Diploma versus dunce cap states


The 2010 data below shows the ten states with the highest percentage of residents who have a bachelor degree or higher, followed by the ten states who have lowest percentage of residents with at least a bachelor’s degree. With the exception of Colorado, all of the states with the best percentages are located in the Northeast, while eight of the 10 states with the lowest percentage are situated in the South.

Source: AARP Bulletin, June 2012.

Top 10 diploma states

  1. District of Columbia – 50.1
  2. Massachusetts – 39.0
  3. Colorado – 36.5
  4. Maryland – 36.1
  5. Connecticut – 35.5
  6. New Jersey – 35.4
  7. Virginia – 34.2
  8. Vermont – 33.6
  9. New Hampshire – 32.8
  10. New York – 32.5

Top 10 dunce cap states

  1. West Virginia – 17.5
  2. Arkansas – 19.5
  3. Mississippi – 19.5
  4. Kentucky – 20.5
  5. Louisiana – 21.4
  6. Nevada – 21.7
  7. Alabama – 21.9
  8. Indiana – 22.7
  9. Oklahoma – 22.9
  10. Tennessee – 23.1
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3 Responses to Diploma versus dunce cap states

  1. smartin108 says:

    “Dunce” is a rather pejorative label, don’t you think? And this did not come from the article you cited, as far as I can tell. So why “dunce”? After all, in a ranked list of 51 players, 10 somebodys have to be in the bottom 10. One could argue from that same source 75% of Michiganders are dunces. That means, sadly, there is only a 6% chance neither of us is a dunce. How are you leaning?

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    • Rick Brown says:

      Yes, I tend to agree with you. It was meant to clearly distinguish between the state rankings. Personally I am apalled at Michigan’s score and think we have to do better.

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      • smartin108 says:

        Granted, we could all do better. In fact, I argue there is little or no clear distinction between states. 80% of states fall between 20% and 34% diploma rates; a narrow band defines the majority.

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