Pennsylvania (1918)
  • A & W Root Beer – Lodi, California (1919)
  • Barq’s Root Beer – New Orleans, Louisiana (1898)
  • Blenheim Ginger Ale – Hamer, South Carolina (1903)
  • Bubble Up – Sandusky, Ohio (1919)
  • Canada Dry Ginger Ale – Enniskillen, Ontario, Canada (1904)
  • Cheerwine – Salisbury, NC (1917)
  • Choc-Ola – Indianapolis, Indiana (1944)
  • Coca-Cola – Atlanta, Georgia (1886)
  • Crush – California (1916)
  • Dad’s Root Beer – Chicago, Illinois (1937)
  • Dr. Brown’s – New York City, New York (1869)
  • Dr. Pepper – Waco, Texas (1885)
  • Escuis – Tampico, Mexico (1912)
  • Faygo – Detroit, Michigan (1907)
  • Fitz’s Root Beer – Richmond Hts, Missouri (1947)
  • Foxon Park – East Hartford, Connecticut (1922)
  • Frostie Root Beer – Catonsville, MD (1939)
  • Frostop – Springfield, OH (1926)
  • Grapico – New Orleans, LA (1914)
  • Hires Root Beer – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1876)
  • IBC Root Beer – St. Louis, Missouri (1919)
  • Jarritos – Mexico City, Mexico (1950)
  • Mountain Dew – Knoxville, Tennessee (1940)
  • Moxie – Lowell, Massachusetts (1876) Thank you, John Henry!
  • Mug Root Beer – San Francisco, California (1940)
  • Pepsi – New Bern, North Carolina (1893)
  • Polar – Worcester, Massachusetts (1882)
  • Royal Crown Cola – Columbus, Georgia (1905)
  • Seven-Up – St. Louis, Missouri (1929)
  • Shasta – Mt. Shasta California (1889 – first soft drink in 1931)
  • Squirt – Phoenix, Arizona (1938)
  • Stewart’s Root Beer – Mansfield, OH (1924)
  • SunDrop – New Haven, MO (1949)
  • Sussex – Sussex, New Brunswick, Canada (ca 1900)
  • Ting – Jamaica (1976)
  • Towne Club – Detroit, MI (mid-1960s)
  • Vernor’s – Detroit, Michigan (1866)
  • White Rock – Waukesha, WI (1871)

Sources: personal knowledge and en.wikipedia.org

Posted in advertising, branding, Canada, commerce, consumerism, culture, economic development, economic gardening, Food, fun, geography, history, Maps, marketing, Mexico, North America, product design, States, Statistics | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Faded orange rooftops


Source: pinterest.com

Tomorrow, September 6th the next to last Howard Johnson’s restaurant in the United States, located in Bangor, Maine will be closing. This leaves but one Howard Johnson’s Restaurant in the country – in Lake George, New York.

To this baby boomer, such a inauspicious ending is hardly fitting for one of the most iconic restaurant names in American history – a restaurant chain that Mel Brooks immotalized in the film Blazing Saddles. For a kid growing up in the 60s, Howard Johnson’s was the place to eat while traveling. Twenty-eight yummy ice cream choices and a menu geared towards families with children always topped the standard fare found at most other hotel restaurants of the era. 

Source: openculture.com

My brother and I would also invariably vote for Hojo’s when visiting our grandparents in Speedway, Indiana. The delicious memories of a grilled cheese sandwich for each of us and vanilla shake for me and chocolate one for him. Those were the days! 

Below is a short poem about my personal memories of Howard Johnson’s Restaurants – which will always be sweet. Enjoy!

Faded Orange Rooftops

Once a stalwart of the highway

dotting turnpikes nationwide

now a fading memory

of an era that slowly died


Bright orange rooftops

turquoise highlights below

wooden panel interiors

greeted travelers on the go


A chef serving hotcakes

adorned its bright-lit sign

but those iconic rooftops

were their namesake design


Counter seats to the right

where action ebbed and flowed

booths or tables to the left

for those weary from the road


Twenty-eight sweet flavors 

of frosty cream delights 

awaited those young and old

while visiting tourist sights 


A memory of my childhood

from not that long ago

now passing into history

like a closed portfolio


Thank you Howard Johnson’s 

you were awesome in your prime

where grilled cheese and a shake 

were something quite sublime.

Rick Brown – 2016

Posted in branding, cities, consumerism, culture, geography | Leave a comment