Where mass transit matters – metros/subways

Source: britannica.com

The following is a list of the 100 busiest metro/subway systems in the world. Given that certain members of the United States Congress think mass transit is unimportant to fund, these systems are perfect counterpoints to their collective and individual naivete’. The list does not include commuter railroads or bus systems. Those systems shown in bold I have personally ridden on at one time or another.

  1. Tokyo Subway 3.161 billion (2010)
  2. Moscow Metro 2.348 billion (2010)
  3. Seoul Subway 2.173 billion (2009-2010)
  4. Shanghai Metro 1.884 billion (2010)
  5. Beijing Subway 1.84 billion (2010)
  6. Guangzhou Metro 1.64 billion (2011)
  7. New York City Subway 1.604 billion (2010)
  8. Paris Métro 1.506 billion (2010)
  9. Mexico City Metro 1.410 billion (2010)
  10. Hong Kong Mass Transit Railway 1.366 billion (2011)
  11. London Underground 1.107 billion (2010)
  12. Osaka Municipal Subway 837 million (FY 2010)
  13. Cairo Metro 805 million (2009/2010)
  14. Saint Petersburg Metro 777.3 million (2010)
  15. São Paulo Metro 754 million (2010)
  16. Singapore Mass Rapid Transit 744.8 million (2010)
  17. Madrid Metro 642 million (2009)
  18. Santiago Metro 621 million (2010)
  19. Prague Metro 578.5 million (2010)
  20. Taipei Metro 566.4 million (2011)
  21. Vienna U-Bahn 534.4 million (2010)
  22. Kiev Metro 519 million (2011)
  23. Berlin U-Bahn 508.9 million (2009)
  24. Delhi Metro 459.5 million (2010-2011)
  25. Caracas Metro 484.6 million (2009)
  26. Tehran Metro 437.3 million (2010)
  27. Nagoya Municipal Subway 427.5 million (2008)
  28. Buenos Aires Subway 409.8 million (2008)
  29. Athens Metro 388 million (2009)
  30. Barcelona Metro 381.2 million (2010)
  31. Munich U-Bahn 360 million (2010)
  32. Toronto subway and RT 336 million (2010)
  33. Rome Metro 331 million (2008)
  34. Milan Metro 328 million (2007)
  35. Stockholm Metro 310 million (2010)
  36. Budapest Metro 297 million (2008)
  37. Montreal Metro 296.3 million (2010)
  38. Kharkiv Metro 278 million (2007)
  39. Busan Subway 274.8 million (2010)
  40. Minsk Metro 273.6 million (2010)
  41. Lyon Metro 250 million (2008)[
  42. Bucharest Metro 219 million (2007)
  43. Washington Metro 217.2 million (2010)
  44. Nanjing Metro 214 million (2010)
  45. Sapporo Municipal Subway 210 million (2006)
  46. Baku Metro 206.1 million (2009)
  47. Chicago ‘L’ 203 million (2009)
  48. Manila Light Rail Transit System 196.6 million (2008)
  49. Hamburg U-Bahn 194.9 million (2009)
  50. Lisbon Metro 177 million (2009)
  51. Kolkata Metro 173 million (2009)
  52. Yokohama Municipal Subway 164 million (2007)
  53. Medellín Metro 155 million (2008)
  54. Rio de Janeiro Metro 154.0 million (2009)
  55. Boston Subway 145 million (2007)
  56. Warsaw Metro 140.2 million (2010)
  57. Chongqing Rail Transit (CRT) 140 million (2009)
  58. Shenzhen Metro 138 million (2009)
  59. Brussels Metro 136 million (2006)
  60. Bangkok Skytrain 136 million (FY 2009)
  61. Kyoto Municipal Subway 125.5 million (2008)
  62. Nuremberg U-Bahn 122.5 million (2009)
  63. Kobe Municipal Subway 121 million (2008)
  64. SkyTrain (Vancouver) 117.4 million (2010)
  65. Ankara Metro 113.2 million (2007)
  66. Frankfurt U-Bahn 112.1 million (2008)
  67. Daegu Metro 110 million (2008)
  68. RapidKL Light Rail Transit, Kuala Lumpur 109.2 million (2008)
  69. Fukuoka City Subway 108 million (2004)
  70. Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART), San Francisco 101.7 million (2007)
  71. Lille Metro 95.8 million (2009)
  72. SEPTA, Philadelphia 92.4 million (2009)
  73. Tbilisi Metro 91.8 million (2007)
  74. Amsterdam Metro 91 million (2002)
  75. Copenhagen S-train 91 million (2008)
  76. Monterrey Metro 88.3 million (2008)[
  77. Rotterdam Metro 87.1 million (2008)
  78. Bilbao Metro 87.0 million (2009)
  79. Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) 79.1 million (2009)
  80. Wuhan Metro 73 million (2011)
  81. Santo Domingo Metro 73 million (2009)[
  82. Incheon Subway 73 million (2008)
  83. Oslo Metro 73.0 million (2008)
  84. Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH), New York City 72.4 million (2008)
  85. Tashkent Metro 71 million (2007)
  86. Novosibirsk Metro 70 million (2007)
  87. Marseille Metro 69 million (2007)
  88. Valencia Metro 68 million (2009)
  89. Sofia Metro 65 million (2009)
  90. Docklands Light Railway 64 million (2008)
  91. Bangkok Metro 63.7 million (2009)
  92. Recife Metro 59.9 million (2009)
  93. Sendai Subway 58 million (2008)
  94. Helsinki Metro 58 million (2008)
  95. Istanbul Metro 55.6 million (2006)
  96. Brasília Metro 54.8 million (2009)[
  97. Copenhagen Metro 54,3 million (2011)
  98. Kaohsiung MRT 49.6 million (2011)
  99. Tyne and Wear Metro 47 million (2008)[
  100. Yekaterinburg Metro 46 million (2007)

SOURCE: en.wikipedia.org

Of the top 100 metro/subway systems, they are dispersed around the globe in the following manner:

  • Africa: 1
  • Asia: 36
  • Europe: 41
  • North America: 14
  • Oceania: 0
  • South America: 8

Here’s the perfect song for reading about and riding on metros; “Metro” by the band Berlin:

This entry was posted in Asia, cities, density, Europe, land use, rail, spatial design, transit, transportation, urban planning and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Where mass transit matters – metros/subways

  1. kwan says:

    My Hong Kong friends and I are surprised that the city is ranked lower than the other Chinese cities. When I shared this with my former professor who works in Hong Kong’s Transport Dept. This is what he said, “Figures from Chinese authorities are very often “unreliable”. I don’t think the patronage of the HK system would be lower than those of Shanghai or, GZ, Beijing in 2010. BTW, London should have a spot in the high ranking there.”

    Like

  2. Wow, those cities in the billions are unfathomable. Tokyo could transport half the world’s population once a year. Shameful that the US doesn’t even make it on list until #7.

    BTW here’s another good metro riding song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRnXzOxelF8

    Like

  3. Pingback: Where mass transit matters (pt. 2) – busiest North American commuter railroads | Panethos

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