America’s loneliest cities


Source: amazon.com

Source: amazon.com

The following are America’s 20 loneliest larger cities – those with the most single-person households as of 2014. As is evident from the data, cities in Upstate New York, Ohio, Florida, and Virginia tend to be the most lonely (when measured by single-person households).

  1. Atlanta, Georgia = 47,8 percent
  2. Santa Monica, California = 47.4 percent
  3. Cincinnati, Ohio = 46.3 percent
  4. East Orange, New Jersey = 45.6 percent
  5. New Haven, Connecticut = 45.5 percent
  6. St. Louis, Missouri = 45.2 percent
  7. Washington, District of Columbia = 44.5 percent
  8. Southfield, Michigan = 44.4 percent
  9. Alexandria, Virginia = 43.9 percent
  10. Wilmington, Delaware = 43.6 percent
  11. Miami Beach, Florida = 43.6 percent
  12. Albany, New York = 43.2 percent
  13. Richmond, Virginia = 43.1 percent
  14. New Orleans, Louisiana = 42.9 percent
  15. Cleveland, Ohio = 42.5 percent
  16. Schenectady, New York = 42.2 percent
  17. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania = 42.2 percent
  18. Rochester, New York = 41.9 percent
  19. Fort Lauderdale, Florida = 41.6 percent
  20. Dayton, Ohio = 41.6 percent

SOURCE: http://www.statista.com/statistics/242304/top-10-us-cities-by-percentage-of-one-person-households/

Cities which have larger percentages of single-person households have a variety of land use and planning issues that other cities may not face to the same degree. Among them are the need for more, yet smaller housing units and the potential for gentrification in those neighborhoods where single-households are clustered.

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This entry was posted in cities, demographics, density, futurism, gentrification, geography, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, planning, spatial design, Statistics, urban planning and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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