Smaller Cities with Taller Skylines


 

Atlantic, City, NJ – Source teipadvisor.com

None of these cities currently exceed 100,000 in population, but they each have a surprising number of tall buildings dotting their downtown area skyline. This post is dedicated to these smaller cities who are reaching for the stars…so to speak.

Wilmington, DE – Source: en.wikipedia.org

Please note – Not included on the list are beachfront or university-related towers or casinos that are not located in or close to downtown. High-rises located in the suburbs are also not included in this list.

Sarasota, FL – Source: roberttheartist.com

The following cities with less than 100,000 people have the most tall buildings of 150 feet in height or greater in or about their downtown core.

  1. Atlantic City, NJ = 25+ (could not find data for buildings under 222 feet)
  2. Albany, NY and Wilmington, DE = 23 (Albany added on 7/16/19)
  3. Fort Myers, FL and Sarasota, FL = 16
  4. Harrisburg, PA = 14
  5. Charleston, WV = 13
  6. Greenville, SC = 10
  7. Reading, PA = 9
  8. Fall River, MA = 7
  9. Canton, OH; Champaign, IL; and Flint, MI= 6 (Canton added on 7/16/19)
  10. Bartlesville, OK = 5
  11. Asheville, NC; Battle Creek, MI; Biloxi, MS; Binghamton, NY; Iowa City, IA; Jackson, MI; and Lake Charles, LA = 4

The smallest city on the list is Montpelier, Vermont with an estimated population of 7,436 in 2018. It is followed by Uniontown, Pennsylvania at 9,835 residents. Ten (10) cities are on the list that used to exceed 100,000 population. They are Albany, NY; Canton, OH; Fall River, MA; Flint, MI; New Bedford, MA; Reading, PA; Scranton, PA; Trenton, NJ; Wilmington, DE; and Youngstown, OH. Meanwhile, three (3) cities that are on the threshold of passing the 100,000 are , Asheville, NC; Bellingham, WA; and Yakima, WA.

 

Albany, NY – commons.wikimedia.org

What is interesting is how many of these tall buildings were built more than 50 years ago, many of them right around the time of the Great Depression. Cities that once exceeded 100,000 in population are identified in italics.

As always, please feel free to class along any additions, corrections, or suggestions. Enjoy!

Updated 7/16/19 – added Albany, NY; Canton, OH; Decatur, IL; and Springfield OH.

HEIGHT        BUILDING (YEAR)           CITY, STATE            CITY POPULATION

  • 710′             Ocean Resort (2012)                    Atlantic City, NJ             37,804 (2018 est.)
  • 589′           Corning Tower (1973)          Albany, NY                  97,279 (2018 est.)
  • 525′            Harrah’s Tower (2008)                Atlantic City, NJ
  • 470′            Taj Mahal Executive (2008)       Atlantic City, NJ
  • 457′            The Water Club (2008)                Atlantic City, NJ
  • 431′            Borgata Hotel (2003)                   Atlantic City, NJ
  • 429′            Taj Mahal Casino (1990)             Atlantic City, NJ
  • 388′          State Office Bldg. (1930)       Albany, NY
  • 375′            Bally’s (1989)                                  Atlantic City, NJ
  • 370′            Claridge Tower (1930)                 Atlantic City, NJ
  • 368′            High Point I (2007)                      Fort Myers, FL                  82,254 (2018 est.)
  • 367′            High Point II (2007)                     Fort Myers, FL
  • 364′            Tropicana Havana (2004)           Atlantic City, NJ
  • 360′            Ocean Club East (1984)               Atlantic City, NJ
  • 360′            Ocean Club West (1984)              Atlantic City, NJ
  • 346′            Beau Rivage (1999)                        Biloxi, MS                          45,968 (2018 est.)
  • 343′            LaAuberge du Lac Hotel (2005) Lake Charles, LA               78,001 (2018 est.)
  • 341′            333 Market (1978)                         Harrisburg, PA                  49,229 (2018 est.)
  • 340′           Oasis I (2008)                                Fort Myers, FL
  • 340′           Oasis II (2008)                              Fort Myers, FL
  • 335′            Imperial Palace (1997)                 Biloxi, MS
  • 330′           1201 N. Market (1988)                 Wilmington, DE                 70,635 (2018 est.)
  • 321′            Plaza Tower (1984)                        Atlantic City, NJ
  • 314′            Capital One Bank (1984)             Lake Charles, LA
  • 310′          Empire State Plaza (1973)     Albany, NY
  • 310′          Empire State Plaza (1973)     Albany, NY
  • 310′          Empire State Plaza (1973)     Albany, NY
  • 310′          Empire State Plaza (1973)     Albany, NY
  • 306′            Saint Rafael/Riviera (2007)       Fort Myers, FL
  • 306′            Saint Tropez (2007)                     Fort Myers, FL
  • 305′            Landmark Building (1966)         Greenville, SC                      68,563 (2018 eat.)
  • 302′            Atlantic Palace (1987)                  Atlantic City, NJ
  • 300′            Patterson Towers (1967)            Normal, IL                            54,742 (2018 est.)
  • 299′            Caesar’s Centurion (1997)           Atlantic City, NJ
  • 295′             River Tower (2007)                     Wilmington, DE
  • 294′             The Flagship (1987)                     Atlantic City, NJ
  • 292′            Phillips Petroleum (1964)           Bartlesville, OK                   36,423 (2018 est.)
  • 292′            State Capitol (1932)                    Charleston, WV                     47,215 (2018 est.)
  • 291′             Pennsylvania Place (1971)          Harrisburg, PA
  • 288′            Golden Nugget (2014)                 Lake Charles, LA
  • 287′            State Capitol (1928)                     Olympia, WA                        52,555 (2018 est.)
  • 285′            The Enclave (1985)                      Atlantic City, NJ
  • 282′            I.M. Pei Bldg. (1970)                   Wilmington, DE
  • 280′            Beau Rivage (2004)                    Fort Myers, FL
  • 279′            Tropicana West Tower (1996)   Atlantic City, NJ
  • 275′            Margaritaville Resort (1998)     Biloxi, MS
  • 275′            County Courthouse (1932)         Reading, PA                         88,495 (2018 est.)
  • 272′            Wyndham Skyline (1983)          Atlantic City, NJ
  • 272′            State Capitol (1906)                    Harrisburg, PA
  • 270′          Comptroller’s HQ (2001)   Albany, NY
  • 270′            Bella (1988)                                   Atlantic City, NJ
  • 268′            College Corner (2009)                Champaign, IL                     88,029 (2018 est.)
  • 267′            Home Savings Bank (1967) Albany, NY
  • 267′            Hilton Hotel (1980)                     Atlantic City, NJ
  • 267′            HERE (2015)                                 Champaign, IL
  • 265′           100 State Street (1903)        Albany, NY
  • 262′            State Capitol (1917)                      Jefferson City, MO             42,838 (2018 est.)
  • 261′             Ritz-Carlton Hotel (2001)          Sarasota, FL                         57,738 (2018 est.)
  • 260′            Resorts Ocean Tower (1929)      Atlantic City, NJ
  • 260′            Presbyterian Apts. (1968)           Harrisburg, PA
  • 259′             Brandywine Building (1970)     Wilmington, DE
  • 257′             Fulton Bank (1930)                     Harrisburg, PA
  • 255′             State Archives (1964)                   Harrisburg, PA
  • 255′             Towne House Suites (1960)        Harrisburg, PA
  • 254′            Showboat Tower (1987)              Atlantic City, NJ
  • 253′            Citizens Bank (1967)                    Wilmington, DE
  • 252′          One Commerce Plaza (1971) Albany, NY
  • 250′            Plymouth Harbor (1966)             Sarasota, FL
  • 250′            203 E. Main St. (1990)                Spartanburg, SC                 37,644 (2018 est.)
  • 247′            Plaza Building (1987)                   Bartlesville, OK
  • 247′            Pearce Ford Tower (1970)           Bowling Green, KY             68,401 (2018 est.)
  • 247′            Campo Felice (1986)                    Fort Myers, FL
  • 246′            Market Square Plaza (2005)      Harrisburg, PA
  • 245′            Park Plaza (1986)                         Wilmington, DE
  • 242′            State Capitol (1934)                     Bismarck, ND                      73,112 (2018 est.)
  • 241′            First Wausau Tower (2007)        Wausau, WI                         38,580 (2018 est.)
  • 241′            PNC Bank (1987)                          Wilmington, DE
  • 240′            Imperial Tower (?)                       Charleston, WV
  • 239′            The Milton (1931)                         Battle Creek, MI                  51,247 (2018 est.)
  • 238′            Kanawha Valley Bldg (1929)      Charleston, WV
  • 238′            One Liberty Square (1983)         Greenville, SC
  • 238′            300 Delaware Ave. (1970)          Wilmington, DE
  • 233′            Tower Residences (2003)           Sarasota, FL
  • 232′             Battle Creek Tower (1931)          Battle Creek, MI
  • 232′             Calusa Harbor I (1980)               Fort Myers, FL
  • 230′            Riverview Tower (?)                      Fall River, MA                   89,661 (2018 est.)
  • 230′            Ship Cove (?)                                  Fall River, MA
  • 230′            County Tower Building (1929)   Jackson, MI                         32,605 (2018 est.)
  • 230′            Skyrise Apartments (1982)        Kalamazoo, MI                     76,545 (2018 est.)
  • 230′            The Residences (2005)               Wilmington, DE
  • 230′            500 Delaware Ave. (2006)         Wilmington, DE
  • 229′            Penn National Ins. (1997)           Harrisburg, PA
  • 228′            The Arras (1965)                           Asheville, NC                       92,452 (2018 est.)
  • 228′            Phillips Building (1930)              Bartlesville, OK
  • 228′            Bank fo America (1973)                Greenville, SC
  • 228′            Condo on the Bay I (1982)           Sarasota, FL
  • 228′            Condo on the Bay II (1982)         Sarasota, FL
  • 227′             BB&T Square (1976)                    Charleston, WV
  • 227′             Chase Center (1969)                    Charleston, WV
  • 226′            Mott Foundation (1930)              Flint, MI                               95,943 (2018 est.)
  • 226′            County Courthouse (1885)          Lafayette IN                         72,168 (2018 est.)
  • 226′           Three Christiana Centre (1988)    Wilmington, DE
  • 225′          Env. Conservation HQ (2001) Albany, NY
  • 225′            Federal Center (1928)                  Battle Creek, MI
  • 225′            Laidley Tower (1985)                    Charleston, WV
  • 225′            The Jewel (2017)                           Sarasota, FL
  • 225′            Kennedy Apartments (1966)       Troy, NY                               49,374 (2018 est.)
  • 224′            Turnham 310 (2008)                    Champaign, IL
  • 224′            Metropolitan Tower (1929)         Youngstown, OH               64,958 (2018 est.)
  • 223′            State Office Building (1972)        Binghamton, NY                 44,758 (2018 est.)
  • 222′           The Ritz Condos  (1921)                Atlantic City, NJ
  • 220′          State Capitol (1899)               Albany, NY
  • 219′            Labor & Industry Bldg. (1955)    Harrisburg, PA
  • 217′            County Courthouse (1928)          Asheville, NC
  • 217′           Manchester Hall (1965)                 Normal, IL
  • 217′           Hewitt Hall (1965)                          Normal, IL
  • 216′           Rachel Carson Building (1990)   Harrisburg, PA
  • 216′           Echelon on Palm (2018)                Sarasota, FL
  • 216′           Embassy Suites (2018)                  Sarasota, FL
  • 216′           The Vue (2017)                                Sarasota, FL
  • 216′           Westin Hotel (2014)                       Sarasota, FL
  • 215′            Beau Ciel (2003)                            Sarasota, FL
  • 213′           Bellingham Towers (1930)          Bellingham, WA                  90,665 (2018 est.)
  • 213′          69 State Street (1927)            Albany, NY
  • 212′          90 State Street (1930)           Albany, NY
  • 210′          City Hall (1883)                       Albany, NY
  • 210′          A.E, Staley HQ (1930)            Decatur, IL                   71,290 (2018 est.)
  • 210′           State Capitol (1910)                       Frankfort, KY                      27,679 (2018 est.)
  • 210′           Two Waterfront Place (2003)     Morgantown, WV               30,995 (2018 est.)
  • 207′           Huntington Square (1969)          Charleston, WV
  • 207′         Capital Green Apts (1973)     Albany, NY
  • 207′           One Market Square S. (1990)     Harrisburg, PA
  • 206′            Elderly Housing (1965)              Reading, PA
  • 205′            Tower on Third (1972)                Champaign, IL
  • 205′            County Courthouse (1893)         Dubuque, IA                         57,941 (2018 est.)
  • 204′          40 N. Pearl Street (1976)     Albany, NY
  • 204′            Academic Center (2009)            Harrisburg, PA
  • 203′            Department of Labor (1962)      Trenton, NJ                         83,974 (2018 est.)
  • 201′            One Christiana Centre (1988)    Wilmington, DE
  • 200′           Hercules Building (1982)            Wilmington, DE
  • 199′             Alinari at Rosemary (2007)       Sarasota, FL
  • 198′             110 Chenango Place (1981)        Binghamton, NY
  • 198′             Black Building (1926)                 Jackson MI
  • 196′             CMS Energy (2003)                    Jackson, MI
  • 196′            Longaberger Building (1997)     Newark, OH                         50,029 (2018 est.)
  • 196′           County Courthouse (1888)          Terre Haute, IN                   60,753 (2018 est.)
  • 195′            Chancellor Hotel (1981)               Fayetteville, AR                   86,751 (2018 est.)
  • 195′           Regency Towers (1986)                New Bedford, MA               95,315 (2018 est.)
  • 194′           County Services Building (1992) Reading, PA
  • 192′           Griest Building (1925)                  Lancaster, PA                       59,420 (2018 est.)
  • 191′             Hospital Tower (1978)                Altoona, PA                          43,702 (2018 est.)
  • 191′             Price Tower (1956)                      Bartlesville, OK
  • 191′             Adams Building (1950)               Bartlesville, OK
  • 191′             Bank of Delaware (?)                   Wilmington, DE
  • 190′          101 Central Plaza S. (1923)  Canton, OH                 70,458 (2018 est.)
  • 190′             Fifth Third Bank (1930)             Kalamazoo, MI
  • 190′            1350 Main Street (2007)            Sarasota, FL
  • 189′             AT&T Building (1989)               Charleston, WV
  • 189′             Union Building (1911)                Charleston, WV
  • 189′             Three-foot Building (1939)       Meridian, MS                        37,325 (2018 est.)
  • 189′             Sheraton Hotel (1989)               Wilmington, DE
  • 189′             Devon Condos (1963)                Wilmington, DE
  • 189′             Parq at the Square (1960)         Wilmington, DE
  • 189′             The Dorset (1960)                       Wilmington, DE
  • 189′             Park View (1965)                         Wilmington, DE
  • 188′            County Courthouse (1892)         Uniontown, PA                       9,835 (2018 est.)
  • 187′             City Center West (?)                    Charleston, WV
  • 186′             100 Chenango Place (1973)       Binghamton, NY
  • 185′             State Capitol (1832)                     Augusta, ME                         18,681 (2018 est.)
  • 185′              McCalmy Plaza Hotel (1986)    Battle Creek, MI
  • 185′             Point Royale C (1986)                 Fort Myers, FL
  • 185′             Pointe Royale B (1984)               Fort Myers, FL
  • 185′             Pointe Royale A (1981)                Fort Myers, FL
  • 185′             Presbyterian Tower (1964)        Fort Myers, FL
  • 185′            City Hall (1892)                           Lewiston, ME                        35,944 (2018 est.)
  • 185′            Allied Arts Building (1931)         Lynchburg, VA                     82,126 (2018 est.)
  • 185′            Jackson House (1973)                 Paducah, KY                         24,850 (2018 est.)
  • 184′            Two Liberty Square (1986)         Greenville, SC
  • 184′            Wick Building (1910)                  Youngstown, OH
  • 183′            222 Building (1952)                    Appleton, WI                         74,526 (2018 est.)
  • 183′            Bowling Green Tower A (1970)   Bowling Green, KY
  • 183′             Bowling Green Tower B (1970)  Bowling Green, KY
  • 183′             City Hall (1928)                            Jackson, MI
  • 182′             The Exchange (2019)                  Kalamazoo, MI
  • 182′           Skyview Towers (1972)                 Reading, PA
  • 182′            Washington Towers (1967)         Reading, PA
  • 181′             St. Francis Med Center (2007)  Grand Island, NE                51,478 (2018 est.)
  • 181′            RISE at Riverfront (2018)           Iowa City, IA                        76,290 (2018 est.)
  • 180′           City Building (1927)                      Asheville, NC
  • 180′            City Hall (1897)                             Bay City, MI                        33,019 (2018 est.)
  • 180′           Plaza at Five Points (2005)          Sarasota, FL
  • 180′           Carle Hospital (1984)                    Urbana, IL                           42,046 (2018 est.)
  • 179′            Isle of Capri Tower I (1995)         Biloxi, MS
  • 179′            Isle of Capri Tower II (2005)      Biloxi, MS
  • 179′           Point Gloria (1987)                        Fall River, MA
  • 179′           Mitchell Heights (?)                      Fall River, MA 
  • 179′           Cardinal Madeiros Tower (?)      Fall River, MA
  • 179′           Riverside Hall (1981)                    Flint, MI 
  • 179′           State Office Building (1940)        Frankfort, KY
  • 178′          277 Broadway (2005)             Albany, NY
  • 178′          Bliss Lofts (1975)                     Canton, OH
  • 178′           Justice Center (2009)                   Fort Myers, FL
  • 177′            United Center (1984)                   Charleston, WV
  • 177′           Luzerne National Bank (1928)   Wilkes-Barre, PA                 40,806 (2018 est.)
  • 176′         County Office Bldg. (1928)   Albany, NY
  • 176′           Broadway Tower (1931)               Enid, OK                                49,585 (2018 est.)
  • 176′           Quaker Oaks (1929)                      St. Joseph, MO                    75,959 (2018 est.)
  • 175′            Marriott Hotel (1982)                  Charleston, WV
  • 175′            County Courthouse (1906)         Greensburg, PA                   14,192 (2018 est.)
  • 175′            Trinity Towers West (1971)        Melbourne, FL                     82,826 (2018 est.)
  • 175′            Roosevelt House (1973)              Owensboro, KY                    59,809 (2018 est.)
  • 175′             Gabe’s Tower (1963)                   Owensboro, KY
  • 175′            Franklin Towers (1969)              Portland, ME                        66,417 (2018 est.)
  • 174′             Settles Hotel (1930)                    Big Spring, TX                     28,162 (2018 est.)
  • 173′             One North Tower (2013)            Greenville, SC
  • 173′             Rivo at Ringling (2006)              Sarasota, FL
  • 171′             Court Tower (1973)                      Oshkosh, WI                        66,729 (2018 est.)
  • 171′            St. Andrews Towers (1979)         Panama City, FL                  36,908 (2018 est.)
  • 171′            Wilson Tower (?)                          Poplar Bluff, MO                  17,043 (2018 est.)
  • 171′             Hillcrest Tower (?)                       Poplar Bluff, MO
  • 170′            One South Tower (2013)             Greenville, SC
  • 170′            Eisenhower Apartments (1971)  Reading, PA
  • 170′            Rhodes Apartments (1971)         Reading, PA
  • 170′            Wyndham Hotel (1929)             Reading, PA
  • 170′            Torrington Tower (1973)           Torrington, CT                      34,228 (2018 est.)
  • 170′            Carteret Arms (1960)                  Trenton, NJ
  • 169′             Hyatt Place (2018)                      Iowa City, IA
  • 168′            Zuelke Building (1932)               Appleton, WI
  • 168′          Renkert Bldg. (1913)             Canton, OH
  • 168′            Le Claire Apts (1922)                   Moline, IL                             41,902 (2018 est.)
  • 168′            Westin Harborview (1928)        Portland, ME
  • 168′             The Tower (1945)                        Yakima, WA                          93,884 (2018 est.)
  • 167′            Shields Hall (1996)                      Bremerton, WA                     41,235 (2018 est.)
  • 167′            Aloft Hotel (2015)                        Greenville, SC
  • 167′            Poinsett Plaza (1999)                  Greenville, SC
  • 167′           The Rise at Chauncey (2019)      West Lafayette, IN              48,308 (2018 est.)
  • 166′          Onesto Lofts (1930)               Canton, OH
  • 166′           Illini Tower (1967)                        Champaign, IL
  • 166′            SC Johnson Tower (1950)          Racine, WI                            77,432 (2018 est.)
  • 166′            Schuyler Apartments (1950)      Spartanburg, SC
  • 165′          Key Bank (1922)                     Canton, OH
  • 165′            Independence Tower (1930)      Enid, OK
  • 165′            State Capitol (1902)                     Helena, MT                          32,315 (2018 est.)
  • 165′           The Mohican (1896)                     New London, CT                 26,939 (2018 est.)
  • 165′            WCU Building (1925)                  Quincy, IL                             40,042 (2018 est.)
  • 165′            Kanaya (2006)                              Sarasota, FL
  • 165′            Bank Tower (1930)                       Scranton, PA                       77,182 (2018 est.)
  • 165′         E. F. Hutton Tower (1981)  Springfield, OH            59,282 (2018 est.)
  • 164′            Carroll Terrace (?)                        Charleston, WV
  • 163′            Rush Tower (2017)                       Lake Charles, LA
  • 162′            State Farm Downtown (1928)    Bloomington, IL                 77,962 (2018 est.)
  • 162′            Sunset Royale (1989)                    Fort Myers, FL
  • 162′            Huntington Bank (1925)              Saginaw, MI                       48,423, (2018 est.)
  • 162′            Nemours Building (1936)            Wilmington, DE
  • 161′           Barnes Citizens Bldg (1930) Decatur, IL
  • 161′            St. James Building (1913)            Huntington, WV                 46,048 (2018 est.)
  • 161′            State Capitol (1910)                       Pierre, SD                            13,980 (2018 est.)
  • 160′           Huntington Plaza (1986)      Canton, OH
  • 160′           Maley Apartments (1972)             Daytona Beach, FL            68,866 (2018 est.)
  • 160′           Windsor Apartments (1967)         Daytona Beach, FL
  • 160′            Memorial Hospital (?)                  Elyria, OH                           53,881 (2018 est.)
  • 160′           Apartment Towers (1974)             Manhattan, KS                  54,959 (2018 est.)
  • 160′           Wheeling-Pittsburgh Stell (1907) Wheeling, WV                  26,771 (2018 est.)
  • 160′          Delaware Trust (1927)                    Wilmington, DE
  • 159′           Titusville Towers (1970)                Titusville, FL                      46,497 (2018 est.)
  • 158′           Plaza Towers (2005)                      Iowa City, IA
  • 158′           State Office Building (1952)         Jefferson City, MO
  • 158′           Hotel Labella (1968)                      Jefferson City, MO
  • 157′          Verizon Bldg. (1915)                Albany, NY
  • 157′            Sky Tower (?)                                  Ashland, KY                        20,382 (2018 eat.)
  • 157′           WV Manor Apts. (1923)                Bluefield, WV/VA               14,612 (2018 est.)
  • 157′            Boulevard Tower (1941)               Charleston, WV
  • 157′            Chase Bank (1929)                        Mansfield, OH                     46,560 (2018 est.)
  • 157′            Regional Hospital (2013)             Owensboro, KY
  • 157′            County Courthouse (1918)           Sioux City, IA                      82,396 (2018 est.)
  • 156′            Battery Park Apts. (1924)            Asheville, NC
  • 156′           Northbank Center (1922)            Flint, MI
  • 156′           DuPont Building (1908)               Wilmington, DE
  • 155′          Cultural Ed. Center (1978)   Albany, NY
  • 155′            First Merchants Bank (1971)      Anderson, IN                       55,037 (2018 est.)
  • 155′            The Watermark (1971)                 Biloxi, MS
  • 155′            Harrah’s (1995)                              Biloxi, MS
  • 155′            Security Mutual Like (1925)       Binghamton, NY
  • 155′           River Rise (1979)                           Flint, MI 
  • 155′           McLaren Tower (1993)                 Flint, MI 
  • 155′           Richert Manor (1970)                   Flint, MI
  • 155′           County Courthouse (1902)           Marietta, OH                        13,604 (2018 est.)
  • 155′           County Courthouse (1930)          Racine, WI
  • 155′         City Building (1890)               Springfield, OH
  • 155′           Fraser Centre (2017)                     State College, PA                  42,352 (2018 est.)
  • 155′           County Courthouse (1899)          York, PA                                  44,118 (2018 est.)
  • 154′         54 State Street (1973)            Albany, NY
  • 154′          Barresi Heights (?)                         Fall River, MA 
  • 154′           Cottell Heights (?)                         Fall River, MA
  • 154′           Camperdown Apts (2020)           Greenville, SC
  • 154′           Westin Poinsettia (1925)             Greenville, SC
  • 154′           SunTrust Tower (1974)                Pensacola, FL                        52,713 (2018 est.)
  • 154′            Washington Trust (1925)            Washington, PA                   13,508 (2018 est.)
  • 153′            Skyline Tower (2014)                   Champaign, IL
  • 153′            Verizon Building (1923)              Harrisburg, PA
  • 153′            County Annex (1927)                    Meridian, MS
  • 153′            Rutledge Apartments (1972)      Spartanburg, SC
  • 152′          Stratton Med. Center (1951) Albany, NY
  • 152′             Tower Place (1930)                      Anderson, IN
  • 152′            Madison Building (1926)             Reading, PA
  • 150′           State Capitol (1819)                       Concord, NH                        43,412 (2018 est.)
  • 150′           Commerce Building (1949)          Harrisburg, PA
  • 150′           Park at 201 (2014)                         Iowa City, IA
  • 150′           City Hall (1909)                             Montpelier, VT                       7,436 (2018 est.)
  • 150′           Grand Hotel (1984)                       Pensacola, FL
  • 150′           County Courthouse (1897)           Warren, OH                         38,382 (2018 est.)
  • 150′           County Courthouse (1900)          Washington, PA
  • 150′          Community Services (?)                Wilmington, DE

Greenville, SC – Source: upstatesouthcarolinanews.wordpress.com

Below are a couple of resources (one book and one video) on the topic of skyscrapers from Amazon* that you might find interesting.

http://        http://

* A small commission is earned by us from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon.

SOURCES:

Posted in architecture, cities, downtown, economic development, fun, geography, land use, new urbanism, placemaking, planning, skylines, skyscrapers, Statistics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Bu-tte-ful” Town Names


Source: geocaching.com

Below is a list of cities, towns, villages, hamlets, and census-designated places in the United States and Canada that are named for one of my favorite geographic/geologic landforms – the butte  (okay, quit snickering). The photo above aptly shows the difference between a butte and a mesa. Furthermore, a plateau has an even larger elevated surface area than a mesa.

City of Sentinel Butte as seen from atop Sentinel Butte – Source: beautifulbadlandsnd.com

As can be seen, there are a number of towns with butte incorporated into their name from across the western portions of the continent. Personally, my favorite one of these, is Sentinel Butte, because that name largely epitomizes the image of a lone butte standing out in the western wilderness, silently keeping watch over its arid surroundings. In second place, my choice would be Crested Butte, and third would be Picture Butte. My least favorite is Butte alone.

  • Black Butte Ranch, Oregon
  • Butte, Montana, Alaska, Arizona, Nebraska, and North Dakota
  • Butte City, Idaho
  • Butte Falls, Oregon
  • Butteville, Oregon (2) – one is a ghost town, the other is not.
  • Cedar Butte, South Dakota
  • Central Butte, Saskatchewan
  • Crested Butte, Colorado
  • Eagle Butte, South Dakota
  • Elephant Butte, New Mexico
  • Four Buttes, Montana
  • Gold Butte, Nevada (ghost town)
  • Grassy Butte, North Dakota
  • Heart Butte, Montana
  • Mt. Crested Butte, Colorado
  • Mud Butte, South Dakota
  • North Eagle Butte, South Dakota
  • Picture Butte, Alberta
  • Pilot Butte, Saskatchewan
  • Powell Butte, Oregon
  • Red Butte, Wyoming
  • Saddle Butte, Montana
  • Sentinel Butte, North Dakota
  • Square Butte, Montana
  • Study Butte, Texas
  • Two Buttes, Colorado
  • White Butte, South Dakota

Source: zazzle.com

SOURCES:

  • personal knowledge
  • en.wikipedia.org
  • 2019 Rand McNally Road Atlas
Posted in cities, fun, geography, Geology, place names, topography | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Should Struggling Cities Be Renamed?


Source: roadtrafficsigns.com

Everyone loves a good comeback story like is currently happening in Detroit. However,there are some cities that have languished in a depressed economic state for so long (some for 100 years), that their very name can evoke a negative impression. Getting past that negative first impression is very difficult and such an impression can help perpetuate an economic malaise. Here are 20 examples of cities that many would consider to be struggling, with those exceeding 50% population loss being in particularly grave condition and/or prolonged decline:

CITY               PEAK POP. (YEAR)    CURRENT POP EST. (DROP SINCE PEAK)

Aberdeen, WA                 21,723 (1930)                          16,654                        -23.3%

Anniston, AL                   33,320 (1960)                        21,569                          -35.3%

Butte, MT                        41,611 (1920)                           33,901                         -18.5%

Cairo, IL                          15,203 (1920)                           2,281                           -85.0%

Camden, NJ                  124,555 (1950)                          74,532                          -40.2%

Chester, PA                     66,039 (1950)                          34,077                         -48.4%

Cumberland, MD           39,483 (1940)                          19,707                          -50.1%

Danville, IL                      42,570 (1970)                          31,597                          -25.8%

Danville, VA                    53,056 (1990)                         41,130                          -22.5%

East St. Louis, IL            82,366 (1950)                          26,662                         -67.6%

East Cleveland, OH        40,047 (1950)                          17,109                         -57.3%

Flint, MI                          196,940 (1960)                         96,448                        -51.0%

Gadsden, AL                     58,088 (1960)                         35,157                         -39.5%

Gary, IN                           178,320 (1960)                         76,008                         -57.4%

Johnstown, PA                67,327 (1920)                           19,643                         -70.8%

Lima, OH                          53,734 (1970)                           36,862                         -31.4%

Pine Bluff, AR                  57,400 (1970)                           42,984                         -25.1%

Portsmouth, OH              42,560 (1930)                          20,340                         -51.5%

Saginaw, MI                     98,265 (1960)                           48,677                         -50.5%

Youngstown, OH           170,002 (1930)                          64,958                         -61.2%

Much research has been done into the underlying causes for certain cities to struggle, as well as be able to reverse the decline. These include post-industrial economic decline, redlining, racist policies and/or lending practices, political corruption, white-flight, disinvestment, natural disaster, aging populations, aging infrastructure, regional decline, sprawl, and many others. But, to my recollection, no studies have explored whether renaming a city and/or rebranding it would stem the decline or help reverse it. At some point, after 40-50-100 years of decline, new and radical ideas should be seriously considered.

Sure, a name change or rebranding might seem superficial, but change has to start somewhere. One can cite numerous companies, products, schools, teams, venues, and cities that have changed their names. And in the competitive marketplace for ideas, business, and residents, communities should be thought of as a product, as well.

There will likely to be push back over such a notion. Local heritage and community identity are important factors, but desperate times may require a reanalysis of whether such a step would be more beneficial than the status quo.  As can be seen from the suggestions below, there are alternate names that can still capitalize on the heritage the area, or utilize another portion of the community’s identity.

There also may be push back over the potential cost of renaming a city. Obviously, this would not be a cost-neutral step. Everything from signs to patrol cars to letterhead would have to be updated. For struggling cities with tight budgets, such an option may not be affordable, unless grant monies, private donations, or ear-marked economic development funds can be secured for such a change.

 Thoughts on New Names

I’m a strong believer that perception can shape reality. If you call your city a “town,” it will be perceived as being smaller. Allentown, Johnstown, and Youngstown all suffer from this – and only Allentown has been able to maintain its size and status over the years.

In addition, if a city wants to be perceived as important, its name must personify that. Not only does “town” fail in this regard, but any name that is bland, doesn’t sound significant/regional enough, or lacks excitement, will likely have the same problem.

Lastly, the perceptions caused by human-caused environmental disasters, such as the Flint water crisis; the Love Canal contamination in Niagara Falls; the Walkerton, Ontario e-coli outbreak; or contamination in Times Beach, Missouri , can be extremely hard to overcome.   To successfully attract potential newcomers, these places have to first allay the variety of fears that arise from these events.

Using the cities identified above, below are some suggested alternative names to consider:

  • Aberdeen, Washington – Grays Harbor, Washington (harbor on which the city abuts and already the name of the port)
  • Anniston, Alabama – Blue Mountain, Alabama (for the city’s abutting mountain)
  • Butte, Montana – Silver Bow, Montana (while I love buttes as a landform, the word itself, without an accompanying adjective is not very romantic or pretty sounding. Silver Bow is the name of the unified county with Butte.)
  • Cairo, Illinois – Grand Junction, Illinois (for the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers – akin to Grand Junction, Colorado)
  • Camden, New Jersey – Whitman, New Jersey (for Walt Whitman, who lived in Camden)
  • Chester, Pennsylvania – Uppland, Pennsylvania (for the original Swedish settlement that became Chester – and use the double ‘p’ to set it apart.)
  • Cumberland, Maryland – Potomac Bluffs or Allegheny Passage, Maryland (for the region’s topography)
  • Danville, Illinois – Beckwith, Illinois (for the city’s founder, Dan Beckwith. More interesting city name than “Danville” for which there are many)
  • Danville, Virginia – Piedmont, Virginia (for the geography/geology of the region)
  • East St. Louis, Illinois – Eastgate, Illinois (the opposite of the Gateway to the West should be Eastgate, right?)
  • East Cleveland, Ohio – Eastland, Ohio (gives it more self-identity – otherwise East Cleveland should merge with next-door Cleveland)
  • Flint, Michigan – Ojibwa, Michigan (for the Native Americans who lived here and move beyond the just an automotive industry identity)
  • Gadsden, Alabama – Double Springs, Alabama (original city name)
  • Gary, Indiana – Grand Calumet, Indiana or Marquette Dunes, Indiana (either are more interesting and exciting than just “Gary” – one for the river that flows through the city and both suggestions partially capitalize on the new Indiana Dunes National Park designation, while moving Gary beyond a solely steel industry identity)
  • Johnstown, Pennsylvania – Cambria or Cambria City, Pennsylvania (either are more interesting names and are familiar to locals)
  • Lima, Ohio – Shawnee Park, Ohio (for the first residents of the area)
  • Pine Bluff, Arkansas – Grand Bayou or Bartholomew, Arkansas (for the world’s longest bayou that extends to Pine Bluff)
  • Portsmouth, Ohio – Scioto, Ohio (for the Scioto River which passes through the city)
  • Saginaw, Michigan – Chippewa, Michigan (for the Native Americans from the area) or Saginaw Valley to signify a more regional prominence)
  • Youngstown, Ohio – Western Reserve, Ohio (for the portion of the Connecticut Western Reserve that Youngstown once occupied and to move beyond just a steel city industry identity)

SOURCES:

  • personal knowledge
  • en.wikipedia.org pages for each of the cities listed above
  • other links provided within the post
Posted in advertising, branding, business, cities, civics, civility, commerce, Communications, culture, economic development, economic gardening, Economy, futurism, geography, government, history, infrastructure, land use, marketing, place names, placemaking, planning, politics, spatial design, Statistics, sustainability, topography, tourism, Travel, urban planning, Welcome | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amazing Songs from the First Half of 2019


The Raconteurs – Source: metrotimes.com

The first half of 2019 has burst forth with some amazing new music. Especially exciting is the amount and quality of guitar-driven rock. Here’s a list of my favorite tracks so far this year, with links provided to youtube:

Enjoy!

Posted in art, culture, fun, music, music reviews, Radio, Social media, songs, video, writing | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ten+ Planning Lessons from Page, Arizona


Source: lakepowelllife.com

Some might be wondering where the heck Page, Arizona is located and secondly, how could a town founded in 1957 offer up any planning advice. Well, Page sits close to the Arizona-Utah border where the Glen Canyon Dam was constructed to create enormous Lake Powell. The city has a lot of insights to offer for a relatively new town. Having visited Page in 1970 when it was but a mere toddler and again in 2019 now that it’s a fully matured city, I think this blogpost can offer a few interesting insights to planners and others interested in cities generally. In fact, I’m even going to add an extra planning lesson from Page.

Stunning Horseshoe Bend in Page, AZ

  • A government camp that evolved into a dusty, newly planned town, can mature into an inviting and captivating small city, even without a traditional downtown.
  • However, the original car-oriented shopping areas of Page’s downtown are starting to look a tad worn in places and will need to be re-energized with higher densities and other new urbanism strategies.
  • Whoever selected the location of Page blessed both its residents and visitors with some of the most beautiful vistas on the entire planet.
  • The mix of semi-traditional grid pattern atop the plateau and curvilinear streets radiating outward and downward from there successfully takes advantage of the gorgeous terrain and scenic vistas.
  • Even an enormous coal-fired electric generating plant (soon to be decommissioned) and acres of electric lines emanating from the hydroelectric dam cannot detract from the astounding beauty of this location.
  • Not all amazing geology, topography, and archaeology features are immediately apparent the eye – Lower and Upper Antelope Canyons are testaments to this fact.
  • The cluster of 12 houses of worship along South Lake Powell Boulevard and the collection of tiny mid-century motels (originally apartments for dam construction workers) along 8th Avenue are an unexpected treat that helps set Page apart from most other communities.
  • The limited 17 square mile area acquired from the Navajo Nation to establish Page is a welcome deterrent to sprawl and requires the wise use of land.
  • Mass tourism is even a problem here in the high desert of Northern Arizona, as the number of tourists flooding through the two Antelope Canyons and practically spilling over the cliff at Horseshoe Bend was simply jaw-dropping.
  • The diverse mix of cultures found in and around Page – particularly Native American, Hispanic, and Anglo-American – are a refreshing civic feature for such a young city.
  • Hats off to Page for establishing, early on, a 10 mile long non-motorized multi-use trail (The Rim Trail) that encircles the entire city. Well done!

Source: cityofpage.org

 

 

 

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Cities and Towns that Get the Point!


Source: way marking.com

The following city and town names include the word “point.” Sometimes this term refers to a point of land extending into a body of water. Other times it may refer to a craggy hill or prominent point of land. Still, other times the name may refer to a previous hometown, a geographically significant location, or it may just be the name chosen by the first residents. Included in the list are incorporated and unincorporated cities, towns, villages, and hamlets. Townships and counties are not included.

The largest city on the list is Pointe-Noire, Republic of Congo with more than 715,000 residents in 2007; followed by Ponta Grossa, Brzil with more than 311,000 in 2010; Punta Arenas, Chile with a 2012 population of 127,454; and High Point, North Carolina, which has a 2018 population estimate of 112,316 residents.

The most common “point” names for communities appears to be either Cedar, Center, Grosse, High, Pleasant, or West.

While attempts were made to include all places with the term “point” used in their name, any additions, corrections, or suggestions are most welcome. Enjoy!

  • Arrow Point, Missouri
  • Bay Point, California, Florida, and Maine
  • Beach Point, Massachusetts
  • Beesleys Point, New Jersey
  • Big Point, Mississippi
  • Black Point, California
  • Boiling Point, California
  • Breezy Point, Maryland and Minnesota
  • Browns Point, Washington
  • Canal Point, Florida
  • Cape May Point, New Jersey
  • Carneys Point, New Jersey
  • Cedar Point, Kansas, North Carolina, Texas, and Ontario
  • Center Point, Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, and Iowa
  • Central Point, Oregon
  • Chimney Point, Vermont
  • Chipmans Point, Vermont
  • Coles Point, Virginia
  • Crown Point, Indiana and New York
  • Crownpoint, New Mexico
  • Church Point, Louisiana
  • Clear Point, Arkansas
  • Coltons Point, Maryland
  • Common Fence Point, Rhode Island
  • Cove Point, Maryland
  • Dana Point, California
  • Eagle Point, Oregon and Iowa
  • East Point, Georgia and Prince Edward Island
  • Eastpoint, Florida
  • Eastpointe, Michigan
  • East River Point, Nova Scotia
  • Elk Point, South Dakota and Alberta
  • Federal Point, Florida
  • Five Points, California (3) and Delaware
  • Gaskets-Point La Haye, Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Gloucester Point, Virginia
  • Grosse Pointe, Michigan
  • Grosse Point Farms, Michigan
  • Grosse Point Shores, Michigan
  • Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan
  • Hack Point, Maryland
  • Harbor Point, California
  • High Point, North Carolina, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, and Maryland
  • Highpoint, Florida
  • Hunters Point, Arizona
  • Hunts Point, Washington and Nova Scotia
  • Iowa Point, Kansas
  • Kings Point, New York
  • Kittery Point, Maine
  • La Pointe, Wisconsin
  • Larrabees Point Station, Vermont
  • Leeds Point, New Jersey
  • Lighthouse Point, Florida
  • Long Point, Iowa
  • Lords Point, Connecticut
  • Love Point, Maryland
  • Mackworth Point, Maine
  • Middle Point, Ohio
  • Millers Point, Australia
  • Mineral Point, Wisconsin
  • Moss Point, Mississippi
  • Myrtle Point, Oregon
  • New Point, Virginia
  • Oak Point, Texas
  • Pierces Point, New Jersey
  • Pilot Point, Texas
  • Piney Point, Maryland
  • Piney Point Village, Texas
  • Plum Point, Maryland and Virginia
  • Point, Texas
  • Point Arena, California
  • Point au Gaul, Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Point Blank, Texas
  • Point Clear, Alabama
  • Point Comfort, Texas
  • Point Hope, Alaska
  • Point Judith, Rhode Island
  • Point Kettle, Ontario
  • Point Lance, Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Point Lay, Alaska
  • Point Leamington, Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Point Lookout, New York and Maryland
  • Point May, Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Point Mugu, California
  • Point of Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Point of Rocks, Maryland
  • Point O’Rocks, Florida
  • Point Peter, Arkansas
  • Point Place, Ohio
  • Point Pleasant, New Jersey, West Virginia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania
  • Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey
  • Point Roberts, Washington
  • Point Washington, Florida
  • Pointe-a-la-Croix, Quebec
  • Pointe-a-la-Frigate, Quebec
  • Pointe-a-la-Hache, Lousiana
  • Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe
  • Pointe-au-Baril Stati0n, Ontario
  • Pointe-au-Boisvert, Quebec
  • Pointe-aux-Outardes, Quebec
  • Pointe-Claire, Quebec
  • Pointe du Hoc, France
  • Pointe-Fortune, Quebec
  • Pointe-Noire, Republic of Congo
  • Pointe-Sapin, New Brunswick
  • Pointe-Verde, New Brunswick
  • Point Venture, Texas
  • Ponta Delgada, Azores
  • Ponta Grossa, Brazil
  • Ponte de Lima, Portugal
  • Ponto Belo, Brazil
  • Ponto Chic, Brazil
  • Ponto do Ouro, Mozambique
  • Ponto Novo, Brazil
  • Powell Point, Texas
  • Powells Point, North Carolina
  • Powhatan Point, Ohio
  • Punta Ala, Italy
  • Punta Arenas, Chile
  • Punta Cana, Dominican Republic
  • Punta Chame, Panama
  • Punta del Este, Uruguay
  • Punta de Mita, Mexico
  • Punta Gorda, Florida
  • Punta Secca, Italy
  • Rhodes Point, Maryland
  • Rock Point, Maryland
  • Rocky Point, North Carolina
  • Rouses Point, New York
  • Saint Anne Sandy Point, Saint Kitts
  • Sand Point, Alaska
  • Sandpoint, Idaho
  • Sands Point, New York
  • Sandy Point, Texas and Virginia
  • Say brook Point, Connecticut
  • Schicke Point, Texas
  • Sewall’s Point, Florida
  • Shad Point, Maryland
  • Shady Point, Oklahoma
  • Shell Point, Florida
  • Small Point Beach, Maine
  • Sodus Point, New York
  • Somers Point, New Jersey
  • South Point, Texas and Washington
  • South Punta Gorda Heights, Florida
  • Sparrows Point, Maryland
  • Stevens Point, Wisconsin
  • Stewarts Point, California
  • Strawberry Point, Iowa
  • Stumpy Point, NorthCarolina
  • Sunset Point, Florida
  • Swan Point, Maryland
  • Three Points, California
  • Trinity Palmetto Point, St. Kitts
  • Van Buren Point, New York
  • Village Point, Texas
  • West Point, New York, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nebraska, Virginia, and Prince Edward Island
  • Westport Point, Massachusetts
  • Whitefish Point, Michigan
  • White Point Beach, Maryland
  • Whitney Point, New York
  • Wills Point, Texas
  • Wind Point, Wisconsin
  • Wolf Point, Montana
  • Woody Point, Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Yarrow Point, Washington

SOURCES:

Posted in cities, environment, fun, geography, Geology, history, Maps, place names, placemaking, topography, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Ten Planning Lessons from Flagstaff, Arizona


Humphrey’s Peak

Following our recent trip to the beautiful Southwestern United States, here are some thoughts on planning lessons one can learn from impressive and beautiful Flagstaff, Arizona.

  • You can have a physically active and exciting city in a colder-weather, high-altitude environment.
  • Preserving and protecting sensitive archaeological, cultural, environmental, and historical resources can occur amid growth.
  • Three national monuments (Sunset Crater, Walnut Canyon, and Wupatki) in and around your city are excellent role models for environmental sustainability and multi-cultural appreciation.
  • Context sensitive, new urbanist density can successfully augment a community’s admirable aesthetics.
  • Towering snow-capped peaks make for an excellent visual and sensory backdrop.
  • As both Flagstaff and Tucson demonstrate, cities in Arizona can be bicycle, pedestrian, and transit friendly…they can also be dark-sky friendly.
  • Even a city that averages 81 inches of snowfall per year must be vigilant and proactive regarding water conservation.
  • Varying elevation creates unique design opportunities not available where terrain is generally level.
  • Expressways do not have to rip apart the heart of a city while still being functional.
  • As has been noted in prior planning lesson posts, a major university in your city is always a plus – in Flagstaff’s case it is Northern Arizona University.

Wukoki Pueblo in Wupatki National Monument outside of Flagstaff

 

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Tri-Cities and Quad Cities


Tri-Cities of Washington – Source: Interstate-Guide.com

The following are lists of urban regions and metropolitan areas that have developed into a multiple-nuclei of either three (3) or four (4) traditional core communities. By traditional, I mean something other than a suburban edge city (i.e. Tyson’s Corners, VA or Schaumburg, IL.

Tri-Cities of TN/VA – Source: extremecleanpressurewashing.com

Most of the Tri-Cities listed form a triangular urban pattern between the primary cities as depicted above in the map of Johnson city/Kingsport/Bristol. Three (3) that don’t follow this typical spatial pattern are the Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania, the Triple Cities of New York, and Rochester/Dover/Somersworth, New Hampshire. All three of these are linear urban conglomerations along a river valley.

Triple cities of NY – Source: city-data.com

Until recently, I was not aware of any Quad Cities other than the one on either side of the Mississippi in Illinois and Iowa. It turns out the rapidly growing and scenic Prescott area of Arizona also refers to itself as the Quad Cities, as do several other areas.

Ironically, the Prescott area appears to have previously referred to itself as a Tri-Cities, prior to rebranding as a Quad Cities (see the two maps below). Whether this moniker will change to the “Quint Cities” when another town grows larger in the vicinity is unknown. Similarly, the Trestad area of Sweden is also considered a Quad City or Fyrstad when the nearby city of Lysekil is included.

2004 Tri-Cities Business Map – Source: mappers.com

Business map for Prescott-Prescott Valley-Chino Valley (Tri-Cities) of Arizona in 2004.

2019-2020 Quad Cities Business Map – Source: prescottmap.com

Business map for the re-branded Quad Cities of Prescott-Prescott Valley, Chino Valley, and Dewey-Humboldt of Arizona for 2019-2020.

The list below identifies the name of the region/metro area, the core cities, and then the most recent population estimate for the metro area (if applicable or known). Some of the places listed are subsections of larger metropolitan areas.

One last items of note are urban areas that we think of as Tri-Cities that don’t brand, market, promote, or advertise themselves in that way. I’ve always thought of Tampa-St. Pete-Clearwater as a tricity or triopolis. If it was at one time, it doesn’t seem to be any longer. Another example is the San Bernardino-Riverside-Ontario metropolitan area in Southern California (today they are known as parts of the “Inland Empire”). Lastly, the Huntington, WV/Ashland, KY/Ironton, OH area could have or should have been considered a tricity. It would be especially unique as each city forming the triopolis is in a different state.

As always, any additions, corrections, or updates are most welcome, particularly from outside of North America.

Tri-Cities (Tricity or Triopolis)

  • Capital District Tricity, NY – Albany/Schenectady/Troy = 883,000 (2018)
  • Chandigarh Tricity, India – Chandigarh/Panchkula/Mohari = 1,612,000 (2011)
  • Damman Tricity, Saudi Arabia – Damman/Dhrahan/Khobar
  • Dubai Tricity, UAE – Dubai/Ajman/Sharjah
  • Golden Triangle, TX – Beaumont/Port Arthur/Orange = 410,000 (2018)
  • Historic Triangle, VA – Williamsburg/Yorktown/Jamestown
  • Kashubian Tricity, Poland – Wejherowo/Rumia/Reda = 120,000 (2012)
  • Lehigh Valley Tricity, PA/NJ – Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton = 843,000 (2018)
  • Piedmont Triad, NC – Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point = 1,439,000 (2018)
  • Raipur Tricity, India – Raipur/Bhilai/Durg = 3,187,000 (2011)
  • Research Triangle, NC – Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill = 1,938,000 (2018)
  • Trestad, Sweden – Trollhattan/Uddevalla/ Vanersborg = 99,000
  • Tri-Cities, BC – Coquitlam/Port Coquitlam/Port Moody = 234,000 (2016)
  • Tri-Cities, CA(1) – Oceanside/Vista/Carlsbad
  • Tri-Cities, CA(2) – Fremont/Newark/Union City = 233,000 (2016)
  • Tri-Cities, CO – Firestone/Frederick/Dacano
  • Tri-Cities, IL – St. Charles/Geneva/Batavia
  • Tri-Cities, MI(1) – Saginaw/Midland/Bay City = 378,000 (2018)
  • Tri-Cities, M(2) – Grand Haven/Spring Lake/Ferrysburg
  • Tri-Cities, NE – Grand Island/Kearny/Hastings = 173,000 (2018)
  • Tri-Cities, NH – Rochester/Dover/Somersworth
  • Tri-Cities, ON – Kitchener/Cambridge/Waterloo = 524,000 (2016)
  • Tri-Cities, OK – Tuttle/Newcastle/Blanchard
  • Tri-Cities CDP, OR – Myrtle Creek/Canyonville/Riddle
  • Tri-Cities, TN/VA – Johnson City/Kingsport/Bristol (combined VA and TN) = 509,000 (2018)
  • Tri-Cities, VA – Petersburg/Hopewell/Colonial Heights
  • Tri-Cities, WA – Richland/Pasco/Kennewick = 357,000 (2018)
  • Tricity Nepal – Bagging/Beni/Kusma
  • Tricity, Poland – Gdansk/Gdynia/Sopot = 1,098,000 (2017)
  • Triple Cities, NY – Binghamton/Endicott/Johnson City = 240,000 (2018)
  • Warangal Tricity, India – Warangal/Hanamkonda/Kazipet
  • West Yorkshire Tricity, UK – Leeds/Wakefield/Bradford

Quad Cities

  • Quad Cities, AL – Florence/Muscle Shoals/Tuscumbia/Sheffield
  • Quad Cities, AZ – Prescott/Prescott Valley/Chino Valley/Dewey-Humboldt = 232,000 (2018)
  • Quad Cities, IA/IL – Davenport/Moline/Rock Island/Bettendorf = 381,000 (2018)
  • Quad Cities, MN – Eveleth/Virginia/Gilbert/Mountain Iron

Quad Cities of IA/IL – Source: quadcities.com

SOURCES:

Posted in branding, cities, civics, commerce, Communications, economic development, fun, geography, history, land use, Maps, marketing, place names, placemaking, planning, spatial design, sprawl, transportation, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

City/Town Names Based on Indian Band and Tribal Names


The following list of cities, towns, villages, hamlets, and unincorporated communities that were named for Native American Indian tribes and or bands. Several ghost towns are also included. This list also includes translation-corrupted names, Anglicized names, as well as native names for the band or tribe. In a few cases, historians and anthropologists may differ on the etymology of the community’s name. In those cases, if a resource has provided some validation that the place name is derived from a tribe/band’s name, it is included on the list. The list does not include townships, counties, or states/provinces that are named for tribes/bands.

The following states have the most communities names for a Native American Indian tribe or band.

  • Washington = 33
  • Iowa = 26
  • Oregon = 18
  • Illinois = 17
  • California = 16
  • New York and Ohio = 15
  • Missouri and Oklahoma = 14
  • Florida and Indiana = 13
  • Alabama = 12
  • New Mexico = 11
  • Kansas = 9
  • British Columbia = 10
  • Arkansas, North Carolina, and South Carolina = 8

The most commonly used tribal or band name are the following:

  • Miyaimi = 8
  • Pueblo = 8
  • Sioux = 7
  • Osage = 5
  • Seneca = 5

Any additions and/or corrections to this list are most welcome. As wordpress.com’s spell checker prefers to correct terms it doesn’t recognize (despite attempts to prevent it), please forgive any spelling/terminology errors.

City/Town, State – Band/Tribe

  • Abanaka, Ohio – Abenaki
  • Agway, Massachusetts, Montana, and Oklahoma – Agawams
  • Alabama City, Alabama – Alabamee
  • Alabama Landing, Louisiana – Alabamee
  • Alafaya, Florida –
  • Algonquin, Illinois – Algonquin
  • Alesa, Oregon – Alesa
  • Anacostia, DC (part of Washington) – Nacotchtank
  • Apache, Oklahoma – Apache
  • Apache Flats, Missouri – Apache
  • Apache Junction, Arizona – Apache
  • Apalachee, Georgia – Apalachee
  • Apalachicola, Florida – Apalachee
  • Arapahoe, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Wyoming – Arapaho
  • Aztec, New Mexico – Aztec
  • Bannock (ghost town), Montana – Bannock
  • Bella Bella, Washington – Heiltsuk – Thank you, Dan
  • Biloxi, Mississippi – Biloxi
  • Blackfoot, Idaho and Montana – Blackfoot
  • Brule, Nebraska – Brule Lakota (Sioux)
  • Caddo, Oklahoma and Alabama – Caddo
  • Caddoa, Colorado – Caddo
  • Caddo Gap, Arkansas – Caddo
  • Cahokia, Illinois – Cahokia
  • Cahuilla, California – Cahuilla
  • Catawba, North Carolina, Missouri, and South Carolina – Catawba
  • Cathlamet, Washington – Kathlamet
  • Cayuga, Indiana, New York, and Ontario – Cayuga
  • Cayuse, Oregon – Cayuse
  • Chamainus, British Columbia – Chemainus or Stz’uminus – Thank you Dan
  • Chehalis, Washington – Chehalis
  • Chelan, Washington – Chelan
  • Cheraw, South Carolina – Cheraw
  • Cherokee, Alabama, California, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Wisconsin – Cherokee
  • Cherokee Bluffs, Alabama – Cherokee
  • Cherokee Pass, Missouri -Cherokee
  • Cherokee Springs, South Carolina – Cherokee
  • Chewelah, Washington – Chewelah
  • Cheyenne, Wyoming and Oklahoma- Cheyenne
  • Cheyenne Wells, Colorado – Cheyenne
  • Chickasaw, Alabama and Iowa – Chickasaw
  • Chillicothe, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Texas – band of Shawnee
  • Chimacum, Washington – Chimacum
  • Chinook, Washington – Chinook
  • Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin – Ojibwa (Chippewa)
  • Choctaw, Louisiana – Choctaw
  • Clackamah, Oregon – Clackamah
  • Clallam Bay, Washington – Klallam
  • Clatskanie, Oregon – Tlatskanhi
  • Coeur d’Alene, Idaho – Coeur d’Alene
  • Colusa, California – Colusa
  • Comanche, Iowa, Montana, and Oklahoma – Comanche
  • Comox, British Columbia – Comox or K’omoks – Thank you, Dan
  • Conestoga, Pennsylvania – English nickname for the Susquehannock
  • Congaree, South Carolina – Congaree
  • Coquille, Oregon – Thank you, Dan
  • Coosada, Alabama – – Coushatta
  • Coos Bay, Oregon – Coos
  • Coosawhatchze, South Carolina – Cusabo
  • Crow Agency, Montana – Crow
  • Dakota, Illinois and Georgia – Dakota (Sioux)
  • Dakota City, Nebraska and Iowa – Dakota (Sioux)
  • Dakota Ridge, Colorado – Dakota (Sioux)
  • Delaware, Ohio, Arkansas, and Indiana – Lenape (Delaware)
  • East Cathlamet, Washington – Kathlamet
  • East Peoria, Illinois – Peoria sub-tribe of the Illini
  • East Wenatchee, Washington – Wenatchi
  • Edisto, South Carolina – Edistow sub -ribe of Cusabo
  • Edisto Beach, South Carolina – same as above
  • Edisto Island, South Carolina – same as above
  • El Pueblo, New Mexico – Pueblo
  • Eno, North Carolina – Eno
  • Erie, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Indiana, and North Dakota – Erie
  • Eufaula, Alabama and Oklahoma – Eufaula
  • Eutawville, South Carolina – Eutaw
  • Fort Apache, Arizona – Apache
  • Fort Erie, Ontario – Erie
  • Fort Klamath, Oregon – Klamath
  • Guyandotte, West Virginia – part of Huntington – Wyandot
  • Hackensack, New Jersey – Hackensack
  • Hatteras, North Carolina – Hatteras
  • Haw, North Carolina – Sissipahaw
  • Houma, Louisiana – Houma
  • Housat0nic, Massachusetts – Housatonic or Stockbridge
  • Humptulips, Washington – Thank you, Dan
  • Huron, California, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Ohio, and South Dakota – Huron
  • Huzzah, Missouri – french term for the Osage
  • Iowa City, Iowa – Ioway
  • Iowa Falls, Iowa – Ioway
  • Iroquois Falls, Ontario – Iroquois
  • Isleta Pueblo, New Mexico – Pueblo
  • Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico -Pueblo
  • Kalispell, Montana – Kalispel
  • Kanawha, Iowa – Kanawha
  • Kansas, Oklahoma – Kansa or Kaw
  • Kansas City Kansas and Missouri – Kansa or Kaw
  • Kaskaskia, Illinois – Kaskaskia
  • Kickapoo, Illinois – Kickapoo
  • Kiowa, Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma – Kiowa
  • Kitimat, British Columbia – Kitimaat – Thank you, Dan
  • Kittitas, Washington – Thank you, Dan
  • Klamath Falls, Oregon – Klamath
  • Klickitat, Washington – Klikitat
  • Lakonta, Iowa – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Lakota, Iowa – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Lillooet, British Columbia – Lillooet or St’at’ic – Thank you, Dan
  • Lumberton, North Carolina – Lumbee
  • Madawaska, Ontario – Madawaska
  • Mandan, North Dakota – Mandan
  • Maricopa City, Arizona – Maricopa or Piipaash
  • Maroa, Illinois – Maroa
  • Matapeake, Maryland – Matapeake
  • Maumee, Ohio – Miami
  • Mauvilla, Alabama – Mobile
  • Menominee, Illinois and Wisconsin – Menominee
  • Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin – Menominee
  • Mescalero, New Mexico – Apache tribe
  • Miami Florida – Miyaimi
  • Miami, Indiana, Missouri, and Oklahoma – Miami
  • Miami Beach, Florida – Miyaimi
  • Miami Gardens, Florida – Miyaimi
  • Miamisburg, Ohio -Miami
  • Miami Shores, Florida – Miyaimi
  • Miami Springs, Florida – Miyaimi
  • Miamitown, Ohio – Miami
  • Miamiville, Ohio – Miami
  • Mingo, Iowa – Mingo
  • Mingo Junction, Ohio – Mingo
  • Mississauga, Ontario – Mississauga Ojibwa (Chippewa)
  • Mi-Wuk village, California – Miwok
  • Mobile, Alabama – Mobile
  • Modoc, Indiana and Arkansas – Modoc
  • Mohave, California – Mohave
  • Mohawk, New York and Indiana – Mohawk
  • Mohican, Ohio – Mohican
  • Molalla, Oregon – Thank you, Dan
  • Montauk, New York and Missouri – Montaukett
  • Mt. Shasta, California – Shasta
  • Muncie, Indiana and Illinois – Munsee
  • Muncy, Pennsylvania – Munsee
  • Muscatine, Iowa – Mascoutin
  • Muskogee, Oklahoma – Muscogee (Creek)
  • Nacogdoches, Texas – Nacogdoches tribe
  • Nanjemoy, Maryland – Nanjemoy
  • Nanaimo, British Columbia – Snuneymuxw – Thank you, Dan
  • Nanticoke, New York, Ontario, and Pennsylvania – Nanticoke
  • Narragansett, Rhode Island – Narragansett
  • Naselle, Washington -Nisal
  • Nashua, New Hampshire, Iowa, and Montana – Nashaway band of Pennacook
  • Natchez, Mississippi and Alabama – Natchez
  • Natchitoches, Louisiana -Natchitoches
  • Natick, Massachusetts – Natick
  • Navajo, Arizona and New Mexico- Navajo
  • Navajo Mountain, Utah – Navajo
  • Nehalem, Oregon – (another name for the Tillamook) – Thank you, Dan
  • New Miami, Ohio – Miami
  • Nez Perce, Idaho – Nez Perce
  • New Washoe City, Nevada
  • Niantic, Connecticut – sub-tribe of the Narragansett
  • Nooksack, Washington – Thank you, Dan
  • North Kansas City, Missouri
  • North Miami, Florida – Miyaimi
  • North Miami Beach, Florida – Miyaimi
  • North Santee, South Carolina – see Santee
  • North Sioux City, South Dakota – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Ogallala, Nebraska – Oglala Lakota (Sioux)
  • Okanagan Centre, British Columbia – Okanagan or Sylix – Thank you, Dan
  • Okanagan Falls, British Columbia – Okanagan or Sylix – Thank you, Dan
  • Okanogan, Washington – Okanagan or Sylix – Thank you, Dan
  • Old Tappan, New Jersey – Tappan
  • Omaha, Nebraska, Alabama, Georgia, and Missouri – Omaha
  • Oneida, New York, Arkansas, and Iowa – Oneida
  • Oneida Corners, New York – Oneida
  • Onida, North Dakota – Oneida
  • Onondaga, New York and Ontario – Onondaga
  • Opelousas, Louisiana – Appaloosa or Opelousa
  • Osage, Wyoming, Iowa, and Oklahoma – Osage
  • Osage Bend, Missouri – Osage
  • Osage Bluff, Missouri – Osage
  • Osage City, Kansas and Missouri – Osage
  • Osage Mills, Arkansas – Osage
  • Otisco, Indiana – band of Onondaga
  • Oto, Iowa – Otoe
  • Otoe, Nebraska – Otoe
  • Ottawa, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, and Ontario – Odawa (Ottawa)
  • Ottawa Hills, Ohio – Odawa (Ottawa)
  • Ouachita, Arkansas – Ouachita
  • Ouachita City, Louisiana -Ouachita
  • Palouse, Washington – Palouse
  • Pana, Illinois – Pawnee
  • Parsippany, New Jersey –
  • Pascagoula, Mississippi – Pascagoula
  • Pawnee, Texas – Pawnee
  • Pawtucket, Rhode Island – band of the Nipmucks
  • Peoria, Arizona, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, and Oklahoma – Peoria sub-tribe of the Illini
  • Peoria, Heights, Illinois – Peoria sub-tribe of the Illini
  • Pequots, Minnesota – Pequot
  • Pima, Arizona – Pima
  • Piqua, Ohio – Pickawillany (Miami)
  • Piute, California – Paiute
  • Ponca, Nebraska and Arkansas – Ponca
  • Ponca City, Oklahoma – Ponca
  • Port Huron, Michigan – Huron
  • Potawatomie Park, Indiana – Potawatomi
  • Pueblo, Colorado – Pueblo
  • Pueblo Pintado, New Mexico – Pueblo
  • Pueblo West, Colorado -Pueblo
  • Puyallup, Washington – Puyallup
  • Queets, Washington – Quinault
  • Quilcene, Washington – Thank you, Dan
  • Quinault, Washington – Quinault – Thank you, Dan
  • Ramapo, New York – Ramapoo
  • Ree Heights, South Dakota – Arikara (Ree)
  • Roanoke, Virginia, Indiana,, and Missouri – Secotan
  • Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina -Secotan
  • Saanich, British Columbia – Saanich
  • Sac City, Iowa – Sauk
  • Saco, Maine and Missouri – Saco
  • Sammamish, Washington -Thank you, Dan
  • Sandusky, Ohio – Sandusky
  • San Felipe Pueblo, New Mexico – Pueblo
  • San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico -Pueblo
  • Santee, Nebraska – Santee
  • Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico
  • Sauk Rapids, Minnesota – Sauk
  • Sautee Nacoochee, Georgia – Sautee band of Muscogee
  • Savannah, Georgia and Iowa – Shawnee
  • Saxapahaw, North Carolina -Sissipahaw or Haw
  • Seminole, Florida and Oklahoma – Seminole
  • Seneca, Iowa, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Carolina, and South Dakota – Seneca
  • Seneca Castle, New York – Seneca
  • Seneca Gardens, Kentucky
  • Seneca Falls, New York – Seneca
  • Seneca Knolls, New York – Seneca
  • Setauket, New York – Setacott
  • Shasta, California – Shasta
  • Shasta Lake, California – Shasta
  • Shawnee, Kansas, New York, Oklahoma, and Wyoming – Shawnee
  • Shawneetown, Illinois – Shawnee
  • Shinnecock, New York -Shinnecock
  • Snoqualmie, Washington – Snoqualmie
  • Shoshone, Idaho and Nevada – Shoshone
  • Shoshoni, Wyoming – Shoshone
  • Shuswap Falls, British Columbia – Shuswap or Secwe’pemc – Thank you, Dan
  • Siltez, Oregon – Thank you, Dan
  • Sioux Center, Iowa – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Sioux City, Iowa – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Sioux Falls, South Dakota – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Sioux Lookout, Ontario – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Sioux Narrows, Ontario – Lakota (Sioux)
  • Sisseton, South Dakota – Sisseton Dakota (Sioux)
  • Skokomish, Washington – Thank you, Dan
  • Skykomish, Washington -Skykomish
  • Snohomish, Washington – Snohomish
  • Southern Ute, Colorado – Ute
  • South Miami, Florida – Miyaimi
  • South Sioux City, Nebraska – Lakota (Sioux)
  • South Wenatchee, Washington – Wenatchi
  • Spokane, Washington – Spokane
  • Spokane Valley, Washington -Spokane
  • Squamish, British Columbia -Squamish
  • Steilacoom, Washington -Steilacoom
  • Stockbridge, Massachusetts – Stockbridge or Housatonic
  • Suisun City, California – Suisines
  • Susquehanna Depot, Pennsylvania – Suskehannock
  • Takilma, Oregon – Takelma – Thank you, Dan
  • Tamaroa, Illinois – Tamaroa
  • Tangipahoa, Louisiana – Tangipahoa
  • Taos Pueblo, New Mexico – Pueblo
  • Tehachapi, California
  • Temecula, California – Temecula
  • Tenino, Washington – Tenino
  • Tensaw, Alabama – Taensa
  • Tequesta, Florida – Tequesta
  • Teton, Idaho and South Dakota – Teton (Sioux)
  • Teutonic, Idaho – Teton (Sioux)
  • Teton Village, Wyoming – Teton (Sioux)
  • Tillamook, Oregon -Tillamook
  • Tualitin, Oregon – Tualitin
  • Tunica, Louisiana and Mississippi – Tunica
  • Tuolumne, California – band of Me-Wuk
  • Tusayan, Arizona – Tusayan
  • Tuscarora, New York – Tuscarora
  • Tuskegee, Alabama – sub-tribe of the Creek
  • Tuskeego, Iowa – sub-tribe of the Creek
  • Uchee, Alabama – Yuchi, Euchee, or Uchee
  • Umatilla, Oregon
  • Umpqua, Oregon – Thank you, Dan
  • Upper Sandusky, Ohio – Sandusky
  • Ute, Iowa and Nevada – Ute
  • Waccamaw, South Carolina
  • Waco, Texas, Indiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, and North Carolina – Weko band of the Wichita
  • Wahpeton North Dakota and Iowa – band of Dakota (Sioux)
  • Walla Walla, Washington – Walla Walla
  • Wappingers Falls, New York – Wappinger
  • Wash City, Nevada – Washoe
  • Water, South Carolina -Wateree
  • Waupeton, Iowa – band of Dakota (Sioux)
  • Waxhaw, North Carolina and South Carolina
  • Wenatchee, Washington – Wenatchi
  • West Miami, Florida – Miyaimi
  • West Nanticoke, Pennsylvania – Nanticoke
  • West Peoria, Illinois – Peoria sub-tribe of the Illini
  • Whippany, New Jersey – Whippanong
  • Wichita, Kansas and Iowa – Wichita
  • Wichita Falls, Texas – Wichita
  • Willapa, Washington – Thank you, Dan
  • Winnebago, Minnesota – Winnebago
  • Winnebago Heights, Iowa – Winnebago
  • Wyandotte, Michigan, Indiana, and Oklahoma – Wyandot
  • Wyreka, Missouri – same as Yreka
  • Yakima, Washington – Yakima
  • Yamhill, Oregon – Yamhelas
  • Yankton, South Dakota – Yankton
  • Yemassee, South Carolina – Yamassee
  • Yoncalla, Oregon – Thank you, Dan
  • Yreka, California – Yreka
  • Yuma, Arizona and Colorado – Yuma
  • Zuni, Colorado – Zuni
  • Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico – Zuni

For more information on this topic, the following resources are available through Amazon*

    http://

* A small commission is earned by us from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon.

SOURCES:

Posted in Canada, cities, civics, Civil Rights, Communications, culture, diversity, geography, historic preservation, history, humanity, inclusiveness, Native Americans, place names, planning, States, Statistics | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

America’s First Great Town Planners…


Stunning Wukoki Pueblo in Wupatki National Monument near Flagstaff

Gorgeous stonework that blends into the natural sandstone at Wukoki Pueblo

…were not William Penn (Philadelphia), Pierre Charles L’Enfant (Washington, DC), James Oglethorpe (Savannah), nor other post-Columbian examples. No, America’s first great town planners were the Native American Indians. Whether they were the builders of magnificent cliff dwellings and mesa-topped pueblos in the Southwest, or earthen mounds in the Midwest and South, their accomplishments should be an inspiration to any modern planner for a variety of reasons identified below:

Lomaki Pueblo at Wupatki National Monument near Flagstaff

  • Use of local materials for construction.
  • Designs that are properly suited to the geography, geology, topography, and climate of the region.
  • Communal design features that promote and enhance communication, public engagement, and shared purpose.
  • Innovative construction and design methods.
  • Functionality and durability
  • Mix of uses
  • Sustainability and self-sufficiency
  • Creation of a sense of “place”

Having recently visited several pueblo, cliff dwelling, and pit-house communities back in February and last week in Arizona, I was overwhelmed by the feeling that these marvelous communities exemplify what we as planners are constantly striving for, but rarely seem to achieve – the establishment of “place.” Whether it’s the community circles and kivas; the mixed and/or communal nature of the designs; the inspirational, as well as functional and durable architecture; or the breathtaking scenery, these ancient communities are not just historical, archaeological, or cultural artifacts, but are examples of great town planning techniques we need to observe, learn from, and apply to our modern world.

Small Kiva at the Tusayan Ruin in Grand Canyon National Park

Much too often, the formative planning foundations we are/were taught in school tend to focus on Euro-centric paradigms, while, in reality, some of the very best theories and examples of inspired town planning lie right before us, at our very doorstep. All we have to do is walk through the entry and be amazed by what we see and what we can learn.

Elden Pueblo near Flagstaff

This planner hopes that future planning curriculum and training sessions will put greater focus on the pre-Columbian town planning that took place on the North American continent. To truly adapt to and coexist peacefully with our natural environment, we must first learn from it, as well as from those who coexisted with nature for so many years before us. In this time of ongoing climate change, living in a symbiotic relationship with Mother Earth sounds like a win-win proposition!

Impressive Casa Grande National Monument between Tucson and Phoenix

If these magnificent structures and communities interest you as much as they do me, here is a helpful  resource available on Amazon for more information.

http://

* A small commission is earned by us from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon.

 

Posted in archaeology, architecture, art, cities, civics, culture, education, environment, geography, Geology, historic preservation, history, humanity, land use, Native Americans, placemaking, planning, spatial design, topography, tourism, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments