Longest underwater highway tunnels


Source: popularmechanics.com

Entrance to Tokyo Bay Tunnel – Source: popularmechanics.com

When it became apparent that a list of underwater highway tunnels by order of their length could not be found on the internet, I decided to put one together. The list is not comprehensive and meant to be a continuous work in progress, so if you know of additional underwater highway tunnels (open, under construction, or planned) that have been missed, please feel free to pass them along. Updates to the list will be made regularly.

The list provides the name of the tunnel, the year of completion in parenthesis, the city/nation Those tunnels where the length is not known are listed at the end.

  1. Solbakk (uc) – Stavanger, Norway = 46,904 feet
  2. Harbour (prop) – Copenhagen, Denmark = 30-40,000 feet
  3. Tokyo Bay (1997) – Tokyo, Japan = 31,498 feet
  4. Xiamen West (uc, 2017) – Xiamen, China = 29,627 feet
  5. Shanghai Yangtze River (2009) – Shanghai, China = 29,040 feet
  6. Bomlafjord (2000) – Stord, Norway = 25,952 feet
  7. Eiksund (2008) – Volda, Norway = 25,547 feet
  8. Kamoy (2013) – Norway = 25,322 feet
  9. Oslofjord (2000) – Oslo, Norway = 23,787 feet
  10. Nordkapp (1999) – Nordkapp, Norway = 22,609 feet
  11. Westerschelde (2003) – Netherlands = 21,655 feet
  12. Hundvåg (uc) – Stavanger, Norway = 20,900 feet
  13. Qind-Huang (2011) – Qingdao City, China = 20,238 feet
  14. Xiamen Xiang’an (2010) – Xiamen, China = 19,358 feet
  15. Byfjord (1992) – Stavanger, Norway = 19,329 feet
  16. Hvalfjörður (1998) – Reykjavik, Iceland = 18,929 feet
  17. Finnoy (2009) – Norway = 18,912 feet
  18. Atlantehav (2009) – Norway = 18,785 feet
  19. Dublin Port (2006) – Dublin, Ireland =18,702 feet
  20. Hitra (1994) – Hitra, Norway = 18,572 feet
  21. Eurasia (uc, 2016) – Istanbul, Turkey = 17,717 feet
  22. Froya (2000) – Norway = 17,400 feet
  23. Hongmei Road South (uc, 2015) – Shanghai, China = 17,258 feet
  24. Freifjord (1992) – Norway = 16,682 feet
  25. Vaga (2002) – Faroe Islands = 16,203 feet
  26. Clem Jones (2010) – Brisbane, Australia = 15,744 feet
  27. Maracaibo Fixed Link 2 (uc) – Maracaibo, Venezuela = 14,436 feet
  28. Mastrafjord (1992) – Norway = 14.511 feet
  29. Valderoy (1987) – Norway = 13,848 feet
  30. Halsnoy (2008) – Norway = 13,514 feet
  31. Drogden/Oresund (2000) – Copenhagen/Malmo, Denmark/Sweden = 13,287 feet
  32. Godoy (1988) – Norway = 12,608 feet
  33. Hvaler (1989) – Norway  = 12,303 feet
  34. Eiganes (uc, 2019) – Stavanger, Norway = 12,136 feet
  35. Wuhan-Changjiang (2008) – Wuhan, China = 11,838 feet
  36. Ellingsoy (1987) – Norway = 11,546 feet
  37. Tromsoysund (1994) – Norway = 11,480 feet
  38. Kanmon (1958) – Japan = 11,352 feet
  39. Ibestad (2000) – Norway = 11,139 feet
  40. Eastern Harbour Crossing (1989) – Hong Kong, China = 11,088 fee
  41. Sloverfjord (1997) – Norway = 10,945 feet
  42. Elbe (1975) – Hamburg, Germany = 10,939 feet
  43. Koje-do  (2009) – Busan, South Korea = 10,824 feet
  44. Queensway (1934) – Liverpool, United Kingdom = 10,630 feet
  45. Suez Canal (prop) – Port Said, Egypt = 9,843 feet
  46. Suez Canal (prop) – Suez, Egypt – 9,843 feet
  47. Musko (1964) – Sweden = 9,709 feet
  48. Vardo (1982) – Norway = 9,479 feet
  49. Sydney Harbour (1992) – Sydney, NSW, Australia = 9,187 feet
  50. Changjiang Road (uc, 2015) – Shanghai, China = 9,187 feet
  51. Brooklyn-Battery (1950) – New York City, NY = 9.117 feet
  52. Holland (1927) – New York City, NY/NJ, USA = 8,557 feet
  53. Ted Williams (1995) – Boston, MA, USA = 8,448 feet
  54. Lincoln (1945/1957) = New York City, NY/NJ, USA = 8,216 feet
  55. Thimble Shoal Channel (1964) – Hampton Roads, VA, USA = 8,187 feet
  56. Chesapeake Channel (1964) – Hampton Roads, VA, USA = 7,941 feet
  57. Fort McHenry (1985) – Baltimore, MD, USA = 7,920 feet
  58. Kingsway (1971) – Liverpool, United Kingdom = 7,874 feet
  59. Coatzacoalcos (uc, 2016) Coatzacoalcos, Mexico = 7,501 feet
  60. Hampton Roads (1957) – Hampton Roads, VA, USA = 7,479 feet
  61. Baltimore Harbor (1957) – Baltimore, MD, USA = 7,392 feet
  62. Guadalquivir I (prop) – Seville, Spain = 7,172 feet
  63. Ring Road/Gulf (2011) – St. Petersburg, Russia – 6,562 feet
  64. Western Harbour (1997) – Hong Kong, China = 6,498 feet
  65. Queens Midtown (1940) – New York City, NY, USA = 6,414 feet
  66. Guadalquivir II (prop) – Seville, Spain = 6,251 feet
  67. Piet Hein (1997) – Amsterdam, Netherlands = 6,234 feet
  68. Cross Harbour (1972) – Hong Kong, China = 6,103 feet
  69. Santos-Guaruja (prop) – Santos, Brazil = 5,578 feet
  70. Sumner (1934) – Boston, MA, USA = 5,653 feet
  71. Tyne (1967/2011) – Newcastle, United Kingdom = 5,500 feet
  72. Ij (1968) – Amsterdam, Netherlands = 5,369 feet
  73. Ahmed Hamdi (1981) – Egypt = 5,348 feet
  74. Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine – Montreal, QC, Canada = 5,280 feet
  75. Orlovski (2016) – St. Petersburg, Russia = 5,250 feet
  76. Weser (2004) – Bremerhaven, Germany = 5,250 feet
  77. Aktio–Preveza Undersea – Aktio, Greece (2002) = 5,165 feet
  78. Detroit-Windsor (1930) – Detroit, MI/ON, USA/Canada = 5,160 feet
  79. Callahan (1961) – Boston, MA, USA = 5,070 feet
  80. Monitor-Merrimac Memorial (1992) – Hampton Roads, VA, USA = 4,800 feet
  81. Vistula (2015) – Gdansk, Poland = 4,921 feet
  82. Maas (1942) – Rotterdam, Netherlands = 4,517 feet
  83. Liefkenshoek (1991) – Antwerp, Belgium = 4,488 feet
  84. Blackwall (west) (1897) – London, United Kingdom = 4,440 feet
  85. Coen (1966/2013) – Amsterdam, Netherlands = 4,221 feet
  86. PortMiami (2014) – Miami, FL, USA = 4,200 feet
  87. Midtown (1962 ) – Hampton Roads, VA, USA = 4,194 feet
  88. Nord (1992) – Netherlands = 4,178 feet
  89. Sluiskil (2015) – Netherlands = 3,937 feet
  90. Blackwall (east) (1967) – London, United Kingdom = 3,852 feet
  91. Downtown (1952/1989) – Hampton Roads, VA, USA = 3,813/3,350 feet
  92. Washburn (1950) – Houston, TX, USA = 3,791 feet
  93. Posey Tube (1928) – Oakland, CA, USA = 3,545 feet (Thank you, John)
  94. Bankhead (1941) – Mobile, AL, USA = 3,389 feet
  95. Webster Street Tube (1963) – Oakland, CA, USA = 3,350 feet (Thank you, John)
  96. George C. Wallace (1973) – Mobile, AL, USA = 3,000 feet
  97. Thorold (1967) – St. Catharines, ON, Canada = 2,756 feet
  98. Rostok (2003) – Rostock, Germany = 2,599 feet
  99. Kennedy (1969) – Antwerp, Belgium = 2,270 feet
  100. Massey (1959) – Vancouver, BC, Canada = 2,063 feet
  101. Belle Chase (1956) – New Orleans, LA, USA = 1,938 feet
  102. Gote (2017) – Gothenburg, Sweden – 1,645 feet
  103. Old Elbe/St. Pauli (1911) – Hamburg, Germany = 1,398 feet
  104. Townline (1972) – Welland, ON, Canada = 1,080 feet
  105. Harvey (1957) – New Orleans, LA, USA = 1,080 feet
  106. East Main Street (1972) – Welland, ON, Canada = 1,000 feet +/-
  107. Central-Wan Chai (2015) – Hong Kong, China = 987 feet
  108. Houma (2013) – Houma, LA, USA = 960 feet (Thank you, John)
  109. Henry Kinney (1960) – Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA = 864 feet
  110. Melocheville (1957) – Melocheville, QC, Canada = 747 feet
  111. Saint Remi (1954) – Montreal, QC, Canada = 486 feet
  112. Houma (1961) – Houma, LA, USA = unknown

Sources:

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8 Responses to Longest underwater highway tunnels

  1. How do people and goods get air for ventilation,in case of a fire how do they evacuate and remove exhaust/burnt gases?.

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    • Generally, long tunnels have ventilation systems, though in case of fires there have been problems with smoke and gas buildup. The best answers to your question will be found by researching the operators of each individual tunnel you’re interested in.

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  2. John Mercurio says:

    Here are two more you can add:
    Posey Tube, Oakland-Alameda, California 3545 ft., blt. 1928
    Webster Street Tube, Oakland-Alameda, California 3350 Ft. blt. 1963

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  3. John Mercurio says:

    Houma is 960 ft. long and was open as of June, 2013.

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  4. What about the BART tunnel from San Francisco to East Bay in California?

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