Canada’s busiest airports in 2011


Source: faa.gov

Source: faa.gov

Below are final 2011 statistics listing the busiest airports in Canada. The first identifies the top 25 airports based on passengers, while the second lists the top 15 airports in the country in terms of cargo tonnage. It is interesting to note that two of the top 25 airports for passenger traffic are seaplane bases – in Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia. It is also interesting to note that Hamilton International Airport is a significant air freight hub in Canada despite not being in the top 25 for passengers.

12/13/12 update: According to data from Toronto and wikipedia – City Airport had 1.55 million passengers in 2011.

Vancouver - Source: en.wikipedia.org

Vancouver – Source: en.wikipedia.org

Total Passengers (see update note above)
  1. Toronto, ON (Pearson) – 32.28 million
  2. Vancouver, BC – 16.39 million
  3. Montreal, QC (Trudeau) – 13.23 million
  4. Calgary, AB – 12.07 million
  5. Edmonton, AB – 6.16 million
  6. Ottawa, ON (Cartier) – 4.36 million
  7. Halifax, NS (Stanfeld) – 3.48 million
  8. Winnipeg, MB (Richardson) – 3.38 million
  9. Victoria, BC – 1.46 million
  10. Kelowna, BC – 1.36 million
  11. Quebec City, QC – 1.34 million
  12. St. John’s, NF – 1.33 million
  13. Saskatoon, SK (Diefenbaker) – 1.21 million
  14. Regina, SK – 1.11 million
  15. Fort McMurray, AB – 0.71 million
  16. Thunder Bay, ON – 0.69 million
  17. Moncton, NB – 0.56 million
  18. London, ON – 0.46 million
  19. Prince George, BC – 0.39 million
  20. Yellowknife, NT – 0.33 million
  21. Comox, BC – 0.31 million
  22. Vancouver, BC (Harbour-Seaplane)– 0.30 million
  23. Charlottetown, PE – 0.28 million
  24. Deer Lake, NF  – 0.28  million
  25. Victoria (Harbour-Seaplane)– 0.25 million
Total Air Freight/Cargo
  1. Toronto, ON (Pearson) – 339.1 million tonnes
  2. Vancouver – 186.4 million tonnes
  3. Calgary. AB – 85.5 million tonnes
  4. Hamilton, ON – 85.1 million tonnes
  5. Montreal, QC (Trudeau) – 76.6 million tonnes
  6. Montreal, QC (Mirabel) – 66.9 million tonnes
  7. Winnipeg, MB (Robertson) 65.3 million tonnes
  8. Halifax (Stanfeld) – 25.5 million tonnes
  9. Moncton, NB – 23.6 million tonnes
  10. Edmonton. AB – 23.0 million tonnes
  11. Ottawa, ON (Cartier) 10.3 million tonnes
  12. St. John’s NF – 8.9 million tonnes
  13. Saskatoon, SK – 4.8 million tonnes
  14. Victoria, BC – 4.5 million tonnes
  15. Kelowna, BC – 2.8 million tonnes
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13 Responses to Canada’s busiest airports in 2011

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  13. prkralex says:

    London Heathrow Airport, which witnessed a whopping 48.2 million passengers from January to August 2013, continues to be the busiest airports in the UK, with Gatwick a distant second and Newcastle Airport just beating Liverpool John Lennon Airport to tenth place. You shall know the updated ones

    Like

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