World’s longest inclined ‘urban’ transport elevator routes

Source: reddit.com

An inclined elevator is an elevator that generally operates on a diagonal slope (or inclination) versus moving vertically straight up and down. **While inclined elevators are very similar to funiculars, they differ in the fact that an inclined elevator uses a hydraulic or cable pulley system with a winch or non-car counterweight. Funiculars on the otherhand, use a cable connection between the two (2) cars to counterbalance each other during operation.**

Le Treport, France – Source: twitter.com

Here’s the list of the longest inclined ‘urban’ transport elevator routes. Please note that some of them on this list still use the term “funicular” in their name even though they are technically “inclined elevators.” This is noted whenever possible in italics.

Ascensore Inclinato di Quezzi – Genoa, Italy – Source: goamagazine.it

Additional information, when known is provided including the elevation gain and the degree of inclination. Instead of separating segments of each elevator listed below, its entire length is listed whether portions are diagonal, horizontal, or vertical. However, if the segments are physically separated and require riders to transfer between segments, then those are categorized separately.

Edmonton, AB, Canada – Source: edmonton.ca

Those inclined elevators situated in rural areas, located on private properties and/or are for limited/personal use, and those used for a purpose other than urban transportation such as ski lifts are not included on this list. As always, any additional, corrections, or suggestions are most welcome. Cheers!

1. Olympic Stadium Tower – Montreal, QC, Canada = 873 feet in length and approximately 540 feet in elevation change at a 45 degree inclination – passes through a tunnel at the base (1976)

2. -tie Fortress Shuttle – Koblenz, Germany = 853 feet in length and 308 feet in elevation change at varying inclination ranging between 14 and 27 degrees (2011); and

  • Innerwaldshuttle – Solden, Austria = 853 feet in length and 352 feet in elevation change with a 23 to 32 degree inclination (2010) – double track

4. Gateway Arch Tram – St.. Louis, MO, USA = 748 feet (1965)

5. Moses Mabhida Stadium Observation Deck Elevator – Durban, South Africa = 689 feet in length (2010)

6. Kukullaga Station Inclined Elevator – Bilbao, Spain = 623 feet in length and 315 feet in elevation change with a 30 degree inclination – two tracks (2019)

7. Château Gütsch/Gütschwald Inclined Elevator – Lucerne, Switzerland = 577 feet in length and 269 feet of elevation change at a grade of 27.9 inclination (2015)

8. Le Treport Funicular – Le Treport, France = 508 feet in length at a 63 degree inclination (1908/2006) – converted to an inclined elevator in 2006 – two (2) sets of double track and passes through a tunnel part way up the hillside

9.-tie Ascensore Inclinator di Quezzi – Genoa, Italy = 430 feet in length, including 89 feet in a tunnel and 249 feet of elevation change at 44.1 degree and 30.3 degree inclinations (2015); and

  • Odessa Funicular – Odessa, Ukraine = 430 feet in length (2005) – double track – re- constructed as an inclined elevator in 2005.

11. Skyview Inclined Elevator – Stockholm, Sweden = 425 feet – two (2) tracks (1989)

12. Ascensore Villa Scassi/Sampierdarena – Genoa, Italy = 423 feet in length, including 313 feet in a tunnel and 97 feet of elevation change at a 54 degree inclination (2016) – replaced a 1977 system

13. Eiffel Tower Inclined Elevators – Paris, France = 420 feet in length and 380 feet of elevation change (2001) – four (4) inclined elevators between the ground and second level

14. Ljubljana Castle Funicular – Ljubljana, Slovenia = 386 feet in length and 230 feet of elevation change (2006)

15. Montmartre (Funicular) Elevator – Paris, France = 354 feet in length and 118 feet of elevation change at a 35.2 degree inclination (1900/1935/1991) – double track – converted to an inclined elevator in 1991 – 2 million passengers annually

16. Oriental Pearl Tower Inclined Elevator – Shanghai, China = 335 feet in length and 279 feet in elevation change at a 60 degree inclination (1994/2017) – inclined elevator added in 2017)

17. Göhren Beach Inclined Lift – Gohren, Germany = 328 feet in length and 98 feet in elevation change at an inclination ranging between 15 and 40 degrees (2014)

18. Mi Teleferico Aerial Tramway Station 17 feeder – La Paz, Bolivia = 243 feet in length and 85 feet of elevation change (2015)

19. Cityliner Viborg – Viborg, Denmark = 230 feet in length (2007)

20. 100 Street Funicular – Edmonton, AB, Canada = 216 feet in length and 98 feet of elevation change at a 23.5 degree inclination (2017)

21. Gediminas Hill Lift – Vilnius, Lithuania = 213 feet in length and 128 feet of elevation change at a 37 degree inclination (2003)

22. Mer de Glace Inclined Elevator – Nendaz, Switzerland = 212 feet in length with a 35 degree inclination (2012)

23. Creek Street Funicular Tram – Ketchikan, AK, USA = 211 feet in length and 130 feet of elevation change

24.-tie Quebec City Funicular – Quebec City, QC, Canada = 210 feet in length and 194 feet of elevation change (1879/1946/1998) – double track – converted to an inclined elevator in 1998; and

  • Zurbaranbarri Inclined Elevator – Bilbao, Spain = 210 feet in length

26.-tie Porte D’Orleans Inclined Lift – Paris, France = 197 feet in length at a 25 degree inclination

  • Elevator da Santo Andre’ – Covilha, Portugal = 197 feet in length with a 29 degree inclination (2009)

28. Train Station Inclined Elevator – Le Locle, Switzerland = 194 feet in length and an elevation change of 79 feet (2014)

29. City Link – Ebbw Vale, Wales, UK = 187 feet in length and 70 feet in elevation change at 31 degree inclination (2015)

30. Hudson Yards Subway Station Inclined Elevators – New York City, NY, USA = 172 feet in length and 82 feet in elevation change (2015)

31. Parliament Hill Peace Tower Inclined Elevator – Ottawa, ON, Canada = 171 feet in length and 158 feet in elevation change varying between vertical, horizontal, and a 10 degree inclination (1981)

32. Uptown Inclined Elevator – Mels, Switzerland = 159 feet in length and 102 feet of elevation change at a 40 degree inclination (2019)

33. Bärenpark Inclined Elevator – Berne, Switzerland = 151 feet in length and 66 feet in elevation change (2015) – passes through the bear enclosure in the park

34. The Vessel Hudson Yards Inclined Elevator – New York City, NY, USA = 139 feet (2020)

35. Cityplace/Uptown Station Inclined Elevator – Dallas, TX, USA = 135 feet in length (2000) – two (2) tracks

36. Elevator da Goldra – Covilha, Portugal = 131 feet in length at a 32 degree inclination (2013)

37. Prim Street Inclined Lift – Bilbao, Spain = 118 feet in length and 66 feet of elevation change – two (2) tracks

38. Sellin Pier Inclined Elevator – Seebruck, Germany =105 feet in length and 56 feet in elevation change at a 33 degree inclination (1927/2003) – converted to an inclined lift during restoration in 2003

39. Pico do Jaraguá Ascensore – São Paulo, Brazil = 100 feet in length

40. Wettingen Inclined Elevator – Wettingen, Switzerland = 90 feet in length and 62 feet in elevation change (2016)

41. Millennium Bridge Incline Lift – London, England, UK = 88 feet in length at a 13.6 degree inclination (2003)

Prim Inclined Elevator – Bilbao, Spain – Source: http://www.funimag.com/photoblog/index.php/tag/artxanda/

Length unknown (more data needed):

  • Huntington Station – Alexandria, VA, USA = (1983)
  • Panoramic Lift – Cuneo, Italy = 90 feet of elevation change (2009)
  • Strand Beach Inclined Elevator – Dana Point, CA, USA (2009)
  • Convention Center Inclined Elevator – San Diego, CA, USA
  • John Ball Zoo Inclined Elevator – Grand Rapids, MI, USA (2012)
  • Namsan Oreumi Elevator – Seoul, South Korea
  • Convention Centre Inclined Elevator- Edmonton, AB Canada
  • Kek Lok Si Temple Inclined Elevator – Penang, Malaysia (2014)
  • Tyne Tunnel Cyclist and Pedestrian Tunnels Inclined Elevator, UK
  • Saint-Lazare Station (Paris Metro) – Paris, France
  • Mergellina Station (Naples Metro) – Naples, Italy (2007)

SOURCES:

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