Confronting the pedestrian carnage on American roadways

I recently finished reading Angie Schmitt’s exceptional book entitled; Right of Way: Race, Class and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America. This book is an absolute must read for all planners, engineers, lawmakers, and decision makers.

Source: Amazon.com (A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.)

The details and statistics contained within the book are both shocking and frustrating in the sense that so much of our society seems to have become blasé about the horrific loss of life taking place on our own streets and highways. The heartbreaking personal stories made me wonder if we, as a nation, have lost our collective empathy and sympathy for the misfortunes of others. But, perhaps most maddening is the ridiculous extent of disinterest in addressing even the least expensive and low-hanging fruit solutions by some politicians, lawmakers, and the business community.

Source: statista.com

It wasn’t always this way. As Ms. Schmitt aptly notes, just a little over a decade ago, pedestrian deaths were trending downward (see graph above). But, a variety of factors have lead to renewed increases in pedestrian carnage. The factors are many, but here’s a brief summary of the primary ones:

  • Badly designed streets and roadways
  • Oversizing of pick-up trucks and SUV’s
  • Law enforcement and media that tend to blame the victim
  • Inaccurate, improper, and incorrect enforcement of walking laws
  • Political pushback by the auto and construction industries and their political allies
  • Nominal infrastructure improvements in neighborhoods of color and poor communities
  • Minimal funding for non-motorized (pedestrian and cycling) infrastructure
  • Trends toward an emphasis on protecting the safety of vehicle occupants vs. pedestrians

Among the important data highlighted in her book, Ms. Schmitt’s pinpoints that though approximately 20 percent of all traffic related deaths are pedestrians and cyclists, a paltry 1.5 percent of transportation funding is allocated towards infrastructure serving walkers, bicyclists, and alike. Furthermore, in some cases individual states and Congress have literally robbed this minimal funding and redirected it towards the almighty automobile.

Source: ghsa.org
Source: ghsa.org
Only the 13th child is visible from the driver’s seat in this SUV – Sources: twitter.com/kevpluck/status/1314516115599622145/photo/1 and wthr.com

Another eye-opener were the deadly designs now being built into so many motor vehicles. The height, weight, speed, and dangerous accessories like guard grills for pick-up trucks and SUV’s are appalling. Images within her book and online (see photos above and below) clearly demonstrate the frightening dangers now facing all pedestrians, but particularly children, seniors, and persons with disabilities by oversized and over-muscled motor vehicles. Such vehicles have grown so large and high that the front vision blind zone can extend out as far as 10 feet!

No way the driver would ever see this young child. Source: twitter.com/andyjayhawk/status/1316038292769566723

As the photos below demonstrate, even the front appearances of many large vehicles have become rather sinister and menacing.

So…how do we begin to rectify these problems? Here are a few suggestions derived from both the book and from years as a professional planner:

  • Advocate and insist on effective, low-cost solutions being applied as soon a possible on problem streets and roadways. Often, adding painted markings can make a huge difference.
  • Advocate for increased transportation funding for pedestrian and cycling safety.
  • Advocate for safer designs in motor vehicles that take those outside the vehicle into account.
  • Advocate for road and highway designs that emphasize or improve pedestrian and cyclist safety.
  • Enforce existing laws properly and better educate those applying them.
  • Don’t buy unnecessarily over-sized vehicles.
  • Demand accountability from politicians and decision makers on improving pedestrian and cycling safety.
  • Call out the media and/or law enforcement when they inappropriately blame the victim.
  • Participate in community forums and public hearings to highlight the importance of pedestrian and cycling safety.
  • Support public interest groups, non-profits, and other organizations that are advocating for improved safety.

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A whirling good time to the Mid-America Windmill Museum

Nothing evokes the history of the American Midwest and Great Plains more than the classic windmill spinning effortlessly in the breeze. Sadly, these iconic structures are becoming less and less visible on the American landscape. But, there is a wonderful place to see 52 different varieties of them – the Mid-America Windmill Museum in Kendallville, Indiana.

A visit to this fine museum instantly transports you back to a simpler time and place in our history. It also tells a fascinating story of the development of windmills for use on American farms and ranches while detailing the technical advancements that have taken place. Most surprising to this native Hoosier was that Tri-State Area of Northeast Indiana, Northwest Ohio, and Southern Michigan was a key focal point of windmill development in the United States with dozens of manufacturers located in the region.

One of the most memorable aspects was listening to these historic windmills as they rotated in the breeze. Here are my youtube videos of a single eerie windmill and a windmill duet heard during our visit to the Mid-America Windmill Museum. Enjoy!

Below are a few more of the many images taken during our two-hour visit.

Star Mill made in Kendallville, Indiana

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If you find windmills fascinating too, here is a book resource on windmills, plus an outdoor model windmill for homes and garden that are available on Amazon.com.*

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

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Three stages of becoming an important logistics hub

Source: chainalytics.com

With “just-in-time” supply chains and distribution networks, as well as ever-increasing digital sales, efficient logistics networks have become vitally important to the business community. In that same vein, this modern distribution paradigm has led to the establishment of enormous logistics hubs along and near key truck freight transportation corridors. The following chart identifies the busiest interstate highway truck corridors in the United States.

Source: areadevelopment.com/logisticsInfrastructure/Intermodal-Sites-Q1-2015/site-selection-process-supplychain-optimization-linked-74421.shtml

A review of logistics hubs shows that there are essentially three (3) stages to become an important logistics hub. The following aerial photos of depict each stage from several that exist in and around Indianapolis, Indiana.

EMERGING LOGISTICS HUB – Clayton/Hazelwood, Indiana (I-70 & IN 39)

A newly emerging logistics hub at the next exit west of Plainfield, Indiana (See Maturing Hub)

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GROWING LOGISTICS HUB – Whitestown, Indiana (I-65 & IN 267)

Growing logistics hub in Whitestown, Indiana

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MATURING LOGISTICS HUB – Plainfield, Indiana (I-70 & IN 267/Ronald Reagan Parkway)

Enormous maturing logistics hub just west of Indianapolis International Airport

All three (3) of these logistics hubs have similarities:

  • They are located along one of the nation’s busiest interstate highway truck corridors.
  • They are located outside the periphery of the interstate beltway (I-465).
  • They are located close to the intersection of two (2) or more interstate highways.
  • They have truck and travel services located at them, such as fuel, lodging, and repair services. Even the emerging hub at Clayton/Hazelwood has a Love’s Truck Stop situated there.
  • Signalized intersections are there to allow for safe left turns by large trucks.
  • They have land available for additional distribution centers and warehouses, though land has become limited north of I-70 in Plainfield. This is part of the reason that another hub is developing to the west at Clayton/Hazelwood. In addition, as the advertising aerial image below shows, the Plainfield Logistics Hub is now expanding south if I-70.
Source: plainfieldlogisticspark.com

SOURCES:

Posted in cities, commerce, Communications, consumerism, distribution, economic development, Economy, geography, industry, infrastructure, land use, logistics, Maps, planning, shopping, spatial design, Statistics, Trade, transportation, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My favorite television “dramedies”

Freaks and Geeks (1999-2000)- Source: usmagazine.com

Busy Phillips, James Franco, Linda Cardellini, Jason Segel, Seth Rogen, John Francis Daley, Martin Starr, and Samm Levine.

Throw in occasional and/or guest appearances by Ann Dowd (Aunt Lydia of Handmaid’s Tale), Joanna Garcia (Reba), Rashida Jones (The Office and Parks & Recreation), Shia LaBeouf, Ben Stiller, and Thomas Wilson (Biff of Back to the Future) and you have an outstanding classic in just 18 episodes. Too bad NBC didn’t know what a great show it had.

  1. Freaks and Geeks – such an amazing cast and wonderful show (see photo and list above)
  2. Better Call Saul
  3. Shameless
  4. How I Met Your Mother
  5. Dead to MeLinda Cardellini’s second appearance on this list
  6. The Wild Wild West
  7. The Conners
  8. The Kominsky Method
  9. M*A*S*H
  10. House
  11. The Wonder Years
  12. Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist
  13. Men of a Certain Age
  14. The Greatest American Hero
  15. Chuck

SOURCES:

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The longest bike and/or footbridges in the USA or Canada

Kelowna Water Bridge (2014) near Kelowna, BC – Source: flickr.com

The following working list identifies the longest bicycle and pedestrian bridges in the United States and Canada based on the length (in feet) of their main span. A separate list of bridges that may be long enough to join this list, but for whom the main span length is currently unknown is provided at the end.

Bruce Vento Bridge (2022) – St. Paul, MN – Source: rosalespartners.com

Not included on the list are pedestrian/bicycle bridges that were previously built and/or used for motor vehicles like railway bridges or old highway/street bridges. However, if a new non-motorized structure was constructed on top of the old piers or abutments, those are included.

Columbia River Skywalk (2016) – Trail, BC – Source: tripadvisor.com

As always, any additions, oversights, corrections, or suggestions are most appreciated to keep this list as up-to-date and accurate as possible. For the time being, numerical rankings will not be included until the list is more fully complete. Enjoy!

University District Gateway Bike/Pedestrian Bridge (2018) in Spokane, WA – Source:L designboom.com

Notes:

* Approximate main span length measured by the author using Google Maps

+/- Estimated main span length by another source

Italics – the blogpost author has bicycled or walked over the bridge.

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BRIDGE (YEAR OPENED) – CITY/STATE OR PROVINCE = MAIN SPAN LENGTH

Kelowna Mountain Water Bridge (2014) – Kelowna, British Columbia = 800 foot suspension main span

Columbia River Skywalk (2016) – Trail, British Columbia = 740 foot suspension main span

Russell Fork Gorge Swinging Bridge (proposed) – Breaks Interstate Park, Virginia/Kentucky = 725 foot main span 

Knoxville South Waterfront Bridge (proposed) – Knoxville, Tennessee = 710 foot arched main span

SkyBridge (2019) – Knoxville (Gatlinburg), Tennessee = 680 foot suspension main span

Oakland Estuary Bridge (proposed) – Oakland (Alameda), California = 664 foot main span

Souris Swinging Bridge (2013) – Souris, Manitoba, Canada = 605 foot main span 

Guy West Bridge (1967) – Sacramento, California = 602 foot suspension main span

Ross River Pedestrian Bridge (1944/2018) – Ross River, Yukon = 600 foot suspension main span – originally built for a pipeline

Eagle Canyon Bridge – Dorian, Ontario, Canada = 600 foot main span

Wing Tip Bridge (2013) – Piney View, West Virginia = 584 foot underspan suspension main span

Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge (2008) – Omaha, Nebraska to Council Bluffs, Iowa = 506 foot cable-stayed main span

Dublin Link (2020) – Columbus (Dublin), Ohio = 500 foot cable-stayed main span

Bruce Vento Regional Trail Bridge (2022) – St. Paul, Minnesota = 500 foot cable-stayed main span 

Sundial Bridge (2004) – Redding, California = 494 foot cable-stayed main span

Bright Angel Bridge – Grand Canyon National Park = 490 foot +/- suspension main span

Floyds Fork Park Catenary Pedestrian Bridge (2013) – Louisville, Kentucky = 480 foot suspended main span 

Capilano Suspension Bridge (1903) – Vancouver, British Columbia = 461 foot suspension main span

Pomologen Creek Footbridge (2002) – Fort Montgomery, New York = 461 foot suspension main span

Fort Edmonton Footbridge (2010) – Edmonton, Alberta, Canada = 454 foot suspension main span

Cumberland River Pedestrian Bridge* (2008) – Nashville, Tennessee = 450 foot suspension main span

Kaibab Trail Suspension Bridge (1928) – Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona = 432 foot main span

McKenzie River Bridge (2003) – Eugene, Oregon = 431 foot suspension main span

Golden Skybridge (2021) – Golden, British Columbia = 430 foot main suspension span 

Cloudraker Skybridge (2018) – Vancouver (Whistler), British Columbia = 426 foot suspension main span

Preston Memorial Pedestrian Bridge – River, Kentucky = 420 foot suspension main span 

Amgen Helix Pedestrian Bridge (2004) – Seattle, Washington = 420 foot through-arch main span

Sacramento River Trail Pedestrian Bridge (1990) – Redding, California = 419 foot main span

Scenic Caves Suspension Bridge (2004) – Collingwood, Ontario, Canada = 420 foot main suspension span

Peace Bridge (2012) – Calgary, Alberta, Canada = 415 foot main span

Maroon Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2002) – Aspen, Colorado = 406 foot main steel arch span

Center Street Bridge (2010) – Des Moines, Iowa = 400 foot tied-arch main span – arch separates the foot portion from the bike portion

Kelowna Mountain Earth Bridge – Kelowna, British Columbia = 400 foot main span

Two Cent/Ticonic Footbridge (1904) – Waterville, Maine = 400 foot main suspension span

Rosedale/Star Mine Suspension Bridge (1931) – Drumheller, Alberta, Canada = 385 foot main span

Venderly/St. Joseph River Pedestrian/Bike Bridge (2009) – Fort Wayne, Indiana = 385 foot cable-stayed main span 

Veterans Administration Skybridge (1993) – Portland, Oregon = 378 foot cable-stayed main span 

Blumenauer Bridge (2021) – Portland Oregon = 377 foot through-arch main span

Interstate 4 Pedestrian Bridge (2003) – Orlando (Lake Mary),  Florida = 375 foot cable-stayed main span

Gorge Powerhouse Suspension Bridge (1920s) – Whatcom County, Washington = 370 foot main span

Tawatina Pedestrian Bridge (2021) Edmonton, Alberta = 362 foot main hanging span 

Kapalua Suspension Bridge (2008) – Kapalua, Hawaii = 360 foot main span

Harbor Drive Pedestrian Bridge (2011) – San Diego, California = 355 foot cable-stayed main span

Rene’ Lavoie Footbridge (2013) – Matane, Quebec, Canada = 352 foot main cable-stayed span

Conveyor Footbridge – Denver (Thornton), Colorado = 350 foot +/- suspension main span

Centennial Park Pedestrian Bridge (2024) – Buffalo, New York = 350 foot main span 

Esplanade Riel (2003) – Winnipeg, Manitoba = 349 foot cable-stayed main span

Forest Hill Park Footbridge (1940) – Cleveland, Ohio = 347 foot masonry arch main span 

Denver International Airport Pedestrian Bridge (1993) Denver, Colorado = 345 foot main span

Hangemann Gulch Bridge (2014) – Santa Cruz, California = 340 foot main stress ribbon span 

Gitwinksihlkw Suspension Bridge (1968) – Gitwinksihlkw, British Columbia = 339 foot main span

Peter DeFazio Bridge (2000) – Eugene, Oregon = 339 foot cable-stayed main span

Androscoggin Pedestrian Bridge (1936) – Brunswick, Maine = 332 foot suspension main span

Wards Island Bridge (1951) – New York City, New York = 331 foot verticle lift main span 

Humber Bay Arch Bridge (1994) – Toronto, Ontario = 330 foot double-ribbed arch main span

Lake Hodges Bike/Ped Bridge (2009) – San Diego (Escondido), California = 330 foot stressed-ribbon main span

Passerelle du Canyon des Portes de l’Enfer – Saint-Narcisse-de-Rimouski, Quebec, Canada = 329 foot suspension main span

Griffith’s Pedestrian Bridge (2008) – Vancouver (Burnaby), British Columbia = 328 foot through arch main span

Sky Pilot Suspension Bridge (2014) – Vancouver (Squamish), British Columbia = 328 foot +/- main span

Don Burnett Bicycle-Pedestrian Bridge (2008) – San Jose (Cupertino), California = 325 foot cable-stayed main span

Highland Pedestrian Bridge (2006) – Denver Colorado = 323 foot main span 

SeaTac Skybridge (2020) – Seattle, Washington = 320 foot main span

Keeper of the Plains Bridge (2007) – Wichita, Kansas = 319 foot cable-stayed main span

Piiholo Ranch Suspension Footbridge – Makawao, Hawaii = 317 foot main span

Great Platte River Road Archway Monument (2000) – Kearney, Nebraska = 309 foot main span 

Colorado Center Pedestrian Bridge (2015) – Denver, Colorado = 309 foot steel arch main span 

Peter Courtney Minto Island Bridge (2018) – Salem, Oregon = 309 foot steel arch bridge

Ranney Gorge Suspension Bridge (2004) – Campbellford, Ontario, Canada = 301 foot main span

Blumenauer Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Portland, Oregon = 300 foot main steel arch pan

George C. King Bridge (2014) – Calgary, Alberta, Canada = 296 foot through-arch main span

Granite Falls Suspension Bridge (1935) Granite Falls, Minnesota = 285 foot main span

East Hamilton Waterfront Link Bridge (2009) Hamilton, Ontario, Canada = 280 foot steel arch main span

Berkeley I-80 Bridge (2002) – Oakland (Berkeley), California = 279 foot steel arch main span

Rogue River Pedestrian Bridge (2000) – Grants Pass, Oregon = 279 foot main span 

Bagley Street Pedestrian Bridge (2010) – Detroit Michigan = 277 foot cable-stayed main span

RiNo Pedestrian Bridge – (2017) – Denver, Colorado = 272 foot main suspension span

Iron Horse Trail Overcrossing (2010) – Oakland (Walnut Creek), California = 270 foot main span 

American Tobacco Trail Bridge (2014) – Durham, North Carolina = 270 foot main deck span

Fall Creek Suspension Bridge (1934) – Ithaca, New York = 270 foot main span 

Jordan River Pedestrian Bridge (2017) – Salt Lake City, Utah = 270 foot main span 

Fremont Pass Trail Bridge (2021) – Copper Mountain, Colorado = 270 foot main span 

Cedar River Footbridge (2010) – Charles City, Iowa = 267 foot cable-stayed main span

Toccoa River Swinging Bridge (1977) – Dahlonega, Georgia = 265 foot main span

Pablo Pedestrian Bridge (2011) – Pablo, Montana = 265 foot main span 

Passerelle du parc de la Rivière-aux-Sables (1998) – Saguenay, Quebec, Canada = 263 foot cable-stayed man span

Bow River Footbridge (2013) – Banff, Alberta = 263 foot girder main span

Lake Merritt to Bay Trail Bridge – Oakland, California = 262 foot “S” inclined arch main span with a second 257 foot “S” inclined arch span

Ferry Trail Bridge* (1998) – Twin Cities (Bloomington), Minnesota = 260 foot steel girder main span

Terwillegar Park Bridge (2016) – Edmonton, Alberta, Canada = 260+/- foot stressed-ribbon main span

Salton Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – Vancouver (Abbotsford), British Columbia = 253 foot through arch main span 

Gorge Inn Suspension Bridge (1969) – Newhalem, Washington = 251 foot main span

Waimea Swinging Bridge (1996) – Waimea, Hawaii = 250 foot main span

Tallulah Gorge Footbridge (2002) Dahlonega, Georgia = 250 foot +/- main suspension span

Botanical Center Bridge (2004) – Des Moines, Iowa = 250 foot steel through arch main span

Vineyard Lane Pedestrian Bridge – (2007) – Seattle (Bainbridge Island), Washington = 250 foot main span 

Yankees 153rd Street Bridge* (2008) – New York City, New York = 250 foot main span

Boardman River Bike/Ped Bridge (2009)- Traverse City, Michigan =250 foot main span

35th Street Pedestrian/Bike Bridge (2016) – Chicago, Illinois – 250 foot main cable-stayed spans (two) 

U.S. Olympic Museum Bridge (2021) – Colorado Springs, Colorado = 250 foot main span 

River Drive Pedestrian Bridge – Davenport, Iowa = 250 foot main span

Cady Way Trail Bridge (2006) – Orlando (Winter Park), Florida = 247 foot steel through-arch main span

Crescent Avenue Pedestrian/Bike Bridge (2003) – Fort Wayne, Indiana = 246 foot main span

Tribeca Footbridge (1992) – New York City, New York = 241 foot through truss main span

Baker River Cable Stay Bridge (1998) – Mt. Baker National Forest, Washington = 241 foot cable-stayed main span

Drift Creek Falls Suspension Bridge (1997) – Siuslaw National Forest, Oregon = 241 foot main span

Robert I. Schroder Overcrossing (2010) – Oakland (Walnut Creek), California = 241 foot arched main span 

McLoughlin Boulevard Pedestrian Bridge (2006) – Portland (Milwaukie), Oregon = 241 foot steel arch through truss main span

Curran Suspension Bridge (1939) – Littleton, New Hampshire = 240 foot suspension main span 

Pioneer Pedestrian Bridge – Vancouver (Surrey), British Columbia = 240 foot steel arch main span 

Crazy Creek Waterfalls Suspension Bridge (2004) – Sicamous, British Columbia = 240 foot main span

Blackshale Creek Suspension Bridge – Canmore, Alberta = 240 foot main span

41st Street Pedestrian/Bike Bridge (2018) – Chicago, Illinois = 240 foot main spans (two) 

Creighton Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – Omaha, Nebraska = 240 foot through-arch main spans (two)

Overlake Village Station Bridge (2021) – Seattle (Redmond), Washington = 240 foot main span 

43rd Street Pedestrian/Bike Bridge (2022) – Chicago, Illinois = 240 foot main spans (two) 

Keeseville Suspension Bridge (1888) – Keeseville, New York = 240 foot main span

Little Arkansas River Footbridge – Wichita, Kansas = 240 foot cable-stayed main span

Reiman Bridge (2001) – Milwaukee, Wisconsin = 240 foot cable-stayed main span

Rivanna River Pedestrian Bridge (proposed) – Charlottesville, Virginia = 240 foot cable-stayed main span or two 296 foot through arch main spans  

Seymour River Suspension Bridge – Vancouver (North Vancouver), British Columbia = 239 foot main span 

Adams Street Bike/Ped Bridge (2011) – Grand Rapids (Holland), Michigan = 236 foot main span 

Northgate Bike/Ped Bridge – Seattle, Washington = 234 foot main span 

Ohio River Levee Trail Bridge (2006) – Louisville, Kentucky = 231 foot main span 

North Atwater Crossing (2020) – Los Angeles, California = 231 foot main cable-stayed span

Edna M. Griffin Memorial Bridge (2005) – Des Moines, Iowa = 230 foot steel basket arch main span 

Hubbell Arch Bridge (2005) – Des Moines, Iowa = 230 foot steel basket arch bridge

Rider Way Bridge (2005) – Des Moines, Iowa = 230 foot steel basket arch main span 

Corktown Footbridge (2006) – Ottawa, Ontario, Canada = 230 foot steel arch main span

River Oaks Pedestrian Bridge (2008) – San Jose, California = 230 foot pony truss main span

South Bayfront Ped/Bike Bridge (2010) – Oakland (Emeryville), California = 230 foot arch main span 

MLK Pedestrian Bridge* – Monroe, Michigan = 230 foot main span

Lansing Center Footbridge* – Lansing, Michigan = 230 foot main span

Mile High Swinging Bridge (1952) = Linville, North Carolina = 229 foot main span

Tempe Town Lake Pedestrian Bridge – Phoenix (Tempe), Arizona (2011) = 228 foot through arch main spans (four)

Rogers Bridge (2022) – Atlanta (Duluth), Georgia = 228 foot steel through arch main span

Little Golden Gage Bridge (1960) – Champaign, Illinois = 226 foot suspension main span 

Alcoa Pedestrian Bridge (2010) – Knoxville (Alcoa), Tennessee = 226 foot main span 

University District Gateway Bridge (2018) – Spokane, Washington = 225 foot cables-stayed main spans (two) 

Winooski River Footbridge (2015) – Bolton, Vermont = 224 foot suspension main span

Mad River Pedestrian Bridge (2002) – Dayton, Ohio = 222 foot main span 

Frances Appleton Bridge (2018) – Boston, Massachusetts = 222 foot main span

Hellroaring Suspension Bridge (1935) – Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyoming = 220 foot main span

Hanapepe Swinging Bridge (pre-1992) – Hanapepe, Hawaii = 220 foot main span

Yellowstone River Suspension Footbridge – Gardiner, Montana = 220 foot +/- main span

Martin Olav Sabo Bridge (2002) – Minneapolis, Minnesota = 220 foot cable-stayed main span

San Diego Sure University Pedestrian Bridge (2003) – San Diego, California = 220 foot steel arch truss span

Big Rock Suspension Bridge (2005) – Big Rock, Illinois – 220 foot main span 

Okemos Road Pedestrian Bridge (2015) – Lansing (Okemos), Michigan = 220 foot pony truss main Span

Crisman Crossing (2015) – Newbern, Oregon  = 220 foot Howe timber through truss

35th/36th StreetPedestrian Bridge (2016) – Denver, Colorado = 220 foot main span

Lehi Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Salt Lake City (Lehi), Utah = 220 foot main span 

Tukwila Urban Center Bridge (2028)- Seattle (Tukwila), Washington = 220 foot main span 

Lake San Cristobal Suspension Bridge (2010) – Lake City, Colorado = 220 foot +/- main span

Umtanum Canyon Footbridge – Kittitas County, Washington = 218 foot main suspension span

Granger Road Pedestrian Overpass – Cleveland (Valley View), Ohio = 217 foot suspension main span

Warner Road Pedestrian Overpass – Cleveland (Valley View), Ohio = 217 foot main span

Tidnish Suspension Footbridge – Tidnish, Nova Scotia = 216 foot main span (may be closed?)

I-41/US45 Bike/Ped Bridge (1970) – Milwaukee (Menomonee Falls), Wisconsin= 215 foot main span

Memorial Suspension Bridge (1923) – Winamac, Indiana = 210 foot main span

Sugar River Pedestrian Bridge* – Claremont, New Hampshire = 210 foot main span 

Lullwater Preserve Suspension Footbridge (2008) – Atlanta (Decatur), Georgia = 210 foot +/- main suspension span 

Stearns Road Bike/Ped Bridge* – Chicago (South Elgin), Illinois = 210 foot main spans (two)

Harbor Village Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – St. Joseph-Benton Harbor, Michigan = 210 foot main span

Grand Avenue Park Bridge (2019) – Seattle (Everett), Washington = 210 foot main span

Eau Claire Confluence Crossing Trail – Eau Claire, Wisconsin = 210 – foot tied-arch main span

Dale Earnhardt Memorial Bridge (2002) – Daytona Beach, Florida = 209 foot main span 

Kansas City Zoo Suspension Footbridge (1907) – Kansas City, Missouri = 207 foot main span

Hard Rock Stadium/Florida Turnpike Bridge (2019) – Miami (Miami Gardens), Florida = 207 foot main span 

Colorado Riverway Bridge (2008) – Moab, Utah = 206 foot steel through truss spans (three)

Table Mesa Pedestrian Bridge (2014) – Denver (Boulder), Colorado = 205 foot main span 

Duck Run Suspension Bridge (1922) – Glenville, West Virginia = 204 foot main span – abandoned

Marine Research Lab Suspension Bridge (2017) – Biloxi (Ocean Springs), Mississippi = 202 foot main span

Milford Swing Bridge (1889) – Nashua (Milford), New Hampshire = 200 foot suspension main span 

Turkey Run State Park Suspension Bridge (1916) – Marshall, Indiana = 200 foot main span 

US 90 Pedestrian Overpass (2002) – Jacksonville, Florida = 200 foot main span pony truss

Hudson River Way* (2002) – Albany, New York = 200 foot main span

Bitterroot River Suspension Footbridge (2004) – Conner, Montana = 200 foot main span

Yukon Suspension Bridge (2006) – Whitehorse, Yukon (tho in BC) = 200 foot main span

Consumnes River Pedestrian Bridge (2007) – Rancho Murieta, California = 200 foot Warren through truss main span

Flanders Crossing (2021) – Portland, Oregon = 200 foot steel truss main span

Skydance Bridge (2012) – Oklahoma City, Oklahoma = 200 foot pony truss main span

Virgil Gilman Trail IL 56 Bridge (2006) – Chicago (Aurora), Illinois = 200 foot main pony truss span

East Boise River Footbridge – Boise, Idaho (2001) = 200 foot steel through arch main span

Saranac River Pedestrian Bridge – Plattsburgh, New York = 200 foot main suspension span

Alcoa Greenway Bridge (2010) – Knoxville (Alcoa), Tennessee = 200 foot pony truss main span

Sweetwater Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2012) – Lithia Springs, Georgia = 200 foot main span 

Washington Avenue Pedestrian Bridge (2014) – Denver (Golden), Colorado = 200 foot steel arch main span

Great Seneca Pedestrian Bridge – Washington, DC (Gaithersburg, MD) = 200 foot main pony truss span

Nickel Plate Trail Bridge (2018) – Kokomo, Indiana = 200 foot pony truss main span 

D & L Trail Bridge (2019) – Lehigh Valley (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania  = 200 foot through truss main span 

Pendleton Pedestrian Bridge (2020) – Indianapolis (Pendleton), Indiana = 200 foot main span

Cedar Avenue Pedestrian Bridge (2022) – Twin Cities (Apple Valley), Minnesota = 200 foot main bow truss span 

Taylor Yard Pedestrian Bridge (2022) – Los Angeles, California = 200 foot main spans (two)

Sherbrooke Pedestrian Bridge (1997) – Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada = 197 foot steel truss main span 

Saline Creek Drive Pedestrian Bridge – Fort MacMurray , Alberta = 197 foot arch main span 

Elk Falls Suspension Bridge (2015) – Campbell River, British Columbia = 197 foot main span

Black River Harbor Suspension Bridge (1939) – Ironwood (Ottawa National Forest), Michigan = 193 foot main span

Marsh Road Pedestrian Bridge – Lansing (Haslett), Michigan = 193 foot street truss main span

Tishomingo Swinging Bridge (1939) – Tishmingo State Park, Mississippi = 190 foot +/- main span

Kishwoot Island Park Footbridge – Whitehorse, Yukon = 190 foot +/- suspension main span

Ochsner Hospital Pedestrian Bridge(2012) – New Orleans (Metarie), Louisiana = 190 foot main span  

South Reserve Pedestrian Bridge (2017) – Missoula, Montana = 190 foot steel arch main span

Milne Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – Toronto (Markham), Ontario = 190 foot main suspension span 

UCSD Mesa Housing Bridge (2020)- San Diego, California = 190 foot main span 

Lincoln Park Passerelle (1940) – Chicago, Illinois = 187 foot through-arch main span

Rhine-Lafayette Pedestrian Overpass  (2015) – Portland, Oregon = 184 foot steel through-truss main span

International Speedway Blvd. Bridge (2015) – Daytona Beach, Florida = 182 foot main span 

Rock City Swing Along Bridge – Atlanta (Lookout Mountain), Georgia = 180 foot main span

Tridge (1981) – Midland, Michigan = 180 foot wood through-arch spans (three)

Old Plank Road Trail Bridge (1999) – Chicago (Frankfort), Illinois = 180 foot cable-stayed main span 

Warm Springs “Red” Footbridge* (2000) – Boise, Idaho = 180 foot through-arch main span

Baylor Stadium Footbridge* – Waco, Texas = 180 foot main span 

West Pedestrian Bridge (2015) – Boise (Garden City), Idaho = 180 foot steel truss main span

Barbara Walker Wildwood Trail Crossing (2019) – Portland, Oregon = 180 foot main span 

Lincoln Village Pedestrian Bridge (2020) – Chicago, Illinois = 180 foot main span 

King-Liberty Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Toronto, Ontario = 180 foot main span 

Water Street Trail Bridge* – Detroit (Ypsilanti), Michigan = 180 foot main span

Luce Line Trail Bridge (2005) – Hutchinson, Minnesota = 178 foot main spans (two) 

Big M Pedestrian Bridge/Dinkytown Bridge (1949/1995) – Minneapolis, Minnesota = 176 foot suspension main span 

Monon Trail/IN 32 Pedestrian Bridge (2020) – Indianapolis (Westfield), Indiana = 176 foot pony truss main span

Jefferson Avenue Footbridge (1902) – Springfield, Missouri = 175 foot steel through-truss main spans (3) – temporarily closed

Gold Strike Park Pedestrian Bridge (2001) – Denver (Arvada), Colorado = 175 foot cable-stayed main span

Caguitas River Suspension Footbridge (2007) – Caguas, Puerto Rico – !75 foot main span

Confluence Trail Pedestrian Bridge (2020) – Atlanta, Georgia = 175 foot pony truss main span 

Chauga Heights Footbridge – Chauga Heights, South Carolina = 175 foot suspension main span

Arroyo Grande Swinging Bridge (1995) – Arroyo Grande, California = 171 foot main span

Wanakena Footbridge (1902) – Wanakena, New York = 171 foot main span 

Liberty Bridge (2004) – Greenville, South Carolina = 171 foot cable-stayed main span

Delta Ponds Pedestrian Bridge (2010) – Eugene, Oregon = 171 foot cable-stayed main span

Fort York Pedestrian Bridge – North (2017) – Toronto, Ontario, Canada = 171 foot steel arch main span

Foster Park/Lovelock Pedestrian Bridge* (ca 1920) – Fort Wayne, Indiana = 170 foot suspension main span

Wallace Caldwell Memorial Bridge (1940) – Chicago (Riverside), Illinois = 170 foot main suspension span

George S. Eccles 2002 Legacy Bridge (2001) – Salt Lake City, Utah = 170 foot cable-stayed main span

AOL Headquarters Bridge (2001) – Washington, DC (Dulles, VA) = 170 foot main span

Keystone Trail/Little Papillion Bridge* – Omaha, Nebraska = 170 foot main span  

Rhythm City Skybridge (2005) – Davenport, Iowa = 170 foot cable-stayed main span

Union Gateway Bridge (2010) – Denver, Colorado = 170 foot main pony truss span

Great AlleghenyTrail Bridge (2010) – Pittsburgh (Duquesne), Pennsylvania = 170 foot main span 

Wolf Trap Pedestrian Bridge (2012) – Washington, DC (Vienna, VA)= 170 foot main span 

Lincoln Avenue Pedestrian Bridge (2019) – Denver (Lone Tree), Colorado = 170 foot main span 

Infosys Pedestrian Bridge (2020) – Indianapolis, Indiana = 170 foot main truss span

Stillwater River Suspension Footbridge (2021) – Dayton (Covington), Ohio = 170 foot main span

Coliseum Boulevard/Parker Cole Crossing (2020) – Fort Wayne, Indiana = 168 foot cable-stayed main span

Little Mac Footbridge (1996) – Manistee, Michigan = 167 foot suspension main span

Grand River Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – Kitchener (Cambridge), Ontario = 167 foot main spans (two) 

Tropicana/MGM North Bridge (?) – Las Vegas, Nevada = 166 foot main span

Sultan River Bike/Ped Bridge (2019) – Sultan, Washington = 166 foot main span 

Hampton Avenue Pedestrian Bridge (2020) – Greenville, South Carolina = 165 foot main span 

Cascade Park Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Cleveland (Elyria), Ohio – 166 foot main span 

Utah Valley University Bridge (2021) – Provo (Orem), Utah = 165 foot main spans (two)

Adobe Creek/US 101 Bridge (2021) – Palo Alto, California = 165 foot pony truss main span

Buntzen Lake Suspension Bridge = Lake Butzen, British Columbia = 164 foot main span

La Manche Suspension Bridge (2000) – La Manche, Newfoundland = 164 foot main span

Phyllis J. Tilley Memorial Bridge (2012) – Fort Worth, Texas = 163 foot stressed concrete ribbon arch main span

André Blouin Footbridge (2014) – Amqui, Quebec = 163 foot main span

Roselle Road Pedestrian Bridge (2019) – Chicago (Schaumburg), Illinois = 163 foot main spans (three)

US 27 Pedestrian Bridge (1972) – Pine Knot, Kentucky = 160 foot aluminum arch main span

Beaverton Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Portland (Beaverton), Oregon = 160 foot main spans (two) 

Bud Hendrickson Bridge* (2015) – LaCrosse, Wisconsin = 160 foot main span  

Yellow Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2016) – Akron (Copley), Ohio = 160 foot main span

Riverwalk Cultural Trail Pedestrian Bridge – Elkhart, Indiana = 160 foot main span 

Oconto River Pedestrian Bridge – Oconto County, Wisconsin = 160 foot main span

Broadmeadows Bridge* – Columbus, Ohio = 160 foot wooden through-arch main span 

Poudre River Pedestrian Bridge* – Fort Collins, Colorado = 160 foot main span

Katy Trail/Mockingbird Ped Bridge* (2014) – Dallas, Texas = 160 foot main spans (two) 

Irene Hixon Whitney Bridge (1988) – Minneapolis, Minnesota = 159 foot through truss main span

US 90 Pedestrian Bridge – Biloxi, Mississippi = 158 foot through truss main span 

Prairie Street Bike/Pedestrian Bridge (2015) – Elkhart, Indiana = 158 foot pony truss main span 

Ash Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Bridgeport/Fairfield, Connecticut = 158 foot main span 

North Bank Bridge (2012) – Boston (Cambridge), Massachusetts = 157 foot main span

Colman Dock Pedestrian Bridge (2019) – Seattle, Washington = 157 foot main span 

Airport Parkway Ped/Bike Bridge* – Ottawa, Ontario = 157 foot main span 

Wright State Way (2015) – Dayton (Beavercreek), Ohio = 156 foot main spans (three) 

Grand Avenue Pedestrian Bridge (2017) – Glenwood Springs, Colorado = 156 foot main spans (three) 

Point Bonita Lighthouse Footbridge (1950s) – Point Bonita, California = 155 foot main suspension span

Wolfensberger Pedestrian Bridge (2016) – Denver (Castle Rock), Colorado = 155 foot main span

Oldsmar Adventure Park – Tampa Bay (Oldsmar), florida = 154 foot +/- main span

Washington & Old Dominion Trail Bridge (2021) – Washington, DC (Arlington, VA) = 153 foot long main span

Hard Rock Stadium/Marino Blvd (2019) – Miami (Miami Gardens), Florida = 152 foot main span 

Kicking Horse Bridge (2001) – Golden, British Columbia, Canada = 151 foot timber main span

Cocoplum Bridge (2013) – Miami (Coral Gables), Florida = 151 foot main span 

Willow Metropark Trail Bridge* – Detroit (New Boston), Michigan = 151 foot main span

Wind River Suspension Bridge (1930s) – Carson, Washington = 150 foot main span

Cow Pasture River Bridge (1992) – George Washington National Forest, Virginia = 150 foot suspension main span

Kimberling Creek Suspension Bridge (1992) – Jefferson National Forest, Virginia = 150 foot main span

Greenbrier Suspension Bridge (1994) – Monongahela National Forest, West Virginia = 150 foot main span

Cassidy Suspension Bridge (1997) – Sierra National Forest, California = 150 foot main span

BP Pedestrian Bridge (2004) – Chicago, Illinois = 150 foot main span

Sioux Falls Bike Trail Bridge (2005) – Sioux Falls, South Dakota = 150 foot main span 

Lancaster Country Club Bridge (2007) – Lancaster, Pennsylvania = 150 foot main span 

CAP Trail Bridge (2012) – Phoenix, Arizona = 150 foot main spans (four) 

I-35E Ped Bridge at UNT* – Dallas-Ft. Worth (Denton), Texas = 150 foot main span 

Ravine Garden Suspension Bridge (2012) – Seattle (Bellevue), Washington = 150 foot main span 

Cole Pedestrian Bridge* (2014) – Logansport, Indiana = 150 foot main span

Universal City Station Bridge (2016) – Los Angeles, California = 150 foot main span

Smolen-Gulf Covered Pedestrian Bridge (2016) – Ashtabula, Ohio = 150 foot main span 

Kalahari Resort Pedestrian Bridge (2017) – Sandusky, Ohio = 150 foot main span 

King of Trails Bridge (2018) – Iola, Kansas = 150 foot main span 

Hwy. 401 Pedestrian Bridge (2020) – Toronto (Mississauga), Ontario = 150 foot main span 

Bryn Mawr Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Chicago (Rosemont), Illinois = 150 foot main spans (two) 

Erie-Lackawanna Trail/Columbia Ave. Bridge* – Chicago (Hammond, IN) = 150 foot main span

Pedestrian Bridge – Colorado Springs, Colorado = 150 foot main span

Kapaa Suspension Bridge – Kapaa, Hawaii = 150 foot main span

Blanchard River Pedestrian Bridge* – Findlay, Ohio = 150 foot main span

Findlay Country Club Bridge #1* – Findlay, Ohio =150 foot main span

Findlay Country Club Bridge #2* – Findlay, Ohio =150 foot main span

Ottawa River Pedestrian Bridge* – Lima, Ohio = 150 foot mains span

Waterway Village Pedestrian Bridge (2026) – Mobile (Gulf Shores), Alabama = 150+ foot arched main span

Kensington Metropark Trail Bridge* – Detroit (South Lyon), Michigan = 150 foot main span

I-215 Beltway Truss Bridge (2014) – Las Vegas, Nevada = 148 foot main truss

Erie-Lackawanna Trail/Little Calumet Bridge* – Chicago (Highland, IN) = 148 foot main span 

Milne Dam Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – Toronto (Markham), Ontario = 148 foot cabled stayed main span 

Tobacco Trail Bridge (2004) – Greensboro, North Carolina = 147 foot main span  

9th Street Pedestrian Bridge (2006) – Wilmington, Delaware = 147 foot main span 

Bjarne Ness Memorial Footbridge (1971) – Fort Ransom, North Dakota = 145 foot +/- main suspension span

47th Street Pedestrian/Bike Bridge (2007) – Chicago, Illinois = 145 foot main steel arch span

S.F. Bay Trail Bridge (2009) – San Francisco (South S.F. ), California = 145 foot main span

Kingsway Pedestrian Bridge (2009) – Vancouver (Burnaby), British Columbia = 145 foot through arch main span 

Passerelle des Basques (1999) – Trois-Pistoles, Quebec, Canada = 144 foot suspension main span

McHenry Riverwalk Bridge (2006) – Chicago (McHenry), Illinois = 144 foot main span 

Central Marin Ferry Connection Pathway Bridge (2015) – San Francisco (Larkspur), California = 144 foot main span

Saulteaux Pedestrian Bridge (2017) – Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan = 144 foot main suspension span

Pine Slough Wetlands Bridge (2004) – Boise (Eagle), Idaho = 143 foot main span 

Fort York Pedestrian Bridge-South (2017) – Toronto, Ontario, Canada = 141 foot arch main span

Blue Heron Bridge (2005) – Boston (Newton), Massachusetts = 141 foot steel tied-arch main span

Regional Transportation District Footbridge (2010) – Denver (Broomfield), Colorado = 141 foot main span

Mississinewa River Ped/Bike Bridge – Marion (Gas City), Indiana = 140 foot main span 

Rattlesnake Bridge* (2002) – Tucson, Arizona = 140 foot main spans (two)

College Avenue Pedestrian Bridge (2004) – Columbia, Missouri = 140 foot main span 

Freight House Pedestrian Bridge (2006) – Kansas City, Missouri = 140 foot main span

T. Evans Wyckoff Memorial Bridge (2008) – Seattle, Washington = 140 foot main span

Moody Pedestrian Bridge (2016) – Austin, Texas = 140 foot cable-stayed main spans (two)

Moores Creek Bridge (2020) – Charlottesville, Virginia = 140 foot main span 

Park @ Bothell Landing Bridge (2021) – Seattle (Bothell), Washington = 140 foot pony truss main span

Ygnacio Valley Road Overcrossing* – Oakland (Walnut Creek), California = 140 foot through arch main span

Faurot Park Pedestrian Bridge* – Lima, Ohio = 140 foot main span

Sunset Transit Center Bridge* – Portland, Oregon = 140 foot main span

Croswell Swinging Bridge (1905) Croswell, Michigan = 139 foot main span 

Silver Comet Trail Bridge (2003) – Atlanta (Powder Springs), Georgia = 139 foot main span 

Wilderness Park Footbridge (2015) – Lincoln Nebraska = 139 foot main span

Harborlands Pedestrian Bridge* (2018) – Toronto (Oshawa), Ontario = 138 foot main span

Johnson Street Pedestrian Bridge – San Antonio, Texas = 138 foot main span

Metropark Trail Bridge* – Detroit (New Boston), Michigan = 138 foot main span

Lion’s Park/Hangingstone River Pedestrian Bridge (2011) – Fort MacMurray, Alberta = 138 foot cedar main span 

Danville Swinging Bridge – Indianapolis (Danville), Indiana = 137 foot +/- main suspension span

White City Canal Trail Bridge (201?) – Salt Lake City, Utah – 136 foot main span 

Moffat Cancer Center Bridge (2004) – Tampa, Florida = 135 foot main span 

GO Pedestrian Bridge* (2012) – Toronto (Pickering), Ontario = 135 foot main span

Riverview Bridge (2015) – Seattle (Renton), Washington = 135 foot main span

Top Crossing Bridge (2007)- Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada = 134 foot main span (two)

Loop 101 Pedestrian Bridge – Phoenix (Glendale), Arizona (2011) = 134 foot cable-stayed mains spans (two) 

Thoreau Footbridge (2015) – Waterbury (Washington), Connecticut = 134 foot suspension main span

Erie Canalway Trail Bridge (2019) – Buffalo (Amherst), New York = 134 foot main span 

I-10 Pedestrian Bridge (1949) – San Antonio, Texas = 131 foot main steel arch span

McKee Road Pedestrian Bridge – Madison, Wisconsin = 131 foot pony truss main span

Birchwood Pedestrian Bridge (proposed) – Fort MacMurray, Alberta = 131 foot main span 

Midtown Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – Airdrie, Alberta = 131 foot main span

Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge (1912) – Vancouver (North Vancouver), British Columbia, Canada = 130 foot main span

27th Avenue Bridge (1941) – New York City (Brooklyn), New York = 130 foot main steel arch span

Frohnmayer Bridge* – Eugene, Oregon = 130 foot main spans (three)

Greenway Pedestrian/Bike Bridge* – Eugene, Oregon = 130 foot main spans (three) 

Owosso Bike Bridge* – Eugene, Oregon = 130 foot main span(s)

Denver Millennium Bridge (2002) – Denver, Colorado = 130 foot cable-stayed main span

Bridge of Glass (2002) – Tacoma, Washington = 130 foot main span

Oakhurst Linear Park Bridge (2004) – Chicago (Aurora), Illinois = 130 foot main span 

Cincinnati Zoo Bridge (2008) – Cincinnati, Ohio = 130 foot main span 

US 23 Pedestrian/Bike Bridge* – Detroit (Ann Arbor), Michigan =130 foot main spans (two)

IUSB Bike Trail Bridge* – South Bend, Indiana = 130 foot main spans (four)

Pennyrile Rails-to-Trails (2013) – Clarksville, TN (Hopkinsville, KY) = 130 foot main span 

Ansonia Pedestrian Bridge (2018) – New Haven (Ansonia), Connecticut = 130 foot main span 

Bushkill Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2019) – Lehigh Valley (Easton), Pennsylvania = 130 foot main span 

Northwest Expressway Pedestrian Bridge (2022) – Oklahoma City, Oklahoma = 130 foot main span 

Water Street Trail Bridge South* – Detroit (Ypsilanti), Michigan = 130 foot main span

Ford Lake Trail Bridge* – Detroit (Ypsilanti), Michigan = 130 foot main span

Barnard Magnet School Bridge (2006) – New Haven, Connecticut = 129 foot main span 

McIntire Park Pedestrian Bridge – Charlottesville, Virginia = 127 foot main span

Tower District Pedestrian Bridge (2010) – Columbus, Ohio = 126 foot main span

Slattum-Hewett Suspension Footbridge (1974) – Fort Ransom, NorthDakota = 125 foot +/- main span

Knickerbocker Bicycle Bridge* (1980) – Eugene, Oregon = 125 foot main span

The Link (1988) – Kansas City, Missouri = 125 foot main span

Dry Creek Pedestrian Bridge (2001) – Denver (Englewood), Colorado = 125 for main span

Stanford Golf Course Bridge (2005) – San Francisco (Palo Alto), California = 125 foot main span 

Trailnet Multi-Use Pedestrian Bridge (2017) – Athabasca, Alberta = 125 foot main span

Marvin Adams Waterway Bridge (2017) – Miami (Key Largo), Florida = 125 foot main span

Metrorail Pedestrian Overpass (2017) – Miami (Coral Gables), Florida = 125 foot main span 

Brady Street Bridge – Milwaukee, Wisconsin = 125 foot main span

Gateway Bridge (proposed) – Tulsa, Oklahoma = 125 foot main spans (twelve)

Memorial Bridge (1923) in Winamac, IN – photo by author

Other possible bridges:

  • Mohawk Valley Gateway Overlook (2016) – Amsterdam, NY
  • Gibbs Street Pedestrian Bridge – Portland
  • Dodger Point Bridge – Olympic National Park, Washington
  • Coalbanks Crossing Bridge (2003) – Lethbridge, AB
  • Forrest & Maxie Preston Memorial Suspension Bridge (1999)
  • Fraser River pipeline/ped bridge – 200m
  • Patapsco State Park Suspension Bridge – Baltimore, MD
  • Gayle B. Price, Jr. Bridge – Dayton, OH
  • James River Suspension Bridge – Buchanan, VA
  • Kootenai Falls Swinging Bridge – Troy, Montana
  • Mason Park Bridge – Houston, TX 
  • Milwaukee River Skybridge
  • Montmorency Falls Suspension Bridge
  • Nichols Bridgeway (2009) – Chicago
  • Phoenix Gateway Bridge – Hartford, CT
  • Prince’s Island Bridge – Calgary, AB
  • Ravine Bridge – New Brunswick, NJ
  • Rector Street Bridge – NYC, NY
  • Riverside Drive Skyway Bridge I and II – NYC, NY
  • Myles Canyon Suspension Bridge – Yukon, Canada
  • Rockefeller University Footbridge – NYC, NY
  • Ryan Island Suspension Bridge – Great Falls, MT
  • Scripps Crossing Ped Bridge – San Diego = 140′ ?main span
  • Spokane Falls Bridge I and II
  • Stone Mountain Cable Stayed Bridge (1983)
  • TVA Appalachian Footbridge, TN 
  • Zarautz Elevator – San Sebastian, Spain
  • Enterprise Canal Trail Bridge – Clovis, CA (2025)
  • Agassiz Bridge Fertile, MN (2005)
  • Northaven Trail Bridge (2023) Dallas, TX
  • Teague Ped Bridge – Bossier City, LA (2016)
  • Baldwin Hills Ped Bridge – LA = 440′ total
  • University Drive Ped Bridge – Rolla (2021)
  • Two Rivers Park Bridge – Little Rock 
  • Republic Ped Bridge, MO = 150 foot main span status?
  • Gray Station Bridge – Des Moines
  • Hantcher Bridge – Iowa City
  • Parkside Ped Bridge – DC
  • Marcy Holmes Ped Bridge/5th Street SE – Twin Cities 
  • Texas Women’s University Ped Bridge 
  • U of Minn Suspension Bridge – Twin Cities
  • Columbia Hts. Ped Bridge <170′ main span 
  • Saratoga Bridge – Marshall, MN
  • Red River Pedestrian Bridge – Clarksville, TN = 290′ (span?) 
  • University Drive Pedestrian Bridge – Huntsville, AL
  • Gulf State Park Pedestrian Bridges (two), AL
  • Brockport Loop Bridge, NY
  • W. Tennessee St. Ped Bridge – Tallahassee, FL
  • Coast Guard Museum Ped Bridge – New London, CT
  • Black Diamond Trail Bridge – Ithaca, NY proposed = 195′ or 225′ main span 
  • Empire State Trail Bridge over CSX – Syracuse, NY
  • North Coast Harbor Pedestrian Bridge (2021) – Cleveland, OH
  • Great Miami River Ped Bridge (2023) – Piqua, OH
  • WPA/Salt Creek/Cross Mound Park Suspension Bridge (1936) – Tarlton, OH
  • Doral Ped Bridge, FL
  • Osborne Ped/Bike Bridge (proposed) – Winnipeg, Manitoba 
  • The Spirit Trail Bridge (2014) – Vancouver (North Vancouver), British Columbia
  • Western Ontario University Ped Bridges (two)
  • Burnaby Lake Pedestrian Bridge (proposed)
  • Hauser Suspension Footbridge (1991) – Washington, CT
  • Brandywine Creek Footbridge, DE (1909)
  • Kiroli Park Suspension Footbridge – West Monroe, LA
  • Grand Ravines Suspension Bridge (2017) – Grand Rapids (Jenison), Michigan = 275′ total length
  • Indiana Beach Suspension Bridge – Monticello, Indiana
  • Cambridge City Swinging Bridge, Indiana
  • Whitewater Park Bridge (2019) – Fort Collins, Colorado

SOURCES:

Posted in Active transportation, Alternative transportation, archaeology, architecture, art, bicycling, Biking, bridges, Canada, cities, entertainment, fitness, fun, geography, health, hiking, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, pictures, placemaking, planning, recreation, rivers/watersheds, States, Statistics, topography, tourism, trails, transportation, Travel, walking | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

1933 Chicago World’s Fair “Century of Progress” homes

While visiting Indiana Dunes National Park this week, we saw the five homes that had been included in the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair “Century of Progress” exhibit. Following the conclusion of the fair, they were moved by barge or truck to Beverly Shores, Indiana. Today, these five (5) impressive homes form the “Century of Progress Historic District.”

Due to the elevation change, I could not get a quality photograph of the Cypress Log Cabin and the House of Tomorrow is in need of renovation. As a result, online photos are provided of these two. Regardless, I believe you will find these stunning homes and their history to be fascinating. Enjoy!

Cypress Log Cabin – Source: tripadvisor.com

If these homes and the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair are of interest to you, below are short links to several books on the topic which are available through Amazon.com.* Click on the short link at the bottom of the image to access the specific webpage.

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Posted in architecture, art, cities, consumerism, futurism, historic preservation, history, Housing, land use, landscape architecture, pictures, placemaking, product design, spatial design | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fort Wayne’s three iconic bicycle/pedestrian bridges

Completed over the past dozen years, three stunning bicycle/pedestrian bridges now link the Purdue University-Fort Wayne campus trail network to the City of Fort Wayne’s Rivergreenway System.

Parker Cole/Coliseum Boulevard Crossing – opened in 2020

It’s hard to describe how impressive these three structures are, but the architectural design literally takes your breath away. As is visible from the photos, all of them incorporate some element of cable-stayed support into their design. The main span lengths are indeed impressive for pedestrian/bicycle bridges, ranging from 168 feet for the Parker Cole/Coliseum Boulevard Crossing, to 246 feet for the Crescent Avenue Bridge, to a whopping 385 feet for the Venderly/St. Joseph River Bridge. There is even a tunnel thrown in beneath Broyles Boulevard, west of the Crescent Avenue Bridge

Venderly/St. Joseph River Bridge – opened in 2009

As an avid cyclist and hiker, it is heartwarming to see increased infrastructure spending being allocated towards non-motorized transportation options. Furthermore, as an alumni of Purdue, it’s wonderful to see the Fort Wayne campus and the City of Fort Wayne partner in taking proactive and exciting steps to provide safe and varied transportation options to residents, students, staff, and visitors alike. Bravo to all involved!

Venderly/St. Joseph River Bridge
Crescent Avenue Bridge

Posted in Active transportation, architecture, art, bicycling, Biking, cities, economic development, education, fitness, fun, health, hiking, infrastructure, land use, landscape architecture, Maps, pictures, placemaking, planning, product design, recreation, rivers/watersheds, spatial design, tourism, trails, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Seaport suburbs of major inland cities

Port Klang, Malaysia – Source: lloydslist.maritimeintellience.informa.com

Some of the largest cities in the world are located a relatively short distance inland. As a result, their primary seaport developed at a coastal suburb instead. Secondarily, several of these cities once had harbors, but due to their shallow depth, they were required to relocate their modern port facilities further out (closer to the sea). Growing ship sizes and the cost to maintain (dredge) old shipping channels became more challenging. Both Bremen and Glasgow provide examples of moving the harbor closer to the sea.

Source: zxc.wiki

This alphabetical list identifies those cities with seaport suburbs. In the case of Los Angeles, the Port of Long Beach is located adjacent to the Port of Los Angeles. Both are important international shipping seaports, even though the heart of Los Angeles, including downtown, is located inland. A similar example is Houston and Texas City, Texas.

Port of Piraeus, Greece – Source: ekathimerini.com
CORE CITY
Athens, Greece
Bremen, Germany
Caracas, Venezuela
Conakry, Guinea
Glasgow, Scotland
Kuala Lumpur, MY
Lima, Peru
Los Angeles, USA
Merida, Mexico
Pyongyang, NK
Rome, Italy
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Seoul, SK
Surat, India
Tirana, Albania
Tunis, Tunisia
SEAPORT
Piraeus
Bremerhaven
La Guaira
Kaloum
Greenock
Port Klang
Callao
Long Beach
Progresso
Nampo
Civitavecchia
Santos
Incheon
Hazira
Durrës
La Goulette
RANKINGS*
30th container port
27th container port
Busiest port in VE
22nd port in Africa
Popular for cruises
12th container port
4th busiest in SA
20th container port
78th cruise port
Busiest port in NK
9th cruise port
30th container port
4th busiest in SK
Growing port
Albania’s top port
56th cruise port
* World rankings unless noted

SA – South America

Piraeus – also 10th ranked cruise port in Europe and 24th cruise port in world

Crowded Civitavecchia cruise port – Source cruisin.me

SOURCES:

Posted in Africa, Asia, business, cities, economic development, Europe, geography, globalization, history, India, industry, infrastructure, land use, Latin America, logistics, Maps, Mexico, North America, planning, rail, rivers/watersheds, shipping, South America, spatial design, Statistics, tourism, Trade, transportation, Travel, UK, Uncategorized, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Urbanized coastal lagoons in the age of climate change

A coastal lagoon is defined and described as:

“A body of water separated from larger bodies of water by a natural barrier. Coastal lagoons form along gently sloping coasts. They are generally shallower than atoll lagoons and tend to be separated from the ocean by an island, reef, or sand bank. Most of the time, coastal lagoons are connected to the ocean by an inlet.”

Source: https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/lagoon.html
Source: researchgate.net

Given their shallow nature, coastal lagoons face a number of potential threats from climate change. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Increased water temperatures
  • Sea-level rise
  • Storm surge
  • Increased precipitation which can lead to erosion, pollution runoff, submergence of lagoon barriers, flooding, and potential drying of the surrounding wetlands.

In addition, the natural barriers that separate coastal lagoons from larger water bodies may limit the normal flushing of the waters within the lagoon, therefore increasing pollution from runoff within the lagoon’s catchment area. This could also lead to eutrophication from increased nutrient load in the lagoon.

Algae bloom in Indian River Lagoon – Source: ocenabites.org

For those coastal lagoons with large cities situated on them, other factors at play include land use and transportation development pressures, dredging for shipping channels, wakes created by shipping and boating activities, and for a surprising number of these twelve lagoons, threats from nearby fossil fuel drilling, refining, and related activities.

Source: travelweekly.com

Below are satellite images of some of the most urbanized lagoons in the world. Bear in mind that other terms tend to be used for lagoons in various parts of the world, including “bay,” “lake,” or “river.” Large metropolitan areas located on coastal lagoons include:

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Ciudad de Carmen – Source: patiabierta.mx

Given the size of these metropolitan areas and the greater propensity for stormwater runoff and urban pollution, the coastal lagoons associated with these cities will be even more susceptible to the impacts from climate change listed previously in this post.

The twelve (12) lagoon images provided include:

Ébrié Lagoon in the Ivory Coast

Source: maps.google.com

——-

Indian River Lagoon in Florida

Source: maps.google.com

——-

Jamaica Bay Lagoon in New York

Source: maps.google.com

——–

Lagos Lagoon in Nigeria

Source: maps.google.com

——-

Laguna de Terminos in Mexico

Source: maps.google.com

——–

Lago de Maracaibo in Venezuela

Source: maps.google.com

——–

Lagos dos Patos in Brazil

Source: maps.google.com

——-

Lake Nokoue Lagoon in Benin

Source: mapsa.google.com

——-

Lake Borgne Lagoon in Louisiana

Source: maps.google.com

——–

Szczecin Lagoon on the border of Poland and Germany

Source: maps.google.com

——–

Venetian Lagoon in Italy

Source: maps.google.com

——-

Vistula Lagoon on the border of Russia and Poland

Source: maps.google.com

SOURCES:

Posted in Africa, agriculture, cities, climate change, culture, economic development, ecosystems, energy, environment, Europe, geography, Geology, historic preservation, history, industry, infrastructure, land use, Latin America, Maps, Mexico, nature, North America, pictures, planning, politics, pollution, rivers/watersheds, Russia, shipping, South America, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, sustainability, topography, tourism, Trade, traffic, transportation, Travel, urban planning, Wildlife | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s largest “cape” cities and towns

Cape Town and the Cape of Good Hope – Source: twitter.com

The following list identifies those cities and towns with the geographic term “cape” in their name. Twenty (20) different nations are represented on this diverse list. As always, any additions, corrections, or suggestions are welcome.

  1. Cape Town, South Africa = 4,005,016 (2016 est. )
  2. Cabo Frio (Cold Cape), Brazil = 230,278 (2020)
  3. Cabo San Lucas, Mexico = 202,694 (2020)
  4. Cape Coral, Florida, USA = 194,495 (2019 est.)
  5. Cape Coast, Ghana = 169,894 (2010)
  6. Ras Tanura (Cape Oven), Saudi Arabia = 153,933 (2018)
  7. San José del Cabo, Mexico = 136,285 (2020)
  8. Ras Al-Khaimah, UAE = 115,949 (2014)
  9. Cape Girardeau, Missouri, USA = 40,559 (2019 est.) – only inland city on the list
  10. Arraial do Cabo, Brazil = 30,593 (2020)
  11. Ra’s Lanuf, Libya = 13,300 (2010)
  12. Capo d’Orlando, Sicily, Italy = 13,256 (2018)
  13. Cap Skirring, Senegal = 12,000 (2009)
  14. Cabo Ledo, Angola = 11,709 (2014)
  15. Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA = 10,470 (2019 est.)
  16. Cape Elizabeth, Maine, USA = 9,080 (2012 est.)
  17. Lège-Cap-Ferret, France = 8,374 (2018)
  18. Myskhako, Russia = 7,984 (2010)
  19. Cape May Courthouse, New Jersey, USA = 5,338 (2010)
  20. Gagliano del Capo, Italy = 5,154 (2017)
  21. Cap Malheureux, Mauritius = 5,070 (2011)
  22. San Vito Lo Capo, Sicily, Italy = 4,690 (2017)
  23. Cap-d’Ail, France = 4,529 (2018)
  24. Portopalo di Capo Passero, Sicily, Italy = 3,916 (2017)
  25. Cape May, New Jersey, USA = 3,422 (2019 est.)
  26. North Cape May, New Jersey, USA = 3,226 (2010)
  27. Cape Vincent, New York, USA = 2,812 (2016 est.)
  28. Karaburun, Turkey = 2,722 (2014)
  29. Westkapelle, Netherlands = 2,594 (2019)
  30. Cap-Pelé, New Brunswick, Canada = 2,425 (2016)
  31. Baie du Cap (Bay Cape), Mauritius = 2,388 (2015)
  32. Ras al-Helal (Crescent Cape), Libya = 2,235 (2006)
  33. Roseto Capo Spulico, Italy = 1,914 (2011)
  34. Cape Woolamai, Victoria, Australia = 1,676 (2016)
  35. Cabo de Gata (Cat Cape), Spain = 1,583 (2014)
  36. Cittadella del Capo (Cape Citadel), Italy = 1,123 (2011)
  37. Cape Charles, Virginia, USA = 1,019 (2019 est.)
  38. West Cape May, New Jersey, USA = 1,001 (2019 est.)
  39. Ras Madrakah, Oman = 915 (2020)
  40. Cape Paterson, Victoria, Australia = 891 (2016)

Capelelene, Mozambique = ?

Ras Al-Khair, Saudi Arabia = ?

Cape Coral and Fort Myers – Source: terraprints.com

SOURCES:

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