World’s largest “boro” and “borough” suffix cities

 

Greensboro, NC – Source: pixels.com

Continuing with our city name suffix series, below are the world’s largest cities ending in “boro” or “borough.” Please note there a a few cities in the UK that use a slight variation of “brough,” as well and these have been included. As with previous lists the minimum population requirement for inclusion is 10,000 residents.

Based on the tally, variations of Attleboro(ugh) are most common with three, followed by Waynesboro, Middle(s)born(ugh), and Hillsboro(ugh) with two listings each. Outside of the UK, Massachusetts and North Carolina have the most “boro(ough)” cities and towns. As always, additions, corrections, or suggestions are always welcome here on panethos.wordpress.com. Cheers!

  1. Greensboro, North Carolina = 294,722 (2018 est.)
  2. Peterborough, England, UK = 202,259 (2019 est.) Thank you, Margaret!
  3. Middlesbrough, England, UK = 174,700 (2018 est.)
  4. Murfreesboro, Tennessee = 141,344 (2018 est.)
  5. Hillsboro, Oregon = 108,389 (2018 est.)
  6. Peterborough, Ontario = 81,032 (2016)
  7. Jonesboro, Arkansas = 76,990 (2018 est.)
  8. Farnborough, England, UK = 65,034 (2011)
  9. Scarborough, England, UK = 61,749 (2011)
  10. Owensboro, Kentucky = 59,809 (2018 est.)
  11. Loughborough, England, UK = 59,317 (2011)
  12. Attleboro, Massachusetts = 45,117 (2018 est.)
  13. Marlborough, Massachusetts = 39,825 (2018 est.)
  14. Goldsboro, North Carolina = 34,234 (2018 est.)
  15. Statesboro, North Carolina = 31,667 (2018 est.)
  16. North Attleborough, Massachusetts = 28,712 (2000)
  17. Asheboro, North Carolina = 25,844 (2018 est.)
  18. Middleboro, Massachusetts = 23,117 (2010)
  19. Market Harborough, England, UK = 22,911 (2011)
  20. Gainsborough, England, UK = 22,841 (2011)
  21. Waynesboro, Virginia = 22,628 (2018 est.)
  22. Carrboro, North Carolina = 21,344 (2018 est.)
  23. Crowborough, England, UK = 20,607 (2011)
  24. Glassboro, New Jersey = 19,992 (2018 est.)
  25. Springboro, Ohio = 18,794 (2018 est.)
  26. Westborough, Massachusetts = 18,272 (2010)
  27. Guisborough, England, UK = 17,777 (2011)
  28. Foxboro, Massachusetts = 16,693 (2010)
  29. Streetsboro, Ohio = 16,503 (2018 est.)
  30. Knaresborough, England, UK = 15,441 (2011)
  31. Scottsboro, Alabama = 14,405 (2018 est.)
  32. Conisbrough, England, UK = 14,333 (2011)
  33. Northborough, Massachusetts = 14,155 (2010)
  34. Brattleboro, Vermont = 12,056 (2010)
  35. Masonboro, North Carolina = 11,812 (2000)
  36. Hillsborough, California = 11,444 (2018 est.)
  37. Tyngsborough, Massachusetts = 11,292 (2010)
  38. Waynesboro, Pennsylvania = 10,874 (2018 est.)
  39. Tarboro, North Carolina = 10,844 (2018 est.)
  40. Desborough, England, UK = 10,697 (2011)
  41. Attleborough, England, UK = 10,482 (2011)

If the topic of English place names interests you, these two books are available through Amazon.*

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*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using these links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

  • en.wikipedia.org
  • personal knowledge
  • 2019 Rand McNally Road Atlas
  • maps.google.com
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8 Responses to World’s largest “boro” and “borough” suffix cities

  1. Dan Tilque says:

    Interesting note on these suffixes. In 1891, the newly created US Board on Geographic Names came up with certain rules to standardize the spelling of cities and towns. Among other rules, it said all -borough’s should be changed to -boro’s. In 1894, the Post Office put the rules into effect. However, a number of towns have since reverted to their original spelling, so we’re back to a mix of suffixes. However, the -boro ending still dominates among US town names.

    Another change they promulgated at the same time was to change all -burgh’s to -burg’s. Pittsburgh fought a long battle with the Post Office in the early 20th century to retain its -h.

    This is all described on page 342 of Names on the Land by George R. Stewart, a book I recommend to anyone interested in US place names.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: World’s largest “burg,” “burgh,” or “bourg” suffix cities | Panethos

  3. Margaret Pike says:

    Was wondering if Peterborough, England was deliberately omitted–at 202,259 it would be the largest -borough in the UK (omitting Edinburgh of course.) Not to be persnickety, just wondering if there is a reason I missed!

    Liked by 1 person

    • problogic says:

      Nope. My error. Will add ASAP. Thank you for letting me know about the oversight. Rick

      Like

    • problogic says:

      It is now included. Thank you again.

      Like

      • Margaret Pike says:

        Not a problem, and thank you for the very interesting page. I love place name etymology. As a former resident of Greensboro, NC, I always thought it was a shame they dropped the -ugh ending but I never realized it was because of a post office decision! Explains it, although it’s interesting that some places managed to resist it. I was wondering if it looks a bit illiterate to a British eye. I remember driving in the UK near Gainsborough and seeing it as Gainsboro’ on a road sign, but that seems to be the only way it would be written like that.

        Like

  4. KC says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. I just wanted you to know that it is missing Scarborough, Maine, however.

    Liked by 1 person

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