Two new dark-sky place designations


Source: darksky.org

Death Valley – Source: darksky.org

The International Dark-Sky Association has announced the designation of two more International Dark-Sky places this week.  The two new sites are:

Congratulations to both new designees and to the International Dark-Sky Association for promoting the protection of the night environment worldwide.  The previous designees in these categories are the following:

Parks

NAME

LOCATION

YEAR

TIER

Natural Bridges National Monument

Utah, USA

2006

Gold

Cherry Springs State Park

Pennsylvania, USA

2008

Gold

Galloway Forest Park

Scotland, UK

2009

Gold

Zselic National Landscape Protection Area

Hungary

2009

Silver

Goldendale Observatory Park

Washington, USA

2010

Silver

Clayton Lake State Park

New Mexico, USA

2010

Gold

Hortobagy National Park

Hungary

2011

Silver

Observatory Park

Ohio, USA

2011

Silver

The Headlands

Michigan, USA

2011

Silver

Big Bend National Park

Texas, USA

2012

Gold

Death Valley National Park

California, USA

2013

Gold

Source: International Dark-Sky Association

Reserves

Name

Location

YEAR

Tier

Mont Mégantic Quebec, Canada 2008 Silver
Exmoor National Park Devon and Somerset Counties, England, UK 2011 Silver
Aoraki Mackenzie New Zealand 2012 Gold
NamibRand Nature Reserve Namibia 2012 Gold
Brecon Beacons National Park Wales, UK 2013 Silver

 Source: International Dark-Sky Association

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5 Responses to Two new dark-sky place designations

  1. basil berchekas jr says:

    FYI: When I was mobilized through the US Army and sent to Afghanistan in 2009, I learned that outside Kabul and Kandahar our outlying bases (I was at Camp Salerno in Khost..pronounced “host”..Province, about 15 miles east of the Pakistani border) maintained a policy known as “light discipline”. In other words, no lights whatsoever were visible outside buildings or tents. Therefore walking at night you could see virtually all the stars and constellations visible on a clear night. That aspect was beautiful! Since our installations were located in valleys and Afghanistan is a mountainous country, light discipline was necessary to mitigate and mortar or rocket attacks from higher elevations, so as to complicate targeting by insurgents. At any rate, it was beautiful just about any cloudless night there.

    Like

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