Ranking the longest cable-stayed bridge for each state

 

Gordie Howe International Bridge – Source: enr.com

Below are the rankings of the longest cable-stayed bridge in each state as measured by the main span(s) of the bridge, as of March 6. 2021. Ties are included, so some states may appear more than once as a result. When a bridge crosses state lines, both states are included, unless there is another cable-stayed bridge which is longer for one of the states. Those bridges shown in italics, the author has traveled across

Any additions, corrections, or suggestions are most welcome.

  1. Michigan (Detroit): Gordie Howe International Bridge (2024) = 2,799′ main span

2. Texas (Corpus Christi): New Harbor Bridge (2021) = 1,661′ main span

Corpus Christi’s New Harbor Bridge compared to the former – Source: ccbiznews.com

3. Louisiana (St. Francisville): John James Audubon Bridge (2011) = 1,583′ main span

4. South Carolina (Charleston): Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge (2005) = 1,546′ main span

5. tie – Missouri (St. Louis)/Illinois (East St. Louis): Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge (2104)  and Arkansas (Arkansas City)/Mississippi (Benoit): Charles W. Dean Bridge (proposed) = 1,500′ main span

7. Florida (Jacksonville): Dames Point Bridge (1989) = 1,300′ main span

8. Georgia (Brunswick): Sidney Lanier Bridge (2003) = 1,250′ main span

9. – 3-way tie- Indiana (Jeffersonville)/Kentucky (Louisville): Lewis and Clark Bridge (2016); Indiana (Rockport)/Kentucky (Owensboro): William H. Natcher Bridge (2002); and New York (Tarrytown): New Tappan Zee Bridge (2017) = 1,200′ main span

12. Maine (Bucksport): Penobscot Narrows Bridge (2006) = 1,161′ main span

13. Pennsylvania (North Versailles): New Monongahela River Bridge (proposed) = 1,120′ main span

14. Ohio (Maysville): William H. Harsha Bridge (2000) = 1,050′ main span

15. California (Long Beach): Gerald Desmond Bridge (2020) = 1,003′ main span

16. Washington (Tri-Cities): Ed Hendler Intercity Bridge (1978) = 981′ main span

17. Delaware (Bethany Beach): Indian River Inlet Bridge (2012) = 950′ main span

18. West Virginia (Huntington): East Huntington Bridge (1985) = 900′ main span

19. Alabama (Mobile): Cochrane–Africatown USA Bridge (1991) = 781′ main span

20. Oregon (Portland): Tilikum Crossing (2015) = 780′ main span

21. Massachusetts (Boston): Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge (2003) = 745′ main span

22. New Jersey (Elizabeth): Goethals Bridge (2017) = 672′ main span

23. Iowa (Burlington): Great River Bridge (1993) = 660′ main span

24. Virginia (Richmond): Varina-Enon Bridge (1990) = 630′ main span

25. Minnesota (Stillwater)/Wisconsin (Houlton): Saint Croix Crossing (2017) = 599′ main span

26. Puerto Rico (Naranjito): Jesús Izcoa Moure Bridge (2008) = 518′ main span

27. Connecticut (New Haven): Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge (2016) = 517′ main span

28. Nebraska (Omaha): Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge (2008) = 506′ main span

29. Alaska (Sitka): John O’Connell Bridge (1972) = 450′ main span

30. Kansas (Wichita): Keeper Of The Plains Bridge (2007) = 225′ main span

31. Montana (Missoula): California Street Pedestrian Bridge (1999) = 201′ main span

32. Utah (Salt Lake City): George S. Eccles 2002 Legacy Bridge (2001) = 170′ main span

33. Maryland (Baltimore): Patterson Viaduct Pedestrian Bridge (2006) = 164′ main span

34. District of Columbia: New Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge (2022) = 150′ main span

35. Colorado (Denver): Denver Millennium Footbridge (2002) = 132′ main span

36. Tennessee (Benton): Ocoee River Cable-Stayed Bridge (1995) = main span length is  unknown/336′ total length

  • Arizona: none known
  • Hawaii: none known
  • Idaho: none known
  • Nevada: none known
  • New Hampshire: none known
  • New Mexico: none known
  • North Carolina: none known
  • North Dakota: none known
  • Oklahoma: none known
  • Rhode Island: none known
  • South Dakota: none known
  • Vermont: none known
  • Wyoming: none known

SOURCES:

 

 

Posted in architecture, bridges, cities, economic development, geography, highways, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, logistics, planning, shipping, spatial design, States, Statistics, traffic, transportation, Travel | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Roadside Americana: A montage of iconic Juke Joints

Blue Front Cafe – Bentonia, Mississippi – Source: visittheusa.com

The map and series of photos provided below depict juke joints, both past and present.  Historically associated with the Blues, most juke joints have been situated across the Deep South, particularly in and around the Mississippi Delta Region. Sadly, the number of juke joints has been declining over the years. As a result, a number of those depicted herein are no longer open for business – though the building may be standing in some instances.  Those juke joints which are still operating provide a rare glimpse into this iconic slice of both African-American history and Roadside Americana for locals, visitors, history buffs, and music fans, alike.

Please note that the map only identifies the town or the county where they are or were once operating. It is not meant to specify the exact location nor whether the juke joint is open. If you know of digital photos of other juke joints, please feel free to pass them along and they will be added to the post and the map. Enjoy!

http://

Club Ebony – Indianola, Mississippi – Source: pinterest.com

Fannie Grants – Jones, Georgia – Source: pinterest.com

Po’ Monkey’s – Merigold, Mississippi – Source: sharpmagazine.com

Frenchies Bar & Gas – Belle Glade, Florida – Source: wikimedia.commons.org

The Pines – Florida – Source: art.com

Do Drop Inn – Shelby, Mississippi – Source: pinterest.com

Ollie’s Juke Joint & Cafe – Kingston, Oklahoma – Source: chickasawcountry.com

Everglade Garden – Belle Glade, Florida – Source: picryl.com

Da Palace – Mississippi – Source: pinterest.com

Blue Door Cafe – Belzoni, Mississippi – Source: pinterest.com

Red Top Lounge – Source: pinterest.com

Effie’s Lounge – Memphis (North), Tennessee – Source: pinterest.com

Ford’s – Louisiana – Source: pinterest.com

Purple Rain Lounge – Duncan, Mississippi – Source: jacksonfineart.com

Former Jr.’s – Holly Springs, Mississippi – Source: ratpackstlouis.com

Jr.’s Juke Joint #2 – Holly Springs, Mississippi – ratpackstlouis.com

Red’s – Clarksdale, Mississippi – Source: pbase.com

Pink Pony Cafe – Darling, Mississippi – Source: pinterest.com

Former juke joint – Baton Rouge, Louisiana – Source: westbatonrougemuseum.org

Former juke joint – White Station, Mississippi – Source: pinterest.com

Leroy’s – Porter, Indiana – Source: digthedunes.com

Teddy’s Juke Joint – Zachary. Louisiana – Source: countryroadsmagazine.com

Former juke joint – Jacksonville, Florida – Source: floridamemory.com

Griffin’s Hines Farm Blues Club – Swanton, Ohio – Source: toledo.com/news/2014/06/17/listen-up-toledo/at-the-crossroads-griffin-s-hines-farm-blues-club-reopens/

Key Hole Inn – Indianola. Mississippi – Source: flickr.com via pinterest.com

Former juke joint – Source: pinterest.com

Gip’s Place – Bessemer, Alabama – Source: bhamnow.com

Bobby’s Lounge – Bay St. Louis, Mississippi – Source: bslshoofly.com

Dot Inn – Source: pinterest.com

2 Spot – Jacksonville, Florida – Source: thejaxsonmag.com

Former juke joint – Tallahassee, Florida – Source: floridamemory.com

Todd’s Piney Pig – Long County, Georgia – Source: vanishingsouthgeorgia.com

Mr. C. – Tattnall County, Georgia – Source: vanishingsouthgeorgia.com

Thomas Social Club – Georgia (South) – Source: vanishingsouthgeorgia.com

Former Eastside Park Juke Joint – Ocala, Florida – Source: ocala.com

The Bucket – Clearview, Oklahoma – Source: city-data.com

Blue Moon – Mississippi – Source: pinterest.com

Dub’s Place – Baker County, Georgia – Source: vanishingsouthgeorgia.com

Wild Cats – Richmond Hill, Georgia – Source: pinterest.com

That Other Place – Hinsonton, Georgia – Source vanishingsouthgeorgia.com

African Queen – Ferriday, Louisiana – Source: louisianafolklife.org

Riverfront – Helena, Arkansas – Source: flickr.com

Bear’s Place – Mississippi? – Source: ckeirn.wordpress.com

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If juke joints and their history intrigues you too, here are a couple of visual links to a book and a film documentary about them, that are available through Amazon.com.*

http://    http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Posted in adaptive reuse, architecture, cities, commerce, Cuisine, culture, economic gardening, entertainment, entrepreneurship, film, fun, geography, historic preservation, history, land use, music, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, poverty, third places, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

America’s earliest example of destructive urban renewal

Original Circleville plan – Source: ohiohistorycentral.org

Like most people, when asked where America’s first urban renewal project was undertaken, I would have probably guessed cities like New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, or Boston. These are all logical guesses, but the first urban renewal (or redevelopment) project in the nation took place in a much smaller city/town – Circleville, Ohio. Like subsequent urban renewal projects, this one devastated a unique and charming urban design. Even worse, it completely destroyed the wondrous ancient Hopewell mounds and earthworks that literally gave Circleville both its place name and its founding identity.

Placemaking is a planning concept and tool that relies on multiple factors to be successful. These include, but are not necessarily limited to identity, history, and locale. In placemaking, it is crucial to determine and build upon those attributes that endowed the community with its identity and not become overwhelmed by the bland sameness that has infected too many places in the United States. Placebreaking, on the other hand, can be defined as the destruction of place through misguided actions, mistakes, bad decisions, and those activities that detract from rather than enhance a community.

Founded in 1810 as the seat of Pickaway County, Circleville was named for the circular portion of the magnificent ancient Hopewell Culture earthworks located there. These earthworks consisted of an impressive 1,100 foot diameter circle connected to a 900 foot square (see image below).

Map of the Circleville earthworks – Source: radio.wosu.org

In an attempt to mitigate the impact of the new community on these timeless archaeological treasures, the core of Circleville was laid out in a radial concentric street pattern by Town Director Daniel Dresbach. In preparing this platted design, Mr. Dresbach attempted to preserve some of the Hopewell mounds and earthworks. Though not a perfect scenario, it was a surprisingly respectful 19th-century attempt to incorporate the ancient archaeological features into the town’s design. At the center of the circles would be the octagon-shaped Pickaway County Courthouse.

Source: ci.circleville.oh.us.

As can be seen by the images included in this post, Circleville was indeed initially developed in this manner – an urban design and land use pattern that truly was unique for its time. Unfortunately, the quasi-utopian desire of early American settlers coexisting respectfully with an ancient archaeological site began to unravel less than three (3) decades later.

Circlevile in 1836 – Source: ohiogeneaologypress.com

Apparently, the original radial street pattern was unsatisfactory to a certain portion of the citizenry of Circleville. As a result, the State of Ohio was petitioned in the 1830s to allow the town to be redeveloped in a traditional square grid pattern. This request was approved by the Ohio legislature in 1837 and within 20 years (by 1856) Mr. Dresbach’s beautiful and largely respectful urban design had been obliterated…along with the ancient Hopewell earthworks that personified Circleville. Even the unique octagon courthouse was demolished as part of this multi-year process. The images depict this unfortunate series of changes where Circleville literally destroyed the placemaking features that had made it unique and noteworthy.

Images of the graduated destruction of Circleville’s original plan – Source: radio.wosu.org

Today, Circleville proudly boasts on its website about its planning history as being the place of America’s first urban redevelopment (or renewal) project. However, to this retired planner, the actions that altered the original urban design and the ensuing impacts on the wondrous archaeological features once located here are hardly anything to be bragging about.

Perhaps, Circleville should have been renamed Blundertown, because the steps taken between 1837 and 1856, were a tragic and irreversible mistake that permanently destroyed the ancient Hopewell earthworks that were the town’s namesake. One can hardly do more damage to a community’s identity than to ruin its namesake. It would be akin to blocking off Niagara Falls or draining the Great Salt Lake.

Circleville in 1876- Source: common.wikimedia.org

The staggering losses resulting from the destruction of the Circleville Earthworks is incalculable, whether measured in historical, archaeological, cultural, ethical, moral, societal, or financial terms.

The lost scientific knowledge that could have been gained from continued study of the Circleville Earthworks has limited our collective (societal) understating of the Hopewell Culture. It also weakened Circleville’s place in the hierarchy of archaeological importance. Similar adverse implications can be noted for historical and cultural impacts resulting from the destruction of the Circleville Earthworks.

From a financial standpoint, this renewal project also likely cost Circleville millions of potential visitors and the associated tourism revenues. A city designed in such a unique, thoughtful, and impressive manner would certainly would have become a tourist attraction akin to Savannah, Charleston, Williamsburg, New Bern, Zoar, Quebec City, and the French Quarter of New Orleans. In addition, those tourists who are interested in the rich archaeological features of this region now drive right past Circleville to Hopewell Culture National Historical Park in Chillicothe a mere 25 miles to the south, or to the Newark Earthworks some 50 miles to the northeast.

Examples of Hopewell Culture Earthworks – Source: newarkearthworkscenter.blogspot.com

But, the most damaging aspects are the ethical and moral implications resulting from the destruction of the Circleville Earthworks. Americans have a terribly unpleasant penchant for destroying the very things that make a particular place special. Whether it has been done through grading, clearing, burning, altering, bulldozing, polluting, re-platting, overpopulating, or paving; at times it seems we find more ways to desecrate special places than we find to enhance them. Circleville was just the earliest noted example of our moral and ethical compass going haywire as part of an urban renewal project. Sadly, it would prove repeatedly not to be the last mishap.

We have seen historic Black neighborhoods and main streets demolished, Latinx barrios fall to the wrecking ball, and poor/underprivileged parts of cities leveled by bulldozers, all in the name of urban renewal. These are the continuing examples of America’s ethical and moral obligations being out-of-whack beyond the loss of the Circleville Earthworks.

Perhaps, one potential micro-level solution would be for placebreaking mistakes like happened in Circleville to receive greater emphasis in urban planning school programs. On a societal level, however, the ill-conceived myth of American exceptionalism must be reined-in to a paradigm that is more communal, diverse, inclusive, accepting, and universal. Otherwise, we will continue to repeat these woeful mistakes time and time again and harm ourselves (both individually and collectively) in the process.

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If you find the historic mounds and earthworks of ancient Native American cultures to be interesting, here is an excellent resource available through Amazon.com* about those located in the Mid-Ohio Valley, including areas near Circleville.

http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in archaeology, architecture, branding, cities, civics, civility, culture, diversity, downtown, economic development, geography, government, historic preservation, history, Housing, inclusiveness, infrastructure, injustice, land use, Maps, Native Americans, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, politics, product design, revitalization, spatial design, sprawl, third places, topography, toponymy, tourism, Trade, traffic, transportation, Travel, urban design, urban planning, visual pollution | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Longest state segments of three-digit Interstate Highways

Source: en.wikipedia.org

RANKINGS (As of 02/24/21 – Minimum of 40 miles in length)

  1. Interstate 476 – Pennsylvania = 129.61 miles
  2. Interstate 495 – Massachusetts = 121.56 miles
  3. Interstate 135 – Kansas = 95.74 miles
  4. Interstate 196 – Michigan = 80.65 miles
  5. Interstate 376 – Pennsylvania = 78.70 miles
  6. Interstate 840 – Tennessee = 77.28 miles
  7. Interstate 295 – New Jersey = 76.40 miles
  8. Interstate 390 – New York = 76.06 miles
  9. Interstate 580 – California = 75.63 miles
  10. Interstate 380 – Iowa = 73.05 miles
  11. Interstate 405 – California = 72.15 miles
  12. Interstate 680 – California = 70.52 miles
  13. Interstate 165 – Kentucky = 69.68 miles
  14. Interstate 287 – New Jersey = 67.54 miles
  15. Interstate 275 – Ohio = 66.76 miles
  16. Interstate 485 – North Carolina = 66.68 miles
  17. Interstate 495 – New York = 66.38 miles
  18. Interstate 285 – Georgia = 63.98 miles
  19. Interstate 295 – Florida = 61.04 miles
  20. Interstate 275 – Florida = 60.64 miles
  21. Interstate 280 – California = 57.22 miles
  22. Interstate 587 – North Carolina = 55.90 miles
  23. Interstate 270 – Ohio = 54.97 miles
  24. Interstate 395 – Connecticut = 54.69 miles
  25. Interstate 215 – California = 54.50 miles
  26. Interstate 435 – Missouri = 54.16 miles
  27. Interstate 294 – Illinois = 53.42 miles
  28. Interstate 295 – Maine = 53.11 miles
  29. Interstate 465 – Indiana = 52.79 miles
  30. Interstate 295 – Virginia = 52.56 miles
  31. Interstate 695 – Maryland =51.46 miles
  32. Interstate 335 – Kansas = 50.13 miles
  33. Interstate 555 – Arkansas = 49.80 miles
  34. Interstate 410 – Texas = 49.49 miles
  35. Interstate 185 – Georgia = 49.30 miles
  36. Interstate 210 – California = 48.72 miles
  37. Interstate 880 – California = 47.22 miles
  38. Interstate 530 – Arkansas = 46.65 miles
  39. Interstate 271 – Ohio = 46.06 miles
  40. Interstate 494 – Minnesota = 42.94 miles
  41. Interstate 495 – Maryland = 42.24
  42. Interstate 385 – South Carolina = 42.16 miles
  43. Interstate 480 – Ohio = 41.77 miles

Note: State segments listed above may or may not be the entire length of the Interstate, but represent the mileage in that particular state.

SOURCES:

Posted in bridges, Cars, cities, commerce, geography, highways, history, infrastructure, land use, Maps, planning, tourism, Trade, traffic, transportation, Travel | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tuesday Tunes: The best progressive rock song in decades!

 

Jake, Josh, Sam, and Danny – Source: mlive.com

If you are one who grew up listening to Pink Floyd, the Moody Blues, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, early Genesis, Rush, and certain tracks by Queen (Bohemian Rhapsody) and Led Zeppelin, you’ll know what progressive rock (or Prog Rock for short) is all about. Over the past weekend, I heard a new song by Greta Van Fleet that honors the majestic tradition of prog rock and amplifies it into the 21st century with a degree of gloriousness that is nearly impossible of encapsulate in mere words. Perhaps, some of the comments on YouTube about the song say it best:

  • “So what have you been doing in lockdown, guys?”
    “Well, we just produced a few masterpieces.”
  • “That felt like a religious experience.”
  • “There’s something so celestial and magical about this.”
  • “Don’t know why, but this song makes me feel like anything is possible.”
  • “Its like Freddy Mercury, Robert Plant, Geddy Lee had a love child.”

“Heat Above” is the third single released as part of these four Frankenmuth, Michigan lad’s second full-length album entitled The Battle at Garden’s Gate, which is due out on April 16th. The video debuted last Friday and has taken rock n’ roll lovers of all ages by storm. Clocking in at 5:42, “Heat Above” marches spectacularly along beyond the traditional single release length – as any self-respecting prog rock song should do.

Source: acousticsounds.com

Josh Kiszka’s amazing vocal range is on full display here and when he launches in the chorus:

“Can you feel my love

Rising in the heat above

Life’s the story of

Ascending to the stars as one”

One cannot help but get goosebumps and feel uplifted from these lyrics.  His brothers Jake (guitar) and Sam (organ/keyboard), as well as drummer Danny Wagner take the song to even greater heights with amazing instrumentation throughout. Overall, listening to “Heat Above” really does feel like a religious experience. I, for one, cannot wait for the album to come out in April and to hear many more years of continued waves of sonic joy emanating from this quartet of immensely talented young men.

Bravo, Great Van Fleet! Bravo!

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If you love Greta Van Fleet’s music as much as I do, here are a few links to some of their newest music and a book about them that are available via Amazon.com.*

http://  http://

CD                                              Digital

http://    http://

Single of “Heat Above”                             Book

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in art, Communications, diversity, entertainment, fun, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, Love, music, music reviews, peace, Radio, video, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Laredo: From 275-day national capital to border boomtown

Flag of the Republic of the Rio Grande – now the city flag of Laredo, TX – Source: en.wikipedia.org

Between 1838 and 1841 there was an effort to establish a new nation along the Rio Grande composed of parts of the Northern Frontier of Mexico and disputed portions of the then Republic of Texas located south of the Nueces River. Named the Republic of the Rio Grande by its founders, Laredo was chosen as the capital city. The photo below shows the capitol building located in downtown Laredo, which is now home to the Republic of the Rio Grande Museum.

National Capitol Building – Source: atlasobscura.com

A dispute with the central government of General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna in Mexico City had led to the establishment of the republic. Authorities in Mexico City were trending towards a Centralist form of government, while the northern residents bordering the Rio Grande preferred a less-centralized, Federalist system.

Much of the approximate three-year period when efforts were being made to establish this new nation, was spent trying to maintain its newly declared independence from Mexico. Texas, on the other hand generally took a hands-off approach, though some Texans fought on the side of the Republic of the Rio Grande when it clashed with armies of the central government.

Texas portion – light red & Mexico portion – dark red – Source: en.wikipedia.org

The map shown above identifies the boundaries of this short-lived and disputed nation. The Republic of the Rio Grande formally existed for just 275 days – from January 17, 1840 to November 6, 1840. Among the appointed officials who served in office during this brief time period were:

Vice President Carbajal – Source: en.wikipedia.org

Source: webbheritage.org

1892 map of Laredo – Source: en.wikipedia.org

However, the demise of the Republic of the Rio Grande was not the end of the story for Laredo. Today, Laredo, Texas is known as the Gateway City and it routinely contends with Los Angeles as the busiest trade port city in the United States (land, sea, and/or air). It is also the largest inland port on the U.S./Mexican border, as a huge proportion of the goods and commerce between the two countries passes through the city and its younger sister, Nuevo Laredo, Mexico located just across the Rio Grande. This booming transborder metropolitan agglomeration is now is home to nearly 800,000 residents.

Source: amazon.com

As the most important border crossing with Mexico (best access to Monterrey and Mexico City), Laredo is a critical hub for highways and railroads. Currently, Interstates 35 and 69W intersect here, with Interstate 2 in the process of being extended from the Lower Rio Grande Valley and Interstate 27 planned to be extended to Laredo from Lubbock. Additionally, Laredo/Nuevo Laredo is the busiest rail crossing between the United States and Mexico, with both Kansas City Southern and Union Pacific having major operations here. Four bridges (three road and one rail) provide cross-border access with another railway bridge under development.

Source: virtualglobetrotting.com via maps.google.com

Needless to say, it appears those who founded the Republic of the Rio Grande understood the importance of the Laredo area as a trade and economic center when they named it their national capital 181 years ago last month. Given its current trajectory, greater Laredo will continue to excel as the most important capital of transborder commerce between the United States and Mexico for many decades to come.

Viva Laredo!

Satellite image of Laredo/Nuevo Laredo – Source: en.wikipedia.org

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If you are interested in Laredo and/or the Republic of the Rio Grande, here are a few items (a book, a flag, and a poster) that are available through Amazon.com.*

http://

http://

http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in archaeology, cities, commerce, culture, geography, government, highways, historic preservation, history, land use, Latin America, Maps, Mexico, pictures, place names, placemaking, politics, rail, Railroads, rivers/watersheds, shipping, topography, tourism, Trade, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shortest state segments of three-digit Interstate Highways

 

I-129 in Nebraska and a tiny bit of Iowa – Source: maps.google.com

As a follow-up to the previous post on the shortest state segments of one and two-digit Interstate Highways, here is a list of the shortest state segments of three-digit Interstate Highways.

RANKINGS (Based on current mileage as of 2/19/21)

Maximum 10 miles in length

  1. Interstate 495 – Washington Area – DC portion only (co-signed with I-95) = 0.11 miles

2. Interstate 129 – Sioux City Area – Iowa portion only = 0.27 miles (see photo above)

3. Interstate 878 – New York City, New York = 0.70 miles –  not signed/**shortest full Interstate in the entire system**

4. Interstate 480 – Omaha Area – Iowa portion only = 0.72 miles

5. Interstate 471 – Cincinnati Area – Ohio portion only = 0.74 miles (see map at the end of the post)

6. Interstate 295 – Washington Area – Maryland portion only = 0.80 miles

7. tie – Interstate 670 – Kansas City Area – Kansas portion only & Interstate 315 – Great Falls, Montana (not signed) = 0.83 miles

9. Interstate 110 – El Paso, Texas = 0.89 miles

10. Interstate 375 – Detroit, Michigan = 1.06 miles – schedule to be replaced by a boulevard

11. Interstate 180 – Cheyenne, Wyoming = 1.09 miles – **only Interstate in the Lower 48 not built to Interstate standards**

12. Interstate 115 – Butte, Montana = 1.19 miles

13. Interstate 194 – Bismarck, North Dakota = 1.20 miles

14. tie – Interstate 535 – Duluth Area – Wisconsin portion only & Interstate 587 – Kingston, New York = 1.21 miles

16. Interstate 375 – St. Petersburg, Florida = 1.22 miles

17. tie – Interstate 175 – St. Petersburg, Florida & Interstate 395 – Miami, Florida = 1.29 miles

19. Interstate 395 – Baltimore, Maryland = 1.33 miles

20. Interstate 695 – Washington, DC = 1.39 miles

21. tie – Interstate 684 – New York City Area – Connecticut portion only & Interstate 345 – Dallas, Texas = 1.40 miles – may be converted to a boulevard

23. Interstate 189 – Burlington, Vermont = 1.49 miles

24. Interstate 705 – Tacoma, Washington = 1.50 miles

25. tie – Interstate 535 – Duluth Area – Minnesota portion only Interstate 579 – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania = 1.57 miles

26. Interstate 380 – San Francisco, California = 1.67 miles

27. Interstate 190 – Rapid City, South Dakota = 1.72 miles

28. Interstate 695 – New York City, New York = 1.77 miles

29. Interstate 124 – Chattanooga, Tennessee = 1.97 miles – not signed

30. Interstate 278 – New York Area – New Jersey portion only = 2.00 miles – **never connects to I-78**

31. Interstate 980 – Oakland, California = 2.03 miles – planned to be converted to a boulevard

32. Interstate 670 – Kansas City Area – Missouri portion only = 2.10 miles

33. Interstate 238 – Oakland, California = 2.13 miles – **only three-digit Interstate without a two-digit parent Interstate**

34. Interstate 478 – New York City, New York = 2.14 miles

35. Interstate 676 – Philadelphia Area – Pennsylvania portion only = 2.15 miles

36. Interstate 222 – Birmingham, Alabama = 2.26 – proposed to connect I-22 to planned I-422

37. tie – Interstate 195 – Saco/Biddeford, Maine & Interstate 790 – Utica, New York = 2.41 miles

39. Interstate 490 – Cleveland, Ohio = 2.43 miles

40. Interstate 444 – Tulsa, Oklahoma = 2.51 miles

41. Interstate 370 – Washington Area (Gaithersburg, Maryland) = 2.54 miles

42. Interstate 359 – Tuscaloosa, Alabama = 2.76 miles

43. Interstate 283 – Harrisburg, Pennsylvania = 2.907 miles

44. Interstate 381 – Bristol, Virginia = 2.910 miles

45. Interstate 275 – Knoxville, Tennessee = 2.98 miles

46. Interstate 564 – Norfolk, Virginia = 3.03 miles

47. Interstate 510 – New Orleans, Louisiana = 3.04 miles

48. Interstate 190 – Chicago, Illinois = 3.07 miles

49. Interstate 275 – Cincinnati Area – Indiana portion only = 3.16 miles

50. Interstate 129 – Sioux City Area – Nebraska portion only = 3.21 miles (see photo at the top of the post)

51. Interstate 194 – Battle Creek, Michigan = 3.37 miles

52. Interstate 395 – Washington Area – DC portion only = 3.40 miles

53. Interstate 296 – Grand Rapids, Michigan = 3.43 miles –  not signed

54. Interstate 180 – Lincoln, Nebraska = 3.47 miles

55. Interstate 105 – Eugene Oregon = 3.49 miles

56. 3 way tie – Interstate 794 – Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Interstate 195 – Richmond, Virginia; & Interstate 585 – Spartanburg, South Carolina = 3.50 miles

59. Interstate 635 – Kansas City Area – Missouri portion only = 3.60 miles

6o. Interstate 184 – Boise, Idaho = 3.62 miles

61. Interstate 126 – Columbia, South Carolina = 3.68 miles

62. Interstate 470 – Wheeling Area – West Virginia portion only = 3.94 miles

63. Interstate 295 – Providence Area – Massachusetts portion only = 4.03 miles

64. tie – Interstate 110 – Biloxi, Mississippi & Interstate H-201 – Honolulu, Hawaii = 4.10 miles

66. Interstate 277 – Akron, Ohi0 = 4.14 miles

67. Interstate 369 – Texarkana, Texas = 4.21 miles – proposed to be extended to Marshall, TX

68. Interstate 405 – Portland, Oregon = 4.25 miles

69. Interstate 195 – Providence Area – Rhode Island portion only = 4.30 miles

70. Interstate 195 – Baltimore, Maryland = 4.35 miles

71. Interstate 495 – Portland, Maine (unsigned) = 4.39 miles

72. Interstate 277 – Charlotte, North Carolina = 4.41 miles

73. Interstate 195 – Miami, Florida = 4.42 miles

74. Interstate 759 – Gadsden, Alabama = 4.54 miles

75. Interstate 393 – Concord, New Hampshire = 4.59 miles

76. Interstate 395 – Bangor, Maine = 4.99 miles

77. Interstate 865 – Indianapolis, Indiana = 4.72 miles

78. Interstate 676 – Philadelphia Area – New Jersey portion only = 4.75 miles

79. Interstate 391 – Springfield, Massachusetts = 4.86 miles

80. Interstate 781 – Watertown, New York = 4.90 miles

81. Interstate 610 – New Orleans, Louisiana = 4.92 miles

82.Interstate 480 – Omaha Area –Nebraska portion only = 4.95 miles

83. Interstate 471 – Cincinnati Area – Kentucky portion only = 5.02 miles

84. tie – Interstate 590 – Rochester, New York & Interstate 165 – Mobile, Alabama = 5.07 miles

86. Interstate 235 – Oklahoma City, Oklahoma = 5.36 miles

87. Interstate 291 – Springfield, Massachusetts = 5.44 miles

88. Interstate 464 – Norfolk, Virginia = 5.67 miles

89. Interstate 295 – Philadelphia Area – Delaware portion only = 5.71 miles

90. tie – Interstate 305 – Sacramento, California ( not signed) & Interstate 310 – Gulfport, Mississippi (planned) = 6.00 miles

92. Interstate 110 – Pensacola, Florida = 6.34 miles

93. Interstate 581 – Roanoke, Virginia = 6.35 miles

94. Interstate 291 – Hartford, Connecticut = 6.40 miles

95. Interstate 990 – Buffalo, New York = 6.43 miles

96. Interstate 516 – Savannah, Georgia = 6.49 miles

97. Interstage 470 – Wheeling Area – Ohio portion only = 6.69 miles

98. Interstate 780 – Vallejo, California = 6.76 miles

99. Interstate 785 – Greensboro, North Carolina = 7.10 miles – to be extended to Danville, VA

100. Interstate 270 – Denver, Colorado = 7.11 miles

101. Interstate 295 – Washington Area – DC portion only = 7.25 miles

102. tie – Interstate 630 – Little Rock, Arkansas & Interstate 795 – Jacksonville, Florida (under construction) = 7.40 miles

104. Interstate 440 – Nashville, Tennessee= 7.64 miles

105. Interstate 675 – Saginaw. Michigan = 7.73 miles

106. Interstate 520 – Augusta, Georgia Area – South Carolina portion only = 7.99 miles

107. Interstate 384 – Hartford, Connecticut = 8.53 miles

108. Interstate 905 – San Diego, California = 8.89 miles – schedule to be designated an Interstate

109. Interstate 691 – Hartford, Connecticut = 8.92 miles

110. Interstate 795 – Baltimore, Maryland = 8.99 miles

111. Interstate 110 – Baton Rouge, Louisiana = 9.06 miles

112. Interstate 635 – Kansas City Area – Kansas portion only = 9.10 miles

113. Interstate 240 – Asheville, North Carolina = 9.14 miles

114. Interstate 890 – Schenectady, New York = 9.45 miles

115. Interstate 787 – Albany, New York = 9.55 miles

116. Interstate 280 – Quad Cities Area – Iowa portion only = 9.58 miles

117. tie – Interstate 394 – Minneapolis, Minnesota & Interstate 169 – Brownsville, Texas = 9.74 miles

119. Interstate 295 – New York City, New York = 9.79 miles

120. Interstate 894 – Milwaukee, Wisconsin = 9.92 miles – co-signed with Interstate 41 and partially so with Interstate 43

I-471 in Ohio – Source: maps.google.com

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Here’s a comprehensive guide to services available at exits along the Interstate Highway system that is available through Amazon.com*

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*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in bridges, Cars, cities, commerce, geography, highways, history, infrastructure, land use, Maps, planning, spatial design, Statistics, tourism, Trade, transportation, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

A salute to Alabama’s landmark “Liberty Bell” village

Postcard image of Nitrate Village #1 – Source: alabamapioneers.com

Every now and then you learn a new tidbit about American history or a unique aspect of community planning lore. The subject of this blogpost would certainly qualify as both.

During World War I, the United States was looking to establish a location for the production of nitrate, as it is a key ingredient in ammonia gas and ammonium nitrate – an important ingredient in explosives and ammunition for the war effort. Access to existing nitrate resources in Chile had been greatly reduced by the threat of German U-Boat attacks. As a result, the Federal government decided to establish nitrate production facilities near Muscle Shoals, Alabama.

Postcard image of Nitrate Plant #1 – Source: medium.com

Nitrate Plant #1 was developed here utilizing Haber process for producing ammonia, which did not require large amounts of electricity. However, Nitrate Plant #2 was going to be a different story. Therefore, the Muscle Shoals location was beneficial because the Tennessee River could be dammed for producing the hydroelectricity that the second plant required. Wilson Dam, as shown below, was constructed, in part, for this purpose. Furthermore, as part of the overall project, the government needed to create housing for military officers and staff, supervisors, and workers at these facilities.

Wilson Dam – Muscle Shoals, AL – Source: tva.com

The resulting communities were inauspiciously named Nitrate Villages #1, 2, and 3. Nitrate Village #1 was designed and built for U.S. Army Ordnance Department officers and staff from Nitrate Plant #1 (2/15/21 gmail). Meanwhile Nitrate Villages #2 and 3 were set aside for those Army Ordnance officers and staff assigned to Nitrate Plant #2 and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Wilson Dam, respectively (2/15/21 gmail). Nitrate Village #2 no longer exists, though some of the frame dwellings were relocated into the City of Sheffield (2/15/21 gmail). Many dwellings of Nitrate Village #3 remain and are located across the river in the City of Florence (2/15/21 gmail).

Original plan for Nitrate Village #1 – Source: Architectural Forum

Nitrate Village #1 was designed by Mann & MacNeille Architects and Town Planners (2/15/21 gmail). It’s a community that is uniquely shaped like the Liberty Bell, incorporating the hanger, the clapper, and the bell’s outer body.  The 75-acre garden city-style community was originally designed to contain a complete village, including:

  • 400 Craftsman-style bungalow homes in seven different sizes/designs, most situated  on approximate 5,000 square foot lots
  • Two school buildings
  • A barracks/apartment building for single officers and staff
  • Two village greens
  • Shops and services
  • A hotel and a hospital

The entire community was designed with a distinctive Mission Revival Style architectural appearance.

Plan for the barracks/apartments – Source: Architectural Forum

World War I ended shortly after the nitrate plant was completed and it subsequently closed in 1919. Furthermore, work was stopped on Nitrate Village #1 before all elements of it could be finished, particularly the planned hospital, shops, hotel, and second school. Of the original plan for 400 dwellings, only 112 were completed.  After development work had stopped, most of the village sat unoccupied for nearly 15 years.

1949 Plat of Nitrate Village #1 – Source: npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NRHP/84000603_text

During the Great Depression, the former nitrate factory was reopened in 1933 by the Roosevelt Administration as both a fertilizer plant and development center under the oversight of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Nitrate Village #1 remained government-owned and operated until 1949, when it was turned over to the City of Sheffield.

Officers dwelling as planned – Source: Architectural Forum

Officers dwelling in Nitrate Village #1 today – Source: tclf.org

As the images above and below indicate, the homes built within Nitrate Village #1 are beautiful and have been lovingly maintained. Above is a comparison of an officer’s dwelling as planned in 1918 and as it exists currently. Meanwhile, below, is a side-by-side example of a skilled mechanic’s house as it was proposed and built a century ago and as it exists today.

Source: Architectural Forum

Source: alabamapioneers.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Set on a bluff overlooking the Tennessee River, Nitrate Village #1 is a wonderfully preserved example of planning and design methods of the time. The National Register nomination form notes the following:

“Community Planning – The Nitrate Village is significant as an example of an early 20th century planned community for the Federal Government. The village is an example of the emergency war developments for the government during World War I that were designed and built with rapid construction time and utilitarian quality as the foremost requirements but with concerns for harmony and variety throughout the town plan. The designers of the village, Ewing and Alien, Architects and Town Planners, utilized plaster scale models of each type of house to study group effects and to achieve the optimum design. The final design was the distinctive ‘Liberty Bell’ street plan.”

SOURCE: npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NRHP/84000603_text

Historic view of the school and parts of the village – Source: facebook.com/pg/TheVillageSchoolFoundation/about/?ref=page_internal

In 1985, Nitrate Village #1 was rightfully added to the National Register of Historic Places. As the photos contained throughout this blogpost clearly indicate, despite its rather unflattering name, Nitrate Village #1 is a lovely century-old community.

Recent image of The Village School – Source: facebook.com/pg/TheVillageSchoolFoundation/about/?ref=page_internal

Source: facebook.com/pg/TheVillageSchoolFoundation/about/?ref=page_internal

A 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, named The Village School Foundation, has been established to restore and care for the former village school building on behalf of the City of Sheffield. The school had remained in use for educational purposes until the 1990s. It, the former barracks/apartment building, the remaining houses, and the village green(s) provide a unique glimpse into our nation’s town planning heritage from the World War I era.

Village Green in Nitrate Village #1 – Source: tclf.org

To this retired planner, Nitrate Village #1 is a tremendous example of thoughtful community planning and design. For this reason and many others articulated in this blogpost, Nitrate Village #1 should be duly recognized and honored by the American Planning Association as a National Planning Landmark.

Recent aerial view of Nitrate Village #1 – Source: gavindrew.com

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If this subject interests you, here’s a book that contains a chapter on Nitrate Village #1, which is available though Amazon.com.*

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*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

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Posted in archaeology, architecture, cities, civics, culture, education, energy, geography, historic preservation, history, Housing, industry, infrastructure, land use, Maps, place names, placemaking, planning, schools, spatial design, topography, toponymy, tourism, Travel, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Soviet-era and Russian Monotowns

Geographic distribution of Monotowns in Russia – Manufacturing (blue), Mining (green), two principal industries (black), and other industries (red) – Source: lup.lub.lu.se

In Russia, cities and towns whose economy and existence are largely tied to a single, dominating industry are referred as “Monotowns,” which is short for Monofunctional Towns (or Cities). These are basically their equivalent to the Western terminology of Company Towns.” Most were established during the Soviet Era. The map provided at the top of the post identifies the geographical distribution of Russian Monotowns. Many of them are also listed in alphabetical order below.

Toyaltti, Russia – Source: conwaysrussianhockey.wordpress.com

As with Company Towns here in the West, the economic, structural, and societal risks of being a Monotown are great. A downward turn in the economy, a collapsed trade agreement, a bad production cycle, economic malaise, government decisions, competition from home and abroad, technological changes, and a variety of other factors can directly impact the Monotown.

Without a diversified economy, such an event or event(s) can drastically impact the community and its citizenry, as there are limited alternatives for them to fall back on during a downturn. American cities like Youngstown, Flint, Pittsburgh, Detroit, and others have all learned the hard way that an economy too closely tied to one industry can have catastrophic consequences that can last for decades.

There are approximately 300 Monotowns in Russia. Here’s a list of some of the prominent ones and the industries they are tied to:

  • Anzhero-Sudzhensk – coal mining
  • Asha – metals manufactring
  • Baykalsk – paper
  • Belaya Kholunitsa – conveyors
  • Belebey – auto parts
  • Chegdomyn – coal mining
  • Cherepovets – ferrous metals
  • Chernogorsk – coal mining
  • Chusovoy – metal production
  • Dalnegorsk – chemicals
  • Gavrilov-Yam – aircraft engines
  • Gukovo – coal mining
  • Kamensk-Uralsky – metals manufacturing
  • Kameshkovo (Vladimir Oblast) – textiles
  • Kamskiye Polyany – pumps
  • Kanash – buses and trailers
  • Karabash (Chelyabinsk Oblast) – metals manufacturing
  • Karpinsk – mining machinery
  • Kaspiysk – watercraft motors
  • Kirovsk (Murmansk Oblast) – chemicals
  • Kirs – cables
  • Kondopoga – paper
  • Krasavino, Veliky Ustyug (Vologda Oblast) – electricity
  • Krasnoturyinsk – non-ferrous metals
  • Krasnovishersk – mining
  • Kumertau – helicopters
  • Kurlovo (Vladimir Oblast)- glass
  • Kuvandyk – non-ferrous metals
  • Kuvshinovo (Kuvshinovsky District, Tver Oblast)
  • Luza (Luzsky District, Kirov Oblast) – timber
  • Naberezhnye Chelny – heavy duty trucks
  • Novotroitsk – iron production
  • Nyazepetrovsk – machinery
  • Nytva – copper
  • Ochyor – oil field pumps
  • Onega – timber
  • Pervouralsk – metals manufacturing
  • Pestovo (Pestovsky District, Novgorod Oblast) – timber
  • Pikalyovo (Leningrad Oblast) – cement
  • Pitkyaranta – paper
  • Prokopyevsk – coal mining
  • Pudozh – timber
  • Raychikhinsk – coal mining
  • Revda (Murmansk Oblast)
  • Salair – silver
  • Sazonovo (Chagodoshchensky District, Vologda Oblast)
  • Selenginsk – paper
  • Severouralsk – copper mining
  • Shelekhov – aluminium
  • Spirovo (Spirovsky District, Tver Oblast) – glass
  • Suoyarvi – paper
  • Svobodny (Amur Oblast) – rail transportation
  • Tashtagol – iron ore mining
  • Tolyatti – the largest Monotown in terms of population = 707,408 (2018). Its economy is tied to automobile production.
  • Uralsky (Perm Krai) – timber
  • Ust-Katav – machinery
  • Velikooktyabrsky – glass
  • Verkhny Ufaley – metals manufacturing
  • Volchansk – coal machinery
  • Vyatskiye Polyany – hunting and sporting weapons
  • Yaroslavsky (Primorsky Krai) – metal production
  • Yurga – machinery
  • Zapadnaya Dvina – paper
  • Zelenodolsk – shipbuilding

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If you find this topic of interest, here’s a book resource on the subject that’s available through Amazon.com.*

http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in business, cities, civics, commerce, Economy, geography, health, history, humanity, industry, infrastructure, land use, Maps, Mining, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, poverty, Russia, social equity, sustainability, Trade, transportation, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shortest state segments of one/two digit Interstate Highways

RANKINGS BASED ON CURRENT MILEAGE (02/11/21)

Maximum of 75 miles in length

Where I-95 barely passes through DC – Source: virginiaplaces.org

  1. Interstate 95 in the District of Columbia = 0.11 miles – co-signed with Interstate 495
  2. Interstate 78 in New York = 0.50 miles
  3. Interstate 66 in the District of Columbia = 1.60 miles
  4. Interstate 72 in Missouri = 2.04 miles
  5. Interstate 76 in New Jersey = 3.08 miles
  6. Interstate 76 in Nebraska = 3.15 miles
  7. Interstage 24 in Georgia = 4.10 miles
  8. Interstate 74 in Iowa = 5.36 miles
  9. Interstate 86 in Pennsylvania = 7.00 miles
  10. Interstate 84 in Massachusetts = 8.15 miles
  11. Interstate H-2 in Hawaii = 8.33 miles
  12. Interstate 82 in Oregon = 11.01 miles
  13. Interstate 93 in Vermont = 11.014 miles
  14. Interstate 59 in Louisiana = 11.48 miles
  15. Interstate 81 in Maryland = 12.03 miles
  16. Interstate 55 in Tennessee = 12.28 miles
  17. Interstate 87 in North Carolina = 12.90 miles currently (to be extended to Norfolk, VA)
  18. Interstate 99 in New York = 13.08 miles
  19. Interstate 70 in West Virginia = 14.45 miles
  20. Interstate 44 in Texas = 14.77 miles
  21. Interstate H-3 in Hawaii = 15.32 miles
  22. Interstate 95 in New Hampshire = 16.11 miles
  23. Interstate 97 in Maryland = 17.62 miles
  24. Interstate 74 in Ohio = 19.47 miles currently (a future extension to the southeast from Cincinnati is planned)
  25. Interstate 59 in Georgia = 20.67 miles
  26. Interstate 57 in Missouri = 22.33 miles currently (an extension to Poplar Bluff and Little Rock is under construction)
  27. Interstate 95 in Delaware =23.43 miles
  28. Interstate 95 in New York = 23.50 miles
  29. Interstate 14 in Texas = 24.80 miles currently (proposed to be extended to the east and west)
  30. Interstate 81 in West Virginia = 26.00 miles
  31. Interstate H-1 in Hawaii = 27.16 miles
  32. Interstate 15 in Arizona  = 29.39 miles
  33. Interstate 68 in West Virginia – 31.50 miles currently (proposed to be extended west)
  34. Interstate 24 in Illinois = 38.73 miles
  35. Interstate 64 in Missouri = 40.60 miles
  36. Interstate 95 in Rhode Island = 42.36 miles
  37. Interstate 95 in Pennsylvania = 44.25 miles
  38. Interstate 94 in Indiana = 46.13 miles
  39. Interstate 93 in Massachusetts = 46.25 miles
  40. Interstate 90 in Pennsylvania = 46.40 miles
  41. Interstate 2 in Texas – 46.80 miles currently (proposed to be extended to Laredo, TX)
  42. Interstate 26 in North Carolina = 53.00 miles
  43. Interstate 26 in Tennessee = 54.00 miles
  44. Interstate 84 in Pennsylvania = 54.55 miles
  45. Interstate 91 in Massachusetts = 54.90 miles
  46. Interstate 91 in Connecticut = 58.00 miles
  47. Interstate 94 in Illinois = 61.53 miles
  48. Interest 86 in Idaho – 62.85 miles
  49. Interstate 19 in Arizona = 63.43 miles
  50. Interstate 55 in Louisiana = 65.81 miles
  51. Interstate 77 in Virginia = 66.27 miles
  52. Interstate 10 in Alabama = 66.31 miles
  53. Interstate 78 in New Jersey = 67.83 miles
  54. Interstate 85 in Virginia = 68.64 miles
  55. Interstate 84 in New York = 71.79 miles
  56. Interstate 55 in Arkansas = 72.22 miles
  57. Interstate 90 in Idaho = 73.55 miles
  58. Interstate 66 in Virginia = 74.8 miles

SOURCES: 

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