Ranking the longest cable-stayed bridge for each state

 

Gordie Howe International Bridge – Source: enr.com

Below are the rankings of the longest cable-stayed bridge in each state as measured by the main span(s) of the bridge, as of March 6. 2021. Ties are included, so some states may appear more than once as a result. When a bridge crosses state lines, both states are included, unless there is another cable-stayed bridge which is longer for one of the states. Those bridges shown in italics, the author has traveled across

Any additions, corrections, or suggestions are most welcome.

  1. Michigan (Detroit): Gordie Howe International Bridge (2024) = 2,799′ main span

2. Texas (Corpus Christi): New Harbor Bridge (2021) = 1,661′ main span

Corpus Christi’s New Harbor Bridge compared to the former – Source: ccbiznews.com

3. Louisiana (St. Francisville): John James Audubon Bridge (2011) = 1,583′ main span

4. South Carolina (Charleston): Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge (2005) = 1,546′ main span

5. tie – Missouri (St. Louis)/Illinois (East St. Louis): Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge (2104)  and Arkansas (Arkansas City)/Mississippi (Benoit): Charles W. Dean Bridge (proposed) = 1,500′ main span

7. Florida (Jacksonville): Dames Point Bridge (1989) = 1,300′ main span

8. Georgia (Brunswick): Sidney Lanier Bridge (2003) = 1,250′ main span

9. – 3-way tie- Indiana (Jeffersonville)/Kentucky (Louisville): Lewis and Clark Bridge (2016); Indiana (Rockport)/Kentucky (Owensboro): William H. Natcher Bridge (2002); and New York (Tarrytown): New Tappan Zee Bridge (2017) = 1,200′ main span

12. Maine (Bucksport): Penobscot Narrows Bridge (2006) = 1,161′ main span

13. Pennsylvania (North Versailles): New Monongahela River Bridge (proposed) = 1,120′ main span

14. Ohio (Maysville): William H. Harsha Bridge (2000) = 1,050′ main span

15. California (Long Beach): Gerald Desmond Bridge (2020) = 1,003′ main span

16. Washington (Tri-Cities): Ed Hendler Intercity Bridge (1978) = 981′ main span

17. Delaware (Bethany Beach): Indian River Inlet Bridge (2012) = 950′ main span

18. West Virginia (Huntington): East Huntington Bridge (1985) = 900′ main span

19. Alabama (Mobile): Cochrane–Africatown USA Bridge (1991) = 781′ main span

20. Oregon (Portland): Tilikum Crossing (2015) = 780′ main span

21. Massachusetts (Boston): Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge (2003) = 745′ main span

22. New Jersey (Elizabeth): Goethals Bridge (2017) = 672′ main span

23. Iowa (Burlington): Great River Bridge (1993) = 660′ main span

24. Virginia (Richmond): Varina-Enon Bridge (1990) = 630′ main span

25. Minnesota (Stillwater)/Wisconsin (Houlton): Saint Croix Crossing (2017) = 599′ main span

26. Puerto Rico (Naranjito): Jesús Izcoa Moure Bridge (2008) = 518′ main span

27. Connecticut (New Haven): Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge (2016) = 517′ main span

28. Nebraska (Omaha): Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge (2008) = 506′ main span

29. Alaska (Sitka): John O’Connell Bridge (1972) = 450′ main span

30. Kansas (Wichita): Keeper Of The Plains Bridge (2007) = 225′ main span

31. Montana (Missoula): California Street Pedestrian Bridge (1999) = 201′ main span

32. Utah (Salt Lake City): George S. Eccles 2002 Legacy Bridge (2001) = 170′ main span

33. Maryland (Baltimore): Patterson Viaduct Pedestrian Bridge (2006) = 164′ main span

34. District of Columbia: New Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge (2022) = 150′ main span

35. Colorado (Denver): Denver Millennium Footbridge (2002) = 132′ main span

36. Tennessee (Benton): Ocoee River Cable-Stayed Bridge (1995) = main span length is  unknown/336′ total length

  • Arizona: none known
  • Hawaii: none known
  • Idaho: none known
  • Nevada: none known
  • New Hampshire: none known
  • New Mexico: none known
  • North Carolina: none known
  • North Dakota: none known
  • Oklahoma: none known
  • Rhode Island: none known
  • South Dakota: none known
  • Vermont: none known
  • Wyoming: none known

SOURCES:

 

 

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