Working list of Totem Poles of 25 feet or greater in height

The following is a working list of totem poles that are 25 feet in height or greater. One difficulty with such a list is that some of the totem poles are standing, others are in storage awaiting repair or rehabilitation, others are placed/stored in museums, and some have been laid to rest in a nearby forest. The list is nearly constantly fluid as weather, age, decay, vandalism, and other factors affect the count.

Source: travel2unlimited.com

This list attempts to include those that are either currently standing, in storage, or displayed in museums, parks, and the like. If known, totems that are under construction (correct term?) are included too. In addition both originals still existence and their replicas are included. Replicas are an important method for maintaining the integrity of a site without risking the loss of a treasured original. When a totem decays/ages to the point where restoration is impossible or impractical they are laid to rest in the forest.

Totems at Totem Bight State Park – Source: experienceketchikan.com

The list is certainly not comprehensive and any updates, additions, or corrections would be most welcome and appreciated. Furthermore, the list likely includes totem poles that were not necessarily carved by Native Americans or First Nation’s peoples. It only is meant to identify the tallest totem poles. Those shown in italics have been seen by the author.

Tallest single tree totems:

  1. McKinleyville, CA (1961) = 144 feet 8 inches (not including the antenna at top)
  2. Kalama, WA (1962) = 140 feet
  3. Kake, AK (1967) = 132 feet
  4. Victoria, BC (Beacon Hill Park -1956) = 127 feet 7 inches
  5. Tacoma, WA (Fireman’s Park – 1903) = 105 feet
  6. Vancouver, BC (Maritime Museum/Hadden Park – 1958) = 100 feet
  7. Vancouver BC (Vanier  – 1958) = 100 feet
  8. London, England, UK (Windsor Great Park – 1958) = 100 feet
  9. Chicago/Abingdon, IL (1969) = 83 feet
  10. Olympia, WA (State Capitol; Story/Spirit pole – 1940) = 80 feet – in storage for restoration?

Tallest multi-tree totem:

  1. Alert Bay, BC = 173 feet
  2. Orlando, FL (Walt Disney World, Wilderness Lodge I – 1994) – 55 feet
  3. Orlando, FL (Walt Disney World, Wilderness Lodge II – 1994) – 55 feet

Other totem poles with known heights (minimum 25 feet):

  • Montreal, QC (Museum of Fine Arts- 2017) = 69 feet
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina (Canada Square – 1963) = 65 feet – gift from Canada
  • La Conner, WA (replica of 1938 “Centennial” – 1989) = 61.5 feet
  • Gitlaxt’amiks, BC (High School: Utility – 1977) = 60 feet
  • Ottawa, ON (Scouts Canada – 1961) = 60 feet
  • Seattle, WA (Pioneer Square – 1940) = 60 feet – carved replica of the original
  • Suquamish, WA (Clearwater Casino: Northgate – 1952)= 59 feet – originally at Northgate Mall in Seattle
  • Wrangell, AK (Chief Shakes Island: Sun Totem – 1940) = 58 feet
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK – (Saanaheit Pole – 1941 replica) 55 feet, 5 inches
  • Chicago, IL (Grant Park/Field Museum: “Big Beaver” – 1982) = 55 feet
  • Ketchikan, AK (Chief Johnson Memorial – 1989) = 55 feet
  • Old Massett, BC (Chief Edenshaw Memorial -1998) = 55 feet
  • Vancouver, BC (UBC Campus: Reconciliation – 2017) = 55 feet (67 feet with base)
  • Seattle, WA (Elliott Bay Trail: Tlingit – 1975) = 52 feet
  • Hiellen, BC (Hiellen Longhouse Village – 2017) = 51 feet
  • Everett, WA (Totem Family Diner -1923) = 50 feet – in storage for restoration
  • Portland OR (Zoo: “Centennial” – 1959) = 50 feet
  • Juneau-Douglas, AK (Auke Village Recreation Area: Big Dipper – 1941) = 47 feet
  • Stockton, CA (once in Victory Park – 1930) = 46 feet – in storage for restoration
  • Chicago/Bridgeport, IL (Boys and Girls Club: twin “Frontal” – 1941) = 45-50 feet
  • Jasper, AB (“Two Brothers” – 2011) = 45 feet
  • North Vancouver, BC (Capitano Mall: “Children of the People”) = 45 feet
  • Fall City, WA (1934) = 43 feet
  • Vancouver, BC (University of BC: Musqueam Warrior – 2012) = 41 feet
  • Vancouver, BC (University of BC Museum of Anthropology: Tatensit – 1900) = 40 feet 1 inch
  • Albuquerque, NM (University of NM Hibben Center – 1907) = 40 feet
  • Chicago/Lincoln Park, IL (Lakefront &  Addison: “Kwanusila” – 1986) = 40 feet – original 40′ pole from 1929 sent to BC Museum of Anthropology for care
  • Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (Royal Museum: “Small Hat” – 1855) = 40 feet
  • Haines, AK (Haines Elementary School: “Friendship”) = 40 feet
  • Juneau-Douglas, AK (Savikko Park: “Yanyeidi Wolf” – 2018) = 40 feet
  • Juneau-Douglas, AK (Centennial Hall: “Wooshkeetaan” – 1980) = 40 feet – undergoing restoration
  • Ketchikan, AK (Indian Community Building: “Tlingit”) = 40 feet
  • Old Massett, BC (St. John’s Church – 1971) = 40 feet
  • Port Ludlow, WA (Burner Point/Port Ludlow Resort – 1995) = 40 feet
  • Queen Charlotte, BC (Skidegate Hospital:”Monumental” – 2018) = 40 feet
  • Spokane, WA (Vinegar Flats) = 40-50 feet
  • Vancouver, BC (Native Housing Society – 2012) = 40 feet
  • Vienna, Austria (Schoenbrunn Zoo: “Nass River” – 2002) = 39.5 feet
  • Blyn, WA (Jamestown Family Health Center) = 38 feet
  • Freeport, IL (Krape Park – 1935) = 38 feet – taken down in 2008 due to decay – to be displayed in a Seattle museum
  • Vancouver, BC (University of BC, Museum of Anthropology: “Memorial”) = 37 feet 8 inches
  • Victoria, BC (Thunderbird Park: “Gitxsan” – 1960) = 37 feet 8 inches – replica
  • Oxford, England, UK (Pitt Rivers Museum – 1901) = 37’4″
  • Edmonton, AB (Borden Park/Royal Alberta Museum: “Ksan” – 1983) = 37 feet
  • Haines, AK (Chilkat Center: “Raven”) = 37 feet
  • Klawock, AK (“Veterans” 2018) = 37 feet
  • Victoria, BC (BC Museum: “Haida Frontal” – 1982) = 36 feet 2 inches
  • Seattle, WA (U of W Burke Museum: “Welcome” – 2001) = 36 feet
  • Blyn, WA (7 Cedars Casino: “Supernatural World I”) = 35 feet
  • Blyn, WA (7 Cedars Casino: “Supernatural World II”) = 35 feet
  • Haines, AK (Tribal House: Friendship pole) = 35 feet
  • Wyandotte, MI (1971) = 35 feet
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK (Yaadaas Crest Pole – circa 1890/1939 partially replicated) = 35 feet
  • Duncan, BC – (Charles Hoey Park: “Centennial” – 2012) = 34 feet
  • Seattle, WA (Seattle Center: “John Williams Memorial” – 2012) = 34 feet
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK (Mosquito Legend Pole – 1939 replica) = 33 feet 4 inches
  • St. Catharines, ON (Centennial Park: “Centennial” – carved by Douglas Cramer, 1966) = 33 feet – to undergo restoration
  • Whitehorse, Yukon Territory (Waterfront: “Healing” – 2012) = 33 feet
  • Blyn, WA (7 Cedars Casino: “Natural Elements”) = 32 feet
  • Blyn, WA (7 Cedars Casino: “Elements for Success”) = 32 feet
  • Lake Tahoe, CA (private residence: twin poles) = 32 feet each
  • Salford, England, UK (in storage – 1969) = 32 feet – gift to Manchester from Canada
  • Sitka National Historical Park (Gaanaxadi/Raven CrestPole) = 32 feet
  • Juneau-Douglas, AK (“Governor’s” – 1940) = 31 feet 6 inches
  • Victoria, BC (BC Museum: “Running Wolf” – 1980) = 30 feet 3 inches
  • Bremerton, WA (Crownhill School – 1970s) = 30 feet
  • Haines, AK (Tribal House: “Raven”) = 30 feet
  • Ketchikan, AK (Totem Bight State Park: Wandering Raven House Entrance) = 30 feet
  • Oak Bay, BC (Totem Super Service – 1931 ) = 30 feet – moved since 2007
  • Orlando, FL (EPCOT Canada Pavilion – 1998) = 30 feet
  • Portland, OR (Community College, Sylvania campus: “Welcoming”) = 30 feet
  • Port Orchard, WA (Marina Park: Gerald Grosso Memorial – 1989) = 30 feet +/-
  • Seattle, WA (Totem House Restaurant – 1936) = 30 feet – being restored
  • Bristol, VA (Sugar Hollow Park – 2013) = 30 feet
  • Sequim, WA (Civic Center: Sun Always Shines in Sequim – 2015) = 30 feet
  • Vancouver, BC (UBC Museum of Anthropology: Raven House Frontal – 1870) = 29.5 feet
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK – (Raven/Shark Pole -1939 replica) = 29 feet, 3 inches
  • Chicago, IL (U of Chicago/Haskell Hall – 1948/1987) = 29 feet
  • Gig Harbor, WA (Pioneer Way – 1979) = 28 feet – moved after 2015
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK (Lakic’inei Pole 1939 replica) = 28 feet
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK (Trader Legend Pole- 1942 replica)= 27 feet 3 inches
  • Los Angeles, CA (Knott’s Berry Farm -1992) = 27 feet – likely not carved by Native carvers
  • Port Townsend, WA (Northwest Maritime Center – 2019) = 27 feet
  • Seattle, WA (Northwest Hospital: “Eagle’s Spirit” – 2017) = 27 feet
  • Vancouver, BC (Pigeon Park: Survivor’s – 2016) = 27 feet
  • Cape Fox, AK (1899) = 26 feet – formerly in the Field Museum in Chicago
  • Juneau-Douglas, AK (Gastineau School: Raven – 2017) = 26 feet
  • Juneau-Douglas, AK (Sealaska Indian Village: Eagle – 2014) = 26 feet
  • Juneau-Douglas, AK (Sealaska Indian Village: Raven – 2014) = 26 feet
  • Burnaby, BC (Centennial – 1967) = 25 feet – in storage
  • Coquitlam BC (Poirier Community Centre: Centennial – 1967) = 25 feet
  • Ketchikan, AK (Indian Community Building: Tsimshian) = 25 feet
  • Ketchikan, AK (Indian Community Building: Haida) = 25 feet
  • New Westminster, BC (Queens Park: Centennial – 1967) = 25 feet
  • Seattle, WA (Belvedere Viewpoint Park –  2006) = 25 feet
  • Surrey, BC (Old City Hall: Centennial – 1967) = 25 feet
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK (Frog/Raven Pole) = 25 feet
  • Lummi Nation, WA (Traveling Totem – 2021) = 25 feet

Other totem poles that are possible 25′ +

  • Bergen, Norway – gift from sister city of Seattle in 1970
  • Blyn, WA (Jamestown Administration Building – twin poles)
  • Boise, ID – Capital
  • Centennial Pole (1989) and Mosquito Pole in Capilano Bridge Park
    Capilano RV Park
  • Gitanyou, BC
  • Lelu  Island
  • Sitka National Historical Park, AK (Centennial Pole)
  • Spokane, WA – (4) – Riverfront Park, Fort Wright College, school, and Country Homes Boulevard (1967) = 23 feet
  • La Conner, WA (Swinish Tribal Center: “Centennial” – 1938)
  • Merrill, WI – (Normal Park: “Lincoln Centennial” – 1974)
  • Whitehorse, Yukon Territory (Rotary Peace Park: “Friendship” – 1973)
  • Hazleton, BC (Ksan Historical Village) or Hazelton, Kispiox, Kitwanga, and Gitanyow.
    Hope, BC
  • Manette, WA (1100 Wheaton Way – 1978)
  • Vancouver, BC (Maritime Museum: Centennial – 1958) undergoing restoration – twin in Windsor Great Park, UK

Book sources:

  • Barberau, Marius, Totem Poles: According to Location, 1990.
  • Garfield, Viola E. and Linn A. Forest, The Wolf and the Raven: Totem Poles of Southeastern Alaska, 1984. 
  • Patrick, Andrew, The Most Striking of Objects: The Totem Poles of Sitka National Historical Park, 2012.
  • Stewart, Hilary, Looking at Totem Poles, 1993.

Web Based sources:

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