Favorite names of mesas in America’s Old West


 

Enchanted Mesa, New Mexico

There are certain names and terms that conjour up images of places. In the vast, rugged, and lovely landscapes of the American West, mesas are one of the most iconic topographic and geologic features. While in the process of preparing a separate post, I came to enjoy and appreciate some fun, historic, ominous, and truly iconic names for the majestic mesas dotting the West. Here’s my list of my favorite names, presented in alphabetical order – I hope you enjoy them, too. Other interesting mesa names will be added as they are discovered.

  • Azotea (Rooftop) Mesa
  • Battlement Mesa
  • Big Chief Mesa
  • Bighorn Mesa
  • Bobtail Mesa
  • Bridger Jack Mesa – sounds like a mountain man’s name – one of my favorites

Bridger Jack Mesa – Source: suwa.org

  • Buckboard Mesa
  • Buckskin Mesa
  • Burro Mesa
  • Button Mesa – cute as a button
  • Calamity Mesa – a terrific name that reeks of the Old West

Calamity Mesa – Source – listsofjohn.com

  • Cannon Ball Mesa
  • Casa del Eco (Eco House) Mesa
  • Cattle Garden Mesa
  • Checkerboard Mesa – if you’ve been to Zion National Park, you’ve probably seen this (see photo at the end of the post)
  • Cimarron Mesa – a truly western term
  • Ciruela (Plum) Mesa
  • Cisco Mesa
  • Coyote Mesa – wouldn’t be the Old West without coyotes
  • Devil’s Grave Mesa
  • Dick Mesa – no comment
  • Dude Mesa – nice to see something named for Mr. Lebowski.
  • Eagle Tail Mesa
  • Enchanted Mesa – one of my favorite names; and of course located in New Mexico (see photo at the top of the post)
  • Five Pine Mesa
  • Flat Iron Mesa
  • Floating Mesa
  • Found Mesa – was it lost?
  • Grand Mesa – largest in the world in land area
  • Gut Ache Mesa
  • Hanging Mesa – ominous name
  • Hell Roaring Mesa – now this is a truly Western name!
  • Hideout Mesa – wonder if Butch  and Sundance are there?
  • Horse Pasture Mesa
  • Horse Shoe Mesa
  • Juniper Mesa
  • Kicking Foot Mesa – sounds like an awesome name for a Native American Chief
  • Lobo (Wolf) Mesa
  • Loco Mesa – now that’s a crazy name!
  • Love Mesa – soon to be a TV show on your network, along with Boat Mesa
  • Mail Trail Mesa
  • Mesa del Toro (Bull Mesa)
  • Mesa Encantada (Haunted Mesa)
  • Mesa Inclinado (Inclined Mesa)
  • Mesa Malpais (Bad Country Mesa) – great name
  • Mesa Palo Amarillo (Yellow Stick Mesa) – ditto
  • Mesita del Buey (Little Mesa of the Good) – double ditto
  • Mess Box Mesa
  • Mockingbird Mesa
  • Mocassin Mesa
  • Music Mesa – “the mesas’ are alive with the sound of music”
  • Mustang Mesa
  • No Man Mesa
  • No Name Mesa
  • North Star Mesa
  • Orchard Mesa
  • Pinon Mesa
  • Poison Spider Mesa – yikes!
  • Purdy Mesa – “well, ain’t she purdy?”
  • Razor Blade Mesa
  • Rock Door Mesa
  • Rock Pile Mesa
  • Scenic Mesa
  • Secret Mesa – then how does anyone know about it?
  • Sentinel Mesa – another favorite of mine

Sentinel Mesa in Utah – Source: tripadvisor.com

  • Shamrock Mesa
  • Shirttail Mesa
  • Silvercrest Mesa
  • Skeleton Mesa – another ominous name
  • Slaughter Mesa – yet another ominous name
  • Snowbird Mesa
  • Snowshoe Mesa
  • Steamboat Mesa
  • Stoner Mesa – what were they smoking up there?
  • Stovepipe Mesa
  • Sunflower Mesa – I like this one too
  • Sunlight Mesa
  • Sunshine Mesa
  • Tenderfoot Mesa – a term that epitomizes the Old West
  • Ticaboo Mesa
  • Tin Cup Mesa
  • Urraca Mesa (Magpie Mesa)
  • Vermillion Mesa
  • Wagon Box Mesa
  • Whitewater Mesa
  • Wildcat Mesa
  • Wildhorse Mesa
  • Wild Oat Mesa
  • Wild Sheep Mesa
  • Wild Steer Mesa

Checkerboard Mesa in Zion National Park , Utah

SOURCE: topozone.com

If the geology, geography, and history of the American Southwest interests you too, here are a couple of resources available on Amazon.com.*

http://  http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Posted in fun, geography, Geology, hiking, historic preservation, history, Maps, Native Americans, nature, place names, recreation, topography, toponymy, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Beautiful fungi and mushrooms of Power Island


 

Power Island – pinterest.com

Power Island (previously known as Marion Island or Ford Island) is a 202 acre island that is located approximately one mile west of Old Mission Peninsula in the West Arm of Grand Traverse Bay. This heavily wooded preserve has a surprisingly varied terrain, rising 230 feet above the bay waters. While hiking the island two (2) weekends ago after a 3.5 mile boat ride from Bowers Harbor, we discovered an amazing array of fungi and mushrooms.

Here are some photos of these colorful and interesting fungi. I’ve only been able to identify a few of them, so any help or suggestions would be most appreciated. As always, wild mushrooms and fungi should never be eaten unless you are absolutely certain of its identity and have confirmed it is not poisonous. Enjoy the photographs.

Coral fungus – They almost look like french fries in a box.

Annual Shelf fungus (two on the left)

Possible Russula

Russula

Golden Chanterelle

Boletus (Snell)  mushroom

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If fungi and mushrooms are an interesting topic to you, here are a couple of helpful resources available through Amazon.com.*

http://  http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in environment, fun, geography, Great Lakes, hiking, nature, Science, topography, Wildlife | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s largest “stad” and “sted” suffix cities


Zaanstad, Netherlands’ unique City Hall – Source: pinterest.com

“Stad” and “sted” have similar meanings of city, town, or place. “Sted” is only found in use in Denmark, while “stad” can be found in the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, South Africa, Aruba, and Curacao. Aruba, Curacao, and South Africa are/were all Dutch colonies or territories.

  1. Kroonstad (Crown City), South Africa = 168,762 (2011)
  2. Zaanstad (Zaan City),Netherlands = 155,855 (2019)
  3. Willemstad (William’s City), Curacao = 150,000 (2013 estimate)
  4. Fredrikstad (Frederick’s City), Norway = 82,301 (2019)
  5. Lelystad (Lely City), Netherlands = 77,892 (2019)
  6. Halmstad (Straw City), Sweden = 70,480 (2019)
  7. Karlstad (Karl’s City), Sweden = 60,492 (2015)
  8. Kokstad (Kok’s City), South Africa = 51,561 (2011)
  9. Kristianstad (Christian’s City), Sweden = 40,145 (2016)
  10. Oranjestad (Orange City), Aruba = 34,980 (2015)
  11. Ystad, Sweden = 28,985 (2015)
  12. Mathibestad, South Africa = 25,945 (2011)
  13. Pampierstad, South Africa = 21,707 (2011)
  14. Hoopstad, South Africa = 16,033 (2011)
  15. Mariestad (Marie’s City), Sweden = 15,591 (2010)
  16. Thisted, Denmark = 13,536 (2020)
  17. Grimstad, Norway = 12,622 (2016)
  18. Filipstad (Phillip’s City), Sweden = 10,644 (2019)
  19. Grindsted, Denmark = 9,782 (2020)
  20. Hundested, Denmark = 8,616 (2020)
  21. Stromstad, Sweden = 6,288 (2010)
  22. Ramokokastad, South Africa = 5,141 (2011)
  23. Leeudoringstad (Lion Thorn City), South Africa = 5,-54 (2011)
  24. Venterstad (Hawker City), South Africa = 4,989 (2011)
  25. Graested, Denmark = 3,674 (2020)
  26. Wolmaransstad (Wolmaran’s City), South Africa = 3,633 (2011)
  27. Willemstad (William’s City), Netherlands = 3,125 (?)

SOURCES:

  • en.wikipedia.org for each country and city listed above
  • maps.google.com
Posted in Africa, cities, culture, Europe, history, Language, Maps, North America, Statistics | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s largest “Old” cities and towns


Source: pinterest.com

After listing the largest “New” cities across the globe back on July 16th, this post identifies the largest “Old” cities. There is a fairly wide range in population on this list as a minimum of 3,000 was required for inclusion. If additional candidate cities/towns are identified, the minimum may be increased over time.

Eskisehir, Turkey – Source: gostudyturkey.com

Nearly 25 nations are represented, as is every continent except Antarctica. Any suggestions, additions, or corrections are most welcome, particularly for “old” city names using Asian and African languages.

  1. Eskişehir (Old City), Turkey = 734,807 (2016)
  2. Porto Velho (Old Port), Brazil = 519,531 (2018 estimate)
  3. Vila Velha (Old Town), Brazil = 486,208 (2018 estimate)
  4. Stary Oskol (Old Oskol), Russia = 224,153 (2018 estimate)
  5. Oldenburg, Germany = 168,210 (2018)
  6. Stara Zagora (Old Zagora), Bulgaria = 158,563 (2015)
  7. Oldham, England, UK = 96,555 (2011)
  8. Mission Viejo (Old Mission), CA, USA = 94,381 (2019 estimate)
  9. El Viejo (The Old), Nicaragua = 76,775 (2005)
  10. Stargard (Oldtown), Poland= 70,534 (2006)
  11. Palaio Faliro (Old Phalerum), Greece = 64,021 (2011)
  12. Oudtshoorn, South Africa = 61,507 (2011)
  13. Aliso Viejo (Old Alder), CA, USA = 50,887 (2019 estimate)
  14. Starachowice (Old Chowice), Poland = 49,513 (2017)
  15. Starogard Gdański (Oldtown in Gdanski), Poland = 48,136 (2006)
  16. Antiguo Cuscatlán (Old Jeweled City), El Salvador = 48,027 (2010)
  17. Antigua (Old/Ancient), Guatemala = 46,054 (2018)
  18. Barotac Viejo (Old Barotac), Philippines = 45,808 (2015)
  19. Tafi Viejo, Argentina = 39,601 (2010)
  20. Starokostiantyniv (Old Constantine’s Town), Ukraine = 34,429 (2019)
  21. Ciudad Vieja (Old City), Guatemala = 33,405 (2018)
  22. Altenburg (Old Castle), Germany = 32,074 (2018)
  23. Oldenzaal (Old Hall), Netherlands = 31,840 (2019)
  24. Oudenaarde (Old Field), Belgium = 31,132 (2018)
  25. Old Harbour, Jamaica = 28,912 (2011)
  26. Chillan Viejo (Old Screech), Chile = 28,375 (2012)
  27. Oudewater (Old Water), Netherlands = 20,201 (2019)
  28. Stara Pazova (Old Grooves), Serbia = 18,602 (2011)
  29. Eskil (Old ?), Turkey = 17,044 (2012)
  30. Altena, Germany = 16,922 (2018)
  31. Altdorf bei Nürnberg (Old Village at Nürnberg), Germany = 15,245 (2018)
  32. Oldsmar, FL, USA = 15,061 (2019 estimate)
  33. Oldbury, England, UK = 13,606 (2011)
  34. Tanque de la Vieja, Mexico 12,585 (estimate)
  35. Atlstatten, Switzerland = 11,730 (2018)
  36. Antigua (Old/Ancient), Canary Islands = 11,629 (2013)
  37. Altensteig (Old Rise), Germany = 10,799 (2018)
  38. Old Saybrook, CT, USA = 10,242 (2010)
  39. Oldenburg in Holstein, Germany = 9,833 (2018)
  40. Altlandsberg (Old Land’s Mountain), Germany = 9,490 (2018)
  41. Altdorf (Old Village), Switzerland = 9,401 (2018)
  42. Oudenburg (Old Castle), Belgium= 9,300 (2018)
  43. Staryi Kym (Old Kym), Ukraine = 9,277 (2014)
  44. Stary Sącz (Old Sacz), Poland = 9,200 (2010)
  45. Olds, AB, Canada = 9,184 (2016)
  46. Old Orchard Beach, ME = 8,666 (2012 estimate)
  47. Rio Viejo (Old River), Colombia = 8,125 (2018)
  48. Sauce Viejo (Old Willow), Argentina = 8,213 (2010)
  49. Old Colwyn, Wales = 8,113 (2011)
  50. Altenberg (Old Mountain), Germany and Old Forge, PA, USA (tie) = 7,937 (2018)
  51. Old Lyme, CT, USA = 7,603 (2010)
  52. Old Town, ME, USA = 7,518 (2016 estimate)
  53. Old Jefferson, LA, USA = 6,980 (2010)
  54. Old Greenwich, CT, USA = 6,611 (2010)
  55. Staryi Sambir, Ukraine= 6,446 (2013)
  56. Altenkirchen (Old Church), Germany = 6,263 (2018)
  57. Old Bethpage, NY, USA = 5,523 (2010)
  58. Altentreptow (Old Treptow), Germany = 5,307 (2018)
  59. Old Westbury, NY, USA = 4,671 (2010)
  60. Tanque Viejo (Old Tank/Cistern), Mexico = 4,420 (estimate)
  61. Palaiokastritsa (Old Castle Place), Greece = 4,068 (2011)
  62. Old Beach, Tasmania, Australia = 3,779 (2016)
  63. Old Mystic, CT, USA = 3,554 (2010)
  64. Old Farm MD, USA = 3,450 (2010)
  65. Palaia Fokaia (Old Phocaea), Greece = 3,436 (2011)

SOURCES:

Posted in Africa, Asia, cities, Europe, geography, Latin America, North America, Oceania, place names, South America, toponymy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tuesday Tunes: “Folklore” by Taylor Swift is outstanding


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(*see note at bottom of post)

Until last Friday (July 24), I was not a big Taylor Swift fan. I enjoyed an occasional song, especially since the release of her album 1989, but I would never have been considered a fan. This was mostly because the majority of her music falls into a category or genre that I don’t typically enjoy or listen to – pop and/or country. I’m more a Alternative Rock or Indie fan. So, when I read a lot of positive buzz about Folklore, I decided to give it a listen.

Taylor Swift and Bon Iver – Source: vulture.com

The first song I heard, cardigan, worried me some, as it sounded just a bit too much like what I have heard from Taylor Swift previously. But, when I listened to exile, I was instantly captivated by the beauty and heartbreak of that Indie track. It is easily one of the saddest and most emotional songs I’ve ever heard and it is done so, so well as a duet by Taylor and Bon Iver. The lyrics to exile are simply breathtaking.

Aaron Dessner and Taylor Swift – Source: iheartradio.com

From then on, through all the other tracks (eleven of which were co-written with Aaron Dessner of The National), I greatly enjoyed the album. I have even grown to appreciate cardigan more with added listens. Honestly, here is not a single bad song on Folklore and many superior ones.

My favorite tracks on Folklore, include:

  • exile – likely candidate for song of the year!
  • mirrorball
  • epiphany – beautiful tune dedicated to those fighting Covid-19
  • my tears ricochet
  • the 1
  • cardigan
  • illicit affairs
  • this is me trying
  • betty

2020 has been a stinky year in many respects, but in terms of exiting new music, the past month or so have been outstanding with superb releases by Phoebe Bridgers (Punisher), The Chicks (Gaslighter), and now Taylor Swift (Folklore). All three (3) of these albums should make the shortlist for Album of the Year at the Grammys and each has a strong candidate for Song of the Year, too:

If these there (3) albums interest you, here are visual links to the ones by Phoebe Bridgers and The Chicks on Amazon.com.* The link to Folklore by Taylor Swift on Amazon.com is provided at the top of the post.

http://

http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

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Winged insects found on driftwood


We spent the afternoon at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in the Northwest Lower Peninsula of Michigan. While wandering the beach at North Bar Lake, I was surprised by the interesting variety of winged insects found on recently beached piece of driftwood.

Normally, most driftwood appears rather dry and sterile, but this tree trunk-sized driftwood (see photo above) was resting right at the water’s edge. It was occupied by quite a range of flying specimens. Whether they were partaking the moisture in the wood or soaking up some sunshine in an elevated place, I don’t know. Here are the photos. Any help with identifying some of these would be most appreciated. Enjoy!

Green Lacewing with a mosquito to the right in this photo.

Unknown winged insect – any help welcomed

Five-banded Thynnid Wasp – species identified 7/24/20

Brown Stinkbug

Pink-spotted Lady Beetle

Banded Tussock Moth (Pale Tiger Moth) – species identified 7/24/20

SOURCES:

Posted in Animals, environment, fun, insects, nature, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Toasting the States with the most wineries in 2020 vs. 2018


American wine regions – Source: vineyards.com

As the data shows in the following chart, among the states with the most wineries, Colorado and Texas lead the way in the number of new wineries added over the past two (2) years. All 12 states saw growth in wineries and none come close the numbers found in California. Washington moved ahead of Oregon and Pennsylvania passed Virginia during this time period, but their numbers are so close it is likely they will occasionally swap positions back and forth for some time. Cheers!

Stylish Colorado wine tasting in Grand Junction – Source: visitgrandjunction.com/tips-wine-tasting

RANK    STATE         2020/2018                    2-YR GROWTH

  1. California = 4,613 wineries/4501 wineries          +2.5%
  2. Washington = 812 wineries/792 wineries           +2.5%
  3. Oregon = 809 wineries/793 wineries                   + 2.0%
  4. New York = 411 wineries/403 wineries                +2.0%
  5. Texas = 406 wineries/353 wineries                     +15.0%
  6. Pennsylvania = 308 wineries/285 wineries         +8.1%
  7. Virginia = 307 wineries/291 wineries                    +5.5%
  8. Ohio = 280 wineries/254 wineries                       +10.2%
  9. Michigan = 211 wineries/191 wineries                 +10.5%
  10. North Carolina = 175 wineries/171 wineries         +2.3%
  11. Missouri = 154 wineries/149 wineries                   +3.4%
  12. Colorado = 150 wineries/127 wineries                 +18.1%

Chateau Chantal on Old Mission Peninsula, Michigan – Source: laketolake.com

If wineries are your thing, here’s a link to a guide to wineries across the country that’s available on Amazon.com*

http://

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in agriculture, art, branding, cities, commerce, consumerism, Cuisine, culture, economic development, economic gardening, environment, food systems, fun, geography, Geology, historic preservation, history, land use, Maps, placemaking, planning, Small business, States, Statistics, third places, topography, tourism, Trade, Travel | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Tuesday tunes: Summerish band/musician names


Source: zazzle.com

Here’s a list of the bands/musicians whose name reminds one of summer. It is kind of surprising how few there are/were given how popular surfing was in the fifties and sixties and how many summer music festivals there were prior to Covid-19. Any additions, suggestions, or corrections to this list are most welcome. Enjoy!

  • 5 Seconds of Summer (Australia)
  • August Alsina (USA)
  • Beach Boys (USA)
  • Beach Fossils (USA)
  • Blue Hawaiians (USA)
  • Canned Heat (USA)
  • Celtic Thunder (Ireland)
  • Donna Summer (USA)
  • Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons (USA – they qualify for all four seasons)
  • Great Lake Swimmers (Canada)
  • Hot Hot Heat (Canada)
  • How to Swim (Scotland)
  • Iron Butterfly (USA)
  • July Talk ( Canada)
  • June Carter Cash (USA)
  • KC & the Sunshine Band (USA)
  • Runaway June (USA)
  • Summer Walker (USA)
  • Sunny Day Real Estate (USA)
  • Surf City (New Zealand)
  • Surf Coasters (Japan)
  • Surf Punks (USA)
  • Surfer Blood (USA)
  • Sweethearts of the Rodeo (USA)
  • The Beaches (Canada)
  • The Outfield (England)
  • The Ruby Suns (New Zealand)
  • The Summerlad (Canada)
  • The Sunny Cowgirls (Australia)
  • The Sunrays (USA)
  • The Surfaris (USA)

SOURCES: 

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Two ideologies, two plutonium programs, and too reckless!


http://

(*see note at bottom of the post)

The more read about the Cold War, the more I am convinced that both sides lost. Not only did both the Americans and Soviets/Russians gut large parts of their economies by wasting trillions in a fear-based bogeyman paranoia of capitalism versus communism, but they each poisoned thousands, if not millions, of their own citizens in a reckless attempt to thwart the other ideology.

Mayak Production Site nuclear facilities in south-central Russia – Source: virtualglobetrotting.com

The outstanding book, http://Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

*, by Kate Brown carefully documents this reckless behavior in a fascinating way – through comparing the history and culture of both the American and Soviet plutonium programs by concentrating on the primary cities developed specifically by each government for the production of that deadly weapons-grade material – Richland, Washington adjacent to the Hanford Site in south-central Washington state and Ozersk, Russia adjacent to the Mayak Production Site in south-central Russia.

Hanford Site nuclear facilities – Source: virtualglobetrotting.com

What she finds is both the Americans and the Soviets/Russians followed:

  • the same no-holds-barred tactical and strategic approaches;
  • the same loose developmental and operational protocols with limited protective redundancies;
  • the same reckless disregard for the environment (such as the Columbia River or the Techa River), as well as for concerned residents of downwind communities;
  • the same unsafe and reckless behavior towards the health and safety of construction crews, clean-up crews, employees and their families, as well as area residents;
  • the same mismanagement and lack of regulatory oversight;
  • the same secretive and authoritarian attitudes towards any dissent;
  • the same tossing of money down a corrupt and endless rabbit hole;
  • the same profiteering, whether by managers or corporations;
  • the same defensiveness whenever questioned;
  • the same disastrous results that radiated and poisoned a significant area for thousands of years; and
  • the same half-baked response to environmental degradation – convert some of the poisoned areas into biological/radiological research zones that will have limited access for thousands of years.

In other words, both capitalist and communist approaches have failed miserably and have demonstrated they are more alike than different when it comes to plutonium safety – it just depends on whether you want a corporate/government partnership operation or solely a government-run operation. Both continually ended up with the same failed results.

This sign slogan would be fine, if it weren’t so bogus for so many years. – Source: crosscut.com

I won’t go into greater details, as many of them, particularly the effects of radiation poisoning on children will make you sick to your stomach. Other details will make you shake your head in disbelief, while some will make you downright angry. Regardless of the impact this book has on you, it is imperative that concerned citizens of all nations learn from these tragic and often willful mishaps.

Areas directly impacted by the deliberate release of radiation from the Hanford Site in 1949 – Source: counterpunch.org

Secretive operations, by their very nature are often conduits for lies, misdeeds, corruption, and disasters. Being secretive makes it too easy to hide, hush, bury, deny, or burn the evidence. Rigorous oversight, even if it must be classified, is imperative to assure public safety. Blind allegiance does no one any good except for those who have something to hide.

_________________

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Here are a couple of other books available through Amazon.com on this topic that may be of interest.*

http:// http:// http://

Posted in atomic age, book reviews, books, cities, civics, culture, economic development, energy, environment, geography, government, health, Health care, history, humanity, infrastructure, injustice, land use, Maps, military, peace, place names, planning, politics, pollution, product design, rivers/watersheds, Russia, Science, social equity, Statistics, technology, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s largest “New” cities


The following list identifies the largest cities in the world that have “new” incorporated into their name. A minimum population threshold of 50,000 residents was used for creating the list.

Magnificent railway station in Novosibirsk – Source: commons.wikimedia.org

Nineteen (19) nations are represented on this list, when separating Wales, England, and Northern Ireland out from the United Kingdom. All continents are represented except for Antarctica. The USA has the most cities on the list with 14, followed by Russia with 12, and Germany with five (5). Any corrections, additions, or suggestions are welcome. Enjoy!

  1. New York City, NY, USA = 8,336,817 (2019 estimate)
  2. Novosibirsk (New Siberia), Russia = 1,618,039 (2019 estimate)
  3. Nizhny Novgorod (Nizhny Newtown), Russia = 1,253,511 (2019 estimate)
  4. Pekanbaru (New Market), Indonesia = 1,121,562 (2019) – added 7/31/20
  5. Navi Mumbai (New Mumbai/Bombay), India = 1,119,488 (2011)
  6. Cartagena (New Carthage), Colombia 914,552 (2020) – Thank you, Dan!
  7. Nova Iguaçu, Brazil = 818,875 (2018 estimate)
  8. Novokuznetsk (New Smith’s), Russia = 552,105 (2019 estimate)
  9. Villa Nueva, Guatemala = 433,734 (2018) – added 7/24/20
  10. New Orleans, LA, USA = 390,144 (2019 estimate)
  11. Nuevo Laredo (New Laredo), Mexico = 373,725 (2010)
  12. Newcastle, Australia = 322,278 (2016) Thank you, Garry!
  13. Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK = 302,820 (2019 estimate)
  14. New Cairo, Egypt = 298,343 (2011)
  15. Newark, NJ, USA = 282,011 (2019 estimate)
  16. Novorossiysk (New Russia), Russia = 275,197 (2019 estimate)
  17. Porto-Novo (Newport), Benin = 264,320 (2013)
  18. New Delhi, India = 257,803 (2011)
  19. Novi Sad (New Orchard), Serbia = 250,439 (2011)
  20. Banjarbaru (New Banjar), Indonesia = 248,423 (2017) – added 7/31/20
  21. Novo Hamburgo (New Hamburg), Brazil = 246,452 (2018 estimate)
  22. Novgorod (Newtown), Russia = 224,297 (2019 estimate)
  23. Cartagena (New Carthage), Spain = 213,914 (2018) – Thank you, Dan!
  24. Novi Beograd (New Belgrade), Serbia = 212,104 (2011)
  25. Novo Friburgo (New Friburg), Brazil = 184,786 (2015)
  26. Newport News, VA, USA = 179,225 (2019 estimate)
  27. Novocherkassk (New Cherkassk), Russia = 167,355 (2019 estimate)
  28. New Borg El Arab, Egypt = 150,230 (2011)
  29. New Haven , CT, USA = 130,250 (2019 estimate)
  30. Newport, Wales, UK = 128,060 (2018)
  31. Novocheboksarsk, Russia = 126,794 (2019 estimate)
  32. Novomoskovsk (New town in the Moskov Region), Russia = 123,211 (2019 estimate)
  33. Novy Urengoy, Russia = 116,938 (2019 estimate)
  34. Nova Gama, Brazil = 115,711 (2019 estimate) – added 7/25/20
  35. Novapolotsk (New River Joining), Belarus = 108,000 (2015)
  36. Novoshakhtinsk, Russia = 107,539 (2019 estimate)
  37. Nova Serrana (New Mountain), Brazil = 103,617 (2020 estimate)
  38. Novi Pazar (New Bazaar), Serbia = 100,410 (2011)
  39. New Bedford, MA, USA = 95,363 (2019 estimate)
  40. New Braunfels, TX, USA = 90,209 (2019 estimate)
  41. Newton, MA, USA = 88,414 (2019 estimate)
  42. Nova Lima (New Lima), Brazil = 87,391 (2013)
  43. Newport Beach, CA, USA 84,534 (2019 estimate)
  44. Newmarket, ON, Canada = 84,224 (2016)
  45. Nowy Sącz (New Sacz), Poland = 83,794 (2019 estimate)
  46. Novouralsk (New town in the Urals), Russia = 80,723 (2019 estimate)
  47. Neumunster (New Cathedral), Germany = 79,487 (2018)
  48. New Rochelle, NY, USA = 78,557 (2019 estimate)
  49. Newcastle-under-Lyme, England, UK -= 75,082 (2011)
  50. Novoaltaysk, Russia = 73,769 (2019 estimate)
  51. New Britain, CT, USA = 72,495 (2019 estimate)
  52. New Westminster, BC, Canada = 70,996 (2016)
  53. Novomoskovsk (New town in the Moskov Region), Ukraine = 70,550 (2019 estimate)
  54. Nueve Guinea, Nicaragua = 66,936 (2005) – added 7/24/20
  55. Villanova i la Geltru, Spain = 66,274 (2018) – Thank you, Dan!
  56. Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland, UK = 65,646 (2011)
  57. Ponte Nova (New Bridge), Brazil = 65,000 (estimate)
  58. Neuwied, Germany = 64,574 (2018)
  59. Neubrandenburg (New Brandenburg), Germany = 64,086 (2018)
  60. Nieuwegein (New Meadow), Netherlands = 63,036 (2019)
  61. Villeneuve d’Ascq (Newtown of Arcq), France = 61,920 (2015) – added 7/23/20
  62. Neu-Ulm, Germany = 58,707 (2018)
  63. Nuevo Loja (Old Store), Ecuador = 57,727 (2010) – added 7/25/20
  64. Novohrad-Volynskyi, Ukraine = 56,108 (2019 estimate)
  65. New Brunswick, NJ, USA= 55,676 (2019 estimate)
  66. Nowa Huta (New Steel Mill), Poland = 54,588 (2014)
  67. Neustadt an der Weinstraße (New City on the Weinstraße), Germany = 53,148 (2018)
  68. West New York, NJ, USA = 52,273 (2019 estimate)
  69. Novovolynsk (New Town in the Volyn Region), Ukraine = 51,564 (2019 estimate)
  70. Newark, OH, USA = 50,315 (2019 estimate)

SOURCES:

  • en.wkipedia.org for each city
  • maps.google.com
  • translate.google.com
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