Some snippets from the newly released 2020 Census data

Source: commerce.gov

While most headlines will likely tout the continued growth of the South and West, some cities in the East and North have some bragging to do, as well:

  • Cincinnati, OH (309,317); Buffalo, NY (278,349); Rochester, NY (211,328); and Syracuse, NY (148,620) all notched their first population increase since the 1950 Census!
  • Scranton, PA notched a small (+239 people), but hugely significant increase in population – its first since 1930!

The largest city bragging rights have changed in two (2) states:

  • Nashville (689,447) passed Memphis (633,104) to become the largest city in Tennessee.
  • Huntsville (215,006) leapt past Birmingham (200,733), Montgomery (200,603), and Mobile (187,041) to become the largest city in Alabama.

Meanwhile, some parts of the Sunbelt are not looking so sunny:

Memphis, TN; Jackson, MS; Birmingham, AL; Montgomery, AL; Mobile, AL; Baton Rouge, LA; Shreveport, LA; Hampton, VA; Wichita Falls, TX; Beaumont, TX; and Lawton, OK all lost population over the past decade.

Four (4) cities are on the verge of attaining million person status and could reach that number by 2030 if they continue to grow at the same rate they did the past decade – they are:

  • Austin, TX = 961,855
  • Jacksonville, FL = 949,611
  • Fort Worth, TX = 918,915
  • Columbus, OH = 905,748

Several older suburbs of Detroit are showing renewed resiliency. These include:

  • Dearborn = 109,976 or +12.4% – first time above the 100,000 threshold since 1970
  • Hamtramck = 28,433 or +26.8% – highest population since 1960
  • Dearborn Heights = 63,292 or +9.6% – first population increase since 1970
  • Melvindale = 12,851 or +19.9% – first population increase since 1970
  • Pontiac = 61,606 or +3.5% – first population increase since 1970
  • Lincoln Park = 40,245 – first population increase since 1960

SOURCES:

  • census.gov
  • en.wikipedia.org for each city

This entry was posted in cities, commerce, demographics, density, economic development, geography, history, Housing, immigration, land use, planning, sprawl, States, Statistics, urban planning and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.