Frontier trailhead towns of the Old West


Source: xphomestation.com

Source: xphomestation.com

During the great migration of emigrating pioneers across the America’s western frontier, certain towns became the primary staging and supply points for settlers, wagon trains, stagecoaches, cattle drives, and communications. These trailhead towns were key to the development of the nation between the Mississippi River on the east and the Pacific Ocean on the west.

Pony Express Station in Gothenburg, Nebraska

Pony Express Station in Gothenburg, Nebraska – January 2014

Some trailhead towns grew into mighty metropolitan areas (i.e. St. Louis and Sacramento – both notably are also navigable river cities), others became secondary suburbs of newly arising cities (i.e. Independence and Leavenworth as suburbs of Kansas City and Council Bluffs as a suburb of Omaha), while other have tended to fade from their mid-19th century glory days (Atchison, Nauvoo, Fort Laramie, and Abilene).

Source: oregontrailcenter.org

Independence Landing -Source: oregontrailcenter.org

Below is a list of the primary frontier trailhead towns of America’s Old West during the mid-19th century (with weblinks provided for most):

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Source: en.wikipedia.org

If I missed any key trails or trailhead towns associated with America’s westward expansion, please let me know and I will gladly add them. I purposely did not include the Lewis and Clark Trail as it was a trail of exploration and not an emigration or communications route.

Source: legendsofamerica.com

Source: legendsofamerica.com

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Active transportation, cities, commerce, Communications, culture, geography, hiking, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, Maps, States, trails, transportation, Travel, walking and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s