Nurturing world peace one pagoda at a time


Pokhara, Nepal Peace Pagoda - Source: tripod.com

Pokhara, Nepal Peace Pagoda – Source: andrewmiller via tripod.com

Until recently, I was unaware of the Peace Pagoda (or Shanti Stupa) program initially begun by the late Nichidatsu Fujii and is continued today by the Nipponzan Myohoji Buddhists. This awe-inspiring effort to promote peace throughout the world began in 1947 as a way of honoring and remembering those who died in the atomic attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  Since then, nearly 80 Peace Pagodas have been built around the globe and at least two that I am aware of are under construction presently.

Given that the Dalai Lama’s 80th birthday (according to the Tibetan calendar) is being celebrated this coming weekend (June 21st), I could not think of a better way to honor that most auspicious event than to write a post on these magnificent structures, at least two of which he formally dedicated.

Milton Keynes, UK Peace Pagoda - Source: tripadvisor.co.uk

Milton Keynes, UK Peace Pagoda – Source: tripadvisor.co.uk

Here is a list of the Peace Pagodas, where they are located, and the year of their completion. Needless to say, many of them are situated on breathtaking sites.

Hiroshima, Japan Peace Pagoda - Source: buddaquotesonline.blogspot.com

Hiroshima, Japan Peace Pagoda – Source: buddaquotesonline.blogspot.com

When available, a weblink has been provided to information about the Peace Pagoda. Peace.

Darjeeling, India Peace pagoda - Source: the himalayabeacon.com

Darjeeling, India Peace pagoda – Source: the himalayabeacon.com

Asia

India

Japan

  • Hanaokayama, Japan (1954)
  • Fukui, Japan (1959)
  • Sapporo, Japan (1959)
  • Kushiro, Japan (1959)
  • Himeji, Japan (1960)
  • Atami, Japan (1961)
  • Hidasakagami, Japan (1961)
  • Wakamatsu, Japan (1962)
  • Osaka, Japan (1963)
  • Gotemba, Shizuoka, Japan (1964)
  • Fushiki, Japan (1964)
  • Aomori, Japan (1964)
  • Hiroshima, Japan (1966)
  • Nitsu, Japan (1967)
  • Komoro, Japan (1967)
  • Sensuikyo, Japan (1967)
  • Akita, Japan (1967)
  • Kiyosumi, Japan (1969)
  • Wakasa, Japan (1969)
  • Omuta, Japan (1969)
  • Nagasaki, Japan (1970)
  • Hyuga, Japan (1970)
  • Tatsunokuchi, Japan (1970)
  • Hondo, Japan (1972)
  • Yamaga, Japan (1972)
  • Buzen, Japan (1972)
  • Miyazaki, Japan (1972)
  • Koufu, Japan (1972)
  • Kominato, Japan (1972)
  • Usuki, Japan (1974)
  • Sendai, Japan (1974)
  • Sadiochinosawa, Japan (1974)
  • Okutama, Japan (1974)
  • Kanazawa, Japan (1974)
  • Yui, Japan (1976)
  • Yoshino, Japan (1976)
  • Takamon, Japan (1976)
  • Chitose, Japan (1978)
  • Takarazuka, Japan (1979)
  • Gifu, Japan (1979)
  • Takeda, Japan (1979)
  • Tagonoura, Japan (1981)
  • Sado Ryotsu, Japan (1981)
  • Tokyo, Japan (1983)
  • Maizuru, Japan (1983)
  • Nizon, Japan (1986)
  • Hisayama, Japan (1986)
  • Beppu, Japan (1987)
  • Omura, Japan (1989)
  • Mikawa, Japan (1994)
  • Midori, Japan (1999)
  • Narita-shi, Chiba-ken, Japan (2001)
  • Mount Momomnataki, Japan (2002)
  • Takarazuka, Japan
  • Aso, Japan ?
  • Kobe, Japan ?
  • Utsunomiya, Japan

Nepal

Sri Lanka

Ampara, Sri Lanka Peace Pagoda - Source: journals,worldnomads.com

Ampara, Sri Lanka Peace Pagoda – Source: journals,worldnomads.com

Europe

Austria

United Kingdom

Italy

Ukraine

Grafton, NY, USA Peace Pagoda - Source: Robert-marchessault.blogspot.com

Grafton, NY, USA Peace Pagoda – Source: Robert-marchessault.blogspot.com

North America

Mexico

  • Los Álamos, Valle de Bravo, Mexico (under construction)

United States

Ladkah, India Peace Pagoda - Source: en.academic.ru

Ladakh, India Peace Pagoda – Source: en.academic.ru

SOURCES: 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in architecture, art, Asia, charities, cities, civics, civility, Communications, culture, diversity, Europe, geography, historic preservation, history, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, India, land use, landscape architecture, Love, Maps, Mexico, North America, peace, placemaking, planning, Religion, skylines, spatial design, Statistics, third places, tourism, Travel, UK, writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Nurturing world peace one pagoda at a time

  1. Pingback: Nepal 14 – 21st April 2017 – Yalla Safri

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s