Curtiss-Wright pre-depression era airports – UPDATED


c-w

Source: pinterest.com

Provided below is information on those airports which were owned and/or operated by Curtiss Aviation, later Curtiss-Wright Aviation prior to and just after the onset of the Great Depression. These airports were the earliest attempt at privatized airport ownership in the United States, something that remains a rarity here compared to Europe, Asia, and Australia. New information on Raleigh provided below.

Baltimore: Curtiss-Wright/Pimlico Airport – 260 acres – formerly at the SW corner of Green Spring and Smith Roads.

Chicago (Glenview) – Curtiss-Reynolds Field – 130 acres – opened October 20, 1929, just nine days prior to the Wall Street Crash – became Glenview Naval Air Station in 1940.

Cleveland: Curtiss-Wright Airport – 660 acres (originally 271 acres) in Richmond Heights – still in operation as Cuyahoga County Airport.

Dallas- Fort Worth (Grand Prairie): Curtiss-Wright Airport  – 275 acres at Jefferson Street and Carrier Parkway. The site was acquired by the Navy in 1942 and has since been developed.

Denver: Curtiss Aviation Field – 330 acres – later Park Hill Airport, then Hayden Airport, and now the site has been developed – the field was situated on Colorado Boulevard in the NE section of the city

Houston: could not locate information other than an advertisement which indicated they had an airport here.

Los Angeles (Glendale): Grand Central Air Terminal – purchased by Curtiss-Wright in 1929. The buildings still remain and are owned by Disney, but the runway is now Grand Central Avenue.

Louisville: other than a Curtiss-Wright Flying Service facility at Bowman Field, no other information has been found.

Milwaukee: Curtiss-Wright Field – opened in 1930 on 131 acres and sold in 1945 – now known as Timmerman Airport – still in operation as a general aviation facility.

Minneapolis-St. Paul (Falcon Heights): Curtiss Northwest Airport or Curtiss Twin City Airport – established in 1919 and closed in 1930 – the site is now developed, though a portion of it is occupied by Curtiss Field Park. This was Minnesota’s first full-service airport.

New York City:

Oakland (Alameda): Alameda Airport – opened in 1927 and included a seaplane base – operated by Curtiss, but not owned by them. Converted to Alameda Naval Air Station in 1940.

Oklahoma City (The Village): Curtiss-Wright Field – 160 acres – later Wiley Post Airport, but now the site has been built over with subdivisions.

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Curtiss-Bettis Field south of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh (West Mifflin): Curtiss-Bettis Field – 144 acres – sold in 1949 and replaced by Allegheny County Airport – redeveloped as the site of the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory.

Raleigh: Curtiss Field – opened in 1929 and later became Raleigh Municipal Airport – closed in 1973.

St. Louis (Cahokia, IL): Curtiss-Steinberg Airport – opened in 1929 – now Downtown Airport – located across the river in Illinois and is still in operation.

San Francisco (Belmont): Curtiss-Wright Airport – 114 acres – the airport closed in the early-mid 1950s and the site is now developed.

ADDITIONAL SOURCES:

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One Response to Curtiss-Wright pre-depression era airports – UPDATED

  1. Michael Bludworth says:

    Houston’s C-W Field was located near where OST and Main St currently intersect. Nearby was Main St. Airport and Wells Field. However, I can’t find any information that the C-W was ever little more than a name – it didn’t last. I’d like to see your advertisement!

    Like

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