Great seaports from space – East Asia

Some of the best seaport images yet, come from East Asia. Enjoy!

Inchon, South Korea - Source:

Incheon, South Korea – Source: ark.co.kr

Kaohsiung, Taiwan - Source: reocities.com

Kaohsiung, Taiwan – Source: reocities.com

Kobe, Japan - Source:

Kobe, Japan – Source: eorc.jaxa.jp

Tainjin, China - Source: chinadaily.com.cn

Tainjin, China – Source: chinadaily.com.cn

Tokyo, Japan - Source:

Tokyo, Japan (great view of Haneda International Airport too) – Source: eoearth.org

Vladivostok, Russia - Source: earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Vladivostok, Russia – Source: earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Great seaports from space – Southeast Asia

Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong, China - Source:

Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong, China – Source: esa.int

Manila, Philippines - Source:

Manila, Philippines – Source: visualphotos.com

Penang/Georgetown, Malaysia - Source:

Penang/Georgetown, Malaysia – Source:penangcentral.com

Singapore - Source:

Singapore – Source: viewsfromsatellite.blogspot.com

Surabaya, Indonesia - Source: satimagingcorp.com

Surabaya, Indonesia – Source: satimagingcorp.com

Great seaports from space – South Asia

Jawaharlal_Nehru_Port_tRUST-0x600

Jawaharla Nehru Port, India – Source: Google-Cnes/pot Image, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye

karachi_ali_2010008

Karachi, Pakistan – Source: earthobservatory.nasa.gov

mumbai-satellite_1125538i

Mumbai, India – Source: telegraph.co.uk

 

Great seaports from space – Middle East

Below are five great seaports of the Middle East – Abu Dhabi, UAE; Haifa, Israel; Izmir, Turkey; Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; and Port Said/Fuad, Egypt.

Abu, Dhabi, UAE - Source:

Abu Dhabi, UAE – Source: simple.wikipedia.org

Haifa, Israel - Source:

Haifa, Israel – Source: emap-int.com

Izmir, Turkey - Source:

Izmir, Turkey – Source: izmir.gen.tr

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia - Source:

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia – Source: globalsecurity.org

Port Said/Fuad, Egypt - Source: dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2575840/The-breathtaking-LIVE-satellite-footage-Earth-accurate-watch-cars-street-planes-taking-off.html

Port Said/Fuad, Egypt – Source: dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2575840/The-breathtaking-LIVE-satellite-footage-Earth-accurate-watch-cars-street-planes-taking-off.html

“Odessa” – where dreams and nightmares collide

Source: charles-king.net/odessa-genius-a-death.html

Source: charles-king.net/odessa-genius-a-death.html

When I purchased the Kindle e-book Odessa, Genius and Death in a City of Dreams,  I was excited to learn more about the Russian and Ukrainian history pertaining to this famous seaport founded by Catherine the Great. Never did I ever imagine that the dramatic history contained in this fine book by Charles King would become a precursor and essential prerequisite to a better understanding of the tragic events of the past month. As the third largest city in present-day Ukraine, the history of Odessa is a microcosm of that nation’s story – a diverse and sometimes divisive blend of Ottoman, Russian, Greek, Italian, Cossack, Jewish, Orthodox, German, Slavic, Romanian, Soviet, and Ukrainian cultures all rolled into one.

A magnificent seaport city set aside the Black Sea, Odessa is a relatively young city by European standards, but those 220 years are packed with a series of major events that have defined this metropolis. Unfortunately, the unique mix of cultures that set Odessa apart from most of its counterparts in its first century of existence were decimated by a series of nightmarish acts (both internal and external) that have left the city as a hollow shell of its former glory.  Pogroms, epidemics, purges, forced relocation, ethnic cleansing, revolution, warfare, and revisionism have left untold scars upon this once urban beacon of hope, faith, diversity, reluctant acceptance, and economic prosperity.

As strife has yet again returned to the Ukraine, one can only hope and pray that Odessa and the nation as a whole will survive this latest ordeal without undue bloodshed and suffering. Hopefully, this city that once held so much promise as a multicultural beacon can someday return to its rightful position as a leading center of acceptance and shared prosperity. To do otherwise would be a pity and a great loss for humanity as a whole.

Here are selected quotes from this excellent book, some of which are strikingly similar to the ongoing situation there right now:

“Odessa has stood out as a mixed and rambunctious city, an island of difference between sea and steppe, yet a place continually threatened by its own mottled personality.

“From its founding in 1794 all the way to the present, Odessa has struggled to survive somewhere between success and suicide.”

“In the end, Odessa’s experience reveals the creative power as well as the everyday difficulty of being diverse.”

“Visitors don’t arrive in Odessa so much as stumble upon it.”

“But the sea [Black Sea] also offered two things that the Russians in particular desired: ports that were ice-free for most of the winter and potential access to the Mediterranean.”

“Both seaborne and overland commerce made Odessa the centerpiece of an expanding international network that tied the city more to its European counterparts than to the imperial metropolises of St. Petersburg and Moscow.”

“In relatively short order, Odessans became as status conscious as persons in other major cities.”

“A climate of social freedom was readily apparent. Public smoking, fashions that bordered on the scandalous, and public discussion of contentious issues from international affairs to taxes were relatively uncommon privileges in St. Petersburg and Moscow, but they were part of the normal street life in Odessa.”

“Odessa was founded by foreigners in Russian service, and that heritage reproduced itself generation after generation.”

“Odessa’s commercial success lay in its position at the intersection of flatlands and seascape, where the produce of the former could be sent to markets across the latter.”

“The tsar’s secret police began to see the multilingual and cosmopolitan city as a breeding ground for agitators, saboteurs, and terrorists – because in large part it was.”

“Odessa’s civilized core seemed to have withered and blown out to sea.”

“How could a city generally satisfied with its easy cosmopolitanism fall so speedily into communal chaos?

“After the revolution, however, Odessa seemed mainly a place of departure.”

“As a major cultural center, with long-standing times to Western forms of art and music, Odessa was an obvious target for labeling as a den of spies and wreckers.”

“In one of the least-known episodes of the Holocaust, at least 220,000 Jews were killed in or en route to string of ghettos and concentration camps established in portions of Soviet Ukraine and overseen by the Romanian state.”

“Odessa was one f the first four Soviet cities – along with Leningrad, Sevastopol, and Stalingrad – to be awarded the title of Gorod-Geroi, or “hero city.”

“But over the last two centuries, Odessa managed to produce a local culture woven from uneasiness, way of living that may hold lessons about the creative and destructive power of being in-between.”

World’s sky-high civilian air traffic control towers – UPDATE

King Abdulaziz Airport's future tower - Source: airport-technology.com

King Abdul Aziz Airport’s future tower – Source: airport-technology.com

After a thorough search for a detailed list of the world’s tallest civilian air traffic control towers proved to be fruitless on the internet, I decided to try to create one of my own. Below is a working list of those air traffic control towers across the globe that exceed 100 feet in height along with the year the tower was completed, when known, provided in parenthesis.

Cairo Control Tower - Source: airportsinternational.com

Cairo Control Tower – Source: airportsinternational.com

Please note that some variation in height may occur as certain sources simply listed the height to the floor of the cab, while others list it to the top of the cab. Whenever possible, I used the top of the tower/cab. For those towers where I was certain the data was only to the floor, ten feet was added to represent the total height. Those with (est.) listed next to the height were calculated using FAA Airport Diagrams and NAV Canada Aerodrome Charts that provided the elevation of the control tower and then subtracted the nearest ground elevation.

While I was hoping that this list would be more comprehensive, not all statistical information on air traffic control towers is readily available or accessible on the internet. At the bottom of the primary list is a second one identifying airports with control towers that are likely 100 feet or more in height based on internet images, but the exact height has not been verified, despite a month plus long search.

Bangkok Control Tower - Source: europe-autos.com

Bangkok Control Tower – Source: europe-autos.com

Similar to office skyscrapers, the height of the tallest air traffic control towers has been rising over time. First, here is a brief summary of the tallest air traffic control tower for each continent, except Antarctica.

  • Africa – Cairo, Egypt at 361 feet
  • Asia – Jeddah, Saudi Arabia at 446 feet when completed in 2014
  • Europe – Paris (De Gaulle – north), France at 367 feet
  • North America – Atlanta, Georgia, USA at 398 feet
  • Oceania – Melbourne and Perth, Australia tied at 262 feet
  • South America – Bogota, Columbia at 292 feet
Atlanta Control Tower - tripadvisor.com

Atlanta Control Tower – tripadvisor.com

Please feel free to submit any additional data to help fill in the blanks (so to speak) and so this dataset may be updated on a regular basis. Any and all additions are appreciated. Thanks! Updates to the list are shown in bold.

  1. Jeddah (King Abdul Aziz), Saudi Arabia – 446 ft. (2014)
  2. Bangkok (Suvarnabhumi), Thailand – 434 ft. (2005)
  3. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - 425 ft.
  4. Atlanta (Hartsfield), GA - 398 ft. (2006)
  5. Tokyo (Haneda), Japan – 380 ft. (2010)
  6. Wuhan (Tianhe), China – 377 ft (2013)
  7. Istanbul (Gokcen), Turkey – 367 ft. (2012)
  8. Paris (De Gaulle – primary/north) – 367 ft. (2005)
  9. Cairo, Egypt – 361 ft. (2010)
  10. Guanzhou, China – 361 ft. (2003)
  11. Vienna, Austria – 361 ft. (2005)
  12. Abu Dhabi, UAE – 360 ft.
  13. Las Vegas, (McCarran) NV – 352 ft. (2015)
  14. Indianapolis, IN - 348 ft. (2005)
  15. Orlando (International), FL – 345 ft. (2002)
  16. Denver (Centennial), CO – 340 ft.
  17. Houston (Intercontinental), TX - 336 ft.
  18. Memphis, TN – 336 ft.
  19. Phoenix (Sky Harbor), AZ - 335 ft.
  20. Shanghai (Pudong), China – 335 ft.
  21. Amsterdam (Schiphol – primary), Netherlands – 331 ft. (1991)
  22. Muscat (Seeb), Oman – 331 ft. (2011)
  23. Seoul (Incheon), Korea – 329 ft. (2001)
  24. Delhi (Indira Ghandi), India – 328 ft.
  25. Tel Aviv (Ben Gurion III) – 328 ft. (2014)
  26. Salt Lake City, UT – 328 ft.
  27. Denver (International), CO – 327 ft.
  28. Kunming, China – 325 ft. (2011)
  29. Newark (Liberty), NJ – 325 ft. (2002)
  30. Washington (Dulles – primary), DC – 325 ft. (2008)
  31. Cleveland (Hopkins), OH – 324 ft. (2014)
  32. Beijing, China – 323 ft.
  33. Miami, FL – 320 ft. (2000)
  34. New York City (JFK), NY – 320 ft. (1992)
  35. Cancun, Mexico – 315 ft. (2009)
  36. Calgary, Canada – 300 ft. (2012)
  37. Oslo, Norway – 299 ft.
  38. Dubai (World Central), UAE – 298 ft. (2010)
  39. Chengdu (Shuangliu), China – 296 ft. (2011)
  40. Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW – primary), TX – 295 ft.
  41. Nagoya (Chubu Centrair), Japan – 295 ft. (2005)
  42. Paris (De Gaulle – south) – 295 ft. (1999)
  43. Bogota (Eldorado), Columbia – 292 ft. (2014)
  44. Hanoi (Noi Bai), Vietnam – 289 ft. (2009)
  45. Amman (Queen Alia), Jordan – 288 ft. (2010)
  46. Boston (Logan), MA – 285 ft. (1973)
  47. London (Heathrow), UK – 285 ft. (2005)
  48. Tokyo (Narita), Japan – 285 ft.
  49. Osaka (Kansai), Japan – 282 ft. (1995)
  50. Dusseldorf, Germany – 280 ft. (2002)
  51. Doha (New), Qatar – 279 ft. (2013)
  52. Hammamet, Tunisia – 279 ft. (2009)
  53. Dublin, Ireland – 279 ft. (2012)
  54. Stockholm (Arlanda), Sweden – 279 ft.
  55. Los Angeles (LAX), CA – 277 ft. (1996)
  56. Damman (King Fahd), Saudi Arabia – 276 ft.
  57. Mumbai, India – 275 ft. (2013)
  58. Hong Kong, China – 273 ft. (1997)
  59. Manila, Philippines – 272 ft.
  60. Louisville, KY – 270 ft. (1997)
  61. Seattle-Tacoma (Sea-Tac), WA – 269 ft. (2001)
  62. Boise, ID – 268 ft. (2010)
  63. Portland, OR – 266 ft.
  64. Riyadh (King Khalid), Saudi Arabia – 266 ft.
  65. Buenos Aires (Ezeiza), Argentina – 262 ft. (2011)
  66. Melbourne (Tullamarine), Australia – 262 ft. (2012)
  67. Perth, Australia – 262 ft. (1987)
  68. Singapore (Changi), Singapore – 262 ft. (1981)
  69. Chicago (O’Hare – primary), IL – 260 ft.
  70. Kansas City, MO – 257 ft. (1996)
  71. Tokyo (Haneda) – 255 ft. (old tower)
  72. Dayton (Cox), OH – 254 ft. (2010)
  73. Cincinnati, OH/KY – 252 ft. (1998)
  74. Detroit (Metro – primary), MI – 250 ft. (2002)
  75. Brisbane, Australia – 246 ft. (1985)
  76. Munich, Germany – 246 ft.
  77. Paris (De Gaulle – central), France – 246 ft. (1970)
  78. Leipzig, Germany – 240 ft. (1999)
  79. Palm Beach, FL – 240 ft. (2011)
  80. Pittsburgh, PA – 240 ft.
  81. Spokane, WA – 239 ft. (2007)
  82. Algiers, Algeria – 236 ft. (2013)
  83. Berlin (Brandenburg) – 236 ft. (2012)
  84. Copenhagen, Denmark – 236 ft. (2007)
  85. Hyderabad (Rajiv Ghandi), India – 236 ft. (2008)
  86. Oakland, CA – 236 ft. (2013)
  87. Madrid (Barajas), Spain – 233 ft. (1997)
  88. New York City (La Guardia) – 233 ft. (2009)
  89. Dallas/Forth Worth (DFW) – 232 ft. (1972)
  90. Bangaluru, India – 230 ft
  91. Frankfurt, Germany – 230 ft. (2011)
  92. Milan (Malpensa), Italy – 230 ft.
  93. Huntsville, AL – 228 ft. (2008)
  94. Austin (Bergstrom), TX – 227 ft. (1987)
  95. Tampa, FL – 227 ft. (1972)
  96. Naypyitaw, Myanmar – 226 ft. (2012)
  97. Chicago (O’Hare – north) – 225 ft. (2008)
  98. Athens, Greece – 224 ft. (2001) — Thank you, Nikos!
  99. Columbus, OH – 224 ft. (2003)
  100. Hannover (DFS), Germany – 223 ft.
  101. San Antonio, TX – 221 ft. (1986)
  102. San Francisco, CA  – 221 ft. (2014)
  103. Taipei (Taoyuan), Taiwan – est. 221 ft.
  104. Nairobi, Kenya – 220 ft. (1978)
  105. Chicago (O’Hare – south), IL – 218 ft. (2015)
  106. Toronto (Pearson – primary), Canada – 215 ft. (1998)
  107. Albuquerque, NM – est. 214 ft.
  108. New Orleans (Armstrong), LA – est. 214 ft.
  109. Paris (De Gaulle – 4), France – 213 ft. (2012)
  110. Sao Paulo (Campinas/Viracopos), Brazil – 213 ft.  (2005)
  111. Tripoli, Libya – 213 ft.
  112. Vancouver, Canada – 213 ft. (1996)
  113. Durban (King Shaka), South Africa – 210 ft. (2011)
  114. Philadelphia (Terminal 1 ramp), PA – 207 ft. (2001)
  115. Sacramento, CA – 205 ft. (2014)
  116. Barcelona (El Prat – primary), Spain – 203 ft. (2004)
  117. Washington (Reagan), DC – 201 ft. (1997)
  118. Fort Wayne, IN – 200 ft. (2006)
  119. Kochi (Cochin), India – 200 ft.
  120. Milwaukee (General Mitchell), WI – 200 ft.
  121. Raleigh-Durham, NC – 200 ft. (1987)
  122. Birmingham, AL – 198 ft. (2000)
  123. Amsterdam (Schiphol – west) – 197 ft. (2004)
  124. Brussels, Belgium – 197 ft. (2005)
  125. Cologne-Bonn, Germany – 197 ft.
  126. Kuwait City, Kuwait – 197 ft. (1986)
  127. London (Stansted), UK – 197 ft. (1991)
  128. Manchester, UK – 197 ft. (2013)
  129. Roanoke, VA – 197 ft. (2004)
  130. Santiago (Benitez), Chile – 197 ft. (2001)
  131. Reno-Tahoe, NV – 195 ft. (2010)
  132. Surabaya, Indonesia – 195 ft.
  133. Washington (Dulles – original), DC – 193 ft. (1962)
  134. Denver (Front Range), CO – 191 ft. (2005)
  135. Charleston, SC – est. 187 ft.
  136. Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, FL – est. 187 ft.
  137. Rome (Da Vinci) – 187 ft. (1957)
  138. Salalah, Oman – 187 ft. (2014)
  139. Edinburgh (Turnhouse), UK – 186 ft. (2005)
  140. Baghdad, Iraq – 185 ft.
  141. Khartoum, Sudan – 184 ft. (2016)
  142. Zagreb, Croatia – 181 ft. (2011)
  143. Kutaisi, Georgia – 180 ft.
  144. Liverpool (John Lennon), UK – 180 ft. (2002)
  145. Trondheim, Norway – 180 ft. (2005)
  146. Malaga, Spain – 179 ft. (2002)
  147. Richmond, VA – 178 ft.
  148. Barcelona (El Prat – south), Spain – 176 ft. (2011)
  149. Venice (Marco Polo), Italy – 174 ft. (2011)
  150. Yekaterinburg, Russia – 174 ft. (2010)
  151. Nottingham (East Midlands), UK – 172 ft.
  152. Paris (Orly), France – 171 ft. (1966)
  153. Santiago de Campestela, Spain – 171 ft. (2007)
  154. Donetsk, Ukraine – 167 ft. (2011)
  155. Sydney (Kingsford Smith), Australia – 167 ft. (1996)
  156. Winnipeg, Canada – est. 167 ft.
  157. Kalamazoo/Battle Creek, MI – 166 ft. (2013)
  158. Dakar, Senegal – 164 ft. (2014)
  159. Manama, Bahrain – 164 ft. (2005)
  160. Sofia, Bulgaria – 164 ft. (2012)
  161. Edmonton (International), Canada – est. 163 ft. (2012)
  162. Everett (Paine), WA – 162 ft. (2003)
  163. Nashville, TN – est. 162 ft.
  164. Traverse City (Cherry Capital), MI – 160 ft. (2012)
  165. Buffalo/Niagara Falls, NY – 159 ft. (1994)
  166. New York City (MacArthur), NY – 159 ft. (2011)
  167. Cairns, Australia – 157 ft. (1990)
  168. London (Luton), UK – 157 ft.
  169. Nurnberg, Germany – 157 ft. (1998)
  170. Nicosia (Larnaca), Cyprus – est. 156 ft.
  171. St. Louis (Lambert), MO – est 156 ft. (1997)
  172. Allentown (Lehigh Valley) – 155 ft. (1996)
  173. Alicante, Spain – 154 ft. (1997)
  174. Colorado Springs, CO – est. 153 ft.
  175. Newcastle, UK – 151 ft. (2007)
  176. Detroit (Metro – Smith Terminal), MI – 150 ft. (1957)
  177. Hartford (Bradley), CT – 150 ft.
  178. Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN – 150 ft.
  179. Missoula, MT – 150 ft. (2013)
  180. Basra, Iraq – 148 ft. (1988)
  181. Christchurch, NZ – 148 ft. (2009)
  182. Panama City (Northwest Florida Beaches), FL – 148 ft. (2010)
  183. Tel Aviv (Ben Gurion), Israel – 148 ft.
  184. El Paso, TX – 147 ft.
  185. Houston (Hobby), TX – 147 ft. (2000)
  186. Abilene, TX – 145 ft. (2012)
  187. Newport News-Williamsburg, VA – 145 ft (2007)
  188. Sao Paulo (Congonhas), Brazil – 145 ft. (2010) — Thank you, Fernando!
  189. Adelaide, Australia – 144 ft. (2012)
  190. Rochester (Monroe County), NY – est. 142 ft.
  191. Wichita Falls, TX – 142 ft. (2006)
  192. Harrisburg, PA – est. 141 ft.
  193. St. Louis (Downtown), IL/MO – 141 ft. (2007)
  194. Bratislava, Slovakia – 140 ft. (1998) — Thank you, John!
  195. Atlanta (DeKalb-Peachtree), GA – 138 ft. (1988)
  196. Bilbao (Sondica), Spain – 138 ft. (1990)
  197. Geneva, Switzerland – 138 ft. (1984)
  198. Nuremberg, Germany – 138 ft. (1999)
  199. Philadelphia (primary), PA – est. 138 ft.
  200. Prague, Czech Republic – 138 ft. (1972) — Thank you, John!
  201. Grand Rapids (Ford), MI – est. 136 ft.
  202. Alguaire, Spain – 135 ft. (2009)
  203. Tenerife Norte, Canary Islands – 135 ft. (2011)
  204. Norfolk, VA – 134 ft. (1995)
  205. Quito, Equador – 134 ft. (2013)
  206. Greenwood, Canada – est. 132 ft.
  207. Astana, Kazakhstan – 131 ft. (2005)
  208. Corpus Christi, TX – 131 ft. (2001)
  209. Fortaleza (Martins), Brazil – 131 ft. (2009)
  210. Melbourne (Tullamarine – old), Australia – 131 ft.
  211. Moscow, Russia – 131 ft. (2012)
  212. Zurich, Switzerland – 131 ft. (1986)
  213. Little Rock (Clinton National), AR – 130 ft.
  214. Mobile (Regional), AL – est. 130 ft.
  215. Eagle (County), CO – 128 ft. (2003)
  216. Jersey, UK – 128 ft. (2010)
  217. Punta Gorda (Charlotte County), FL – 127 ft. (2012)
  218. Goose Bay, Canada – est. 126 ft.
  219. Addis Ababa (Bole), Ethiopia – 125 ft.
  220. Denver (Rocky Mountain), CO – 125 ft. (2012)
  221. Billings (Logan), MT – 120 ft. (2006)
  222. Eugene, OR – est. 120 ft.
  223. Greensboro (Piedmont Triad), NC – est. 120 ft.
  224. Gulfport-Biloxi, MS – 120 ft. (2010)
  225. Oshkosh (Wittman), WI – 120 ft. (2009)
  226. Dallas-Fort Worth (Arlington), TX – 119 ft. (2006)
  227. Keahole-Kona, HI – 118 ft. (2012)
  228. Luxor, Egypt – 118 ft.
  229. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, PA – 118 ft.
  230. Fort Lauderdale (Executive), FL – 117 ft.
  231. Farnborough, UK – 116 ft. (2002)
  232. Wichita (Mid-Continent), KS – est. 116 ft.
  233. Bandadanaike, Sri Lanka – 115 ft.
  234. Hambantota, Sri Lanka – 115 ft.
  235. Hamburg, Germany – 115 ft.
  236. Hobart, Australia – 115 ft. (1956)
  237. Iloilo, Philippines – 115 ft. (2007)
  238. Isle of Man (Ronaldsway), UK – 115 ft. (2010)
  239. Luxembourg (Findel) – 115 ft. (1993)
  240. Montreal (Trudeau), Canada – 115 ft.
  241. Sibiu, Romania – 115 ft.
  242. Dallas-Fort Worth (Alliance) – est. 114 ft.
  243. Des Moines, Iowa – est. 113 ft.
  244. Bacaramanga (Palonegro), Columbia – 112 ft.
  245. Cebu (Mactan), Philippines – 112 ft.
  246. Beaumont (Southeast Texas), TX – est. 111 ft.
  247. New York (Stewart), NY – 111 ft.
  248. Marquette (Sawyer), MI – 110 ft.
  249. Ottawa (Cartier), Canada – est. 110 ft.
  250. Birmingham, UK – 108 ft. (2013)
  251. Dallas-Fort Worth (Love) – est. 108 ft.
  252. Pocatello (Regional), ID – est. 108 ft.
  253. Ajaccio, Corsica, France – 107 ft.
  254. Krakow, Poland – 107 ft. (2014)
  255. Topeka (Forbes), KS -107 ft (2003)
  256. Frederick, MD – 106 ft. (2011)
  257. Columbia (Metro), SC – 105 ft.
  258. London (Southend), UK – 105 ft. (2011)
  259. Berlin, Germany – 105 ft. (2007)
  260. Cheyenne, WY – 104 ft. (2002)
  261. Madison (Truax), WI – est. 103 ft.
  262. Bozeman, MT – 102 ft. (1998)
  263. Detroit (Flint Bishop), MI – est. 102 ft.
  264. Guayaquil (de Olmedo), Ecuador – 102 ft. (2006)
  265. Recife, Brazil – 102 ft. (2013)
  266. Wellington, NZ – 102 ft. (2014)
  267. Baltimore (BWI), MD – 100 ft. (1982)
  268. Cheyenne, WY – 100 ft. (2001)
  269. Jackson (Sipes), TN – 100 ft. (1995)
  270. Laredo, TX – est. 100 ft.
  271. Medford (Rogue Valley), OR – 100 ft.
  272. State College (University), PA – 100 ft. (2010)
  273. Vero Beach, FL – 100 ft.
Vero Beach Control Tower - Source: pcl.com

Vero Beach Control Tower – Source: pcl.com

Other airport with control towers of 100 feet or more are listed below, but the exact height has not been confirmed. Any data on these would be appreciated.

  • Aqaba (King Hussein), Jordan
  • Auckland, New Zealand
  • Basel (EuroAirport), Switzerland
  • Beijing (Daxing), China (2017)
  • Bordeaux (Merignac), France (2000)
  • Busan, South Korea
  • Cape Town, South Africa
  • Constantine, Algeria
  • Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW east and west), TX
  • Darwin, Australia
  • Davao City, Philippines
  • Dubai (International), UAE (2001)
  • Gdansk (Walesa), Poland (2004)
  • Ghardaia, Algeria
  • Glasgow (Prestwick), UK
  • Havana (Marti), Cuba
  • Istanbul (Araturk), Turkey
  • Izmir (Menderes), Turkey (2001)
  • Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Johannnesburg (Tamba), South Africa
  • Juanda, Indonesia
  • Kaohsiung, Taiwan (2003)
  • Kazan, Russia (2012)
  • Kingston (Manley), Jamaica (2013)
  • Kinshasa (D’djili), Congo (under construction)
  • Lille, France
  • Medellin (Cordova), Columbia
  • Montevideo, Uraguay
  • Moscow (Sheremetyevo), Russia (2009)
  • Nantes (Atlantique), France
  • Oklahoma City (Will Rogers), OK
  • Oran, Algeria
  • Philadelphia (Northeast), PA
  • Providence (Green), RI
  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Sao Paulo (Gualruhos), Brazil
  • Sendai, Japan
  • Shanghai (Hongqoia), China
  • Southampton, UK
  • Stavanger, Norway
  • Stockholm (Bromma), Sweden (2002)
  • Syracuse (Hancock), NY (1999)
  • Tamanrasset, Algeria
  • Tampere, Finland
  • Toronto (Pearson – apron), Canada (2004)
  • Tromso, Norway
  • Vladivostok, Russia
  • Warsaw (Chopin), Poland
  • Wroclaw (Copernicus), Poland (2001)
Wroclaw Control Tower - Source: jetphotos.net

Wroclaw Control Tower – Source: jetphotos.net

Sources

Double-dipping city/town names

Many of us remember the hilarious double-dip scene above from Seinfeld. Below is my list of cities and towns with double-dipping names. Please feel free to send along any others that I may have overlooked. Enjoy!

Sources: personal knowledge and en.wikipedia.org

Greater Lansing’s 2014 Chinese New Year celebration

Below are a series of images from today’s Greater Lansing 2014 Chinese New Year celebration held inside a local mall. A large crowd attended the festive event which included music, a dragon parade, dancing, a fashion show, martial arts, booths with arts and crafts, and a variety of other cultural and artistic activities.

Happy “Year of the Horse” to all. Enjoy!

0201141321a-1

Photo by Kathy

Photo by Kathy

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Sky-high Ferris wheels – latest urban fad?

Tianjin Eye - Source: chinadaily.com

Tianjin Eye – Source: chinadaily.com

Until the past few days, I had not realized how many cities have added an enormous Ferris wheel as an urban attraction. Yes, I knew of the London Eye and even visited it myself in 2008, though the queue and ticket price were prohibitive to riding it.

London Eye - Source: telegraph.co.uk

London Eye – Source: telegraph.co.uk

Fast forward to today where page three of the American Planning Association’s guide to its 2014 National Planning Conference shows a large Ferris wheel in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. And just last Sunday, I observed a similar Ferris wheel along Seattle’s waterfront from an aerial view of the city during a commercial break in the NFC Championship game.

As planners, we have seen our share of megaproject fads meant to attract people into and revitalize downtown areas – arenas, stadium, enclosed malls, casinos, aquariums, etc. Comparatively, a Ferris wheel can be “relatively” inexpensive. That being said, proposed mega-wheels like the 625 foot tall Ferris wheel on the north end of New York City’s Staten Island, will cost many millions to construct.

Staten Island Wheel Source: pix11.com

Staten Island Wheel – Source: pix11.com

Whether all these wheels will be successful in the long run is a prudent question. The SkyView Ferris wheel that opened in downtown Atlanta in 2013 was originally located in Paris, then Switzerland, and then in Pensacola prior to its current home in the capital city of the Peach State. The 197 foot tall Dublin Wheel in Ireland is another failed example, as it operated for less than two years. Only time will tell whether mega-wheels are a passing fad or a successful entertainment amenity and economic development tool. Aside from Asia, where they seem quite popular, my guess is sky-high Ferris wheels will primarily be successful in unique and specialized locations, but certainly not everywhere. As a result, those that are cities considering such a stratospheric venture should proceed with due diligence, caution, and care.

Another view of the Tianjin Eye - Source: amazingnotes.com

Another view of the Tianjin Eye – Source: amazingnotes.com

Below is a list of those taller fixed Ferris wheels constructed located in “urban settings”. It does not include those installed or erected for temporary events like state fairs or solely within amusement parks.

  • Dubai Eye, UAE – 689 feet (under construction)
  • New York (Staten Island) Wheel, USA – 625 feet (2016)
  • Las Vegas High Roller, USA – 550 feet (2014)
  • Singapore Flyer, Singapore – 541 feet (2008)
  • Nanchang Star, China – 525 feet (2006)
  • London Eye, UK – 445 feet (1999)
  • Changsha Ferris Wheel, China – 394 feet (2004)
  • Fukuoka Sky Dream, Japan – 394 feet (2002)
  • Melbourne Southern Star #2, Australia – 394 feet (2011)
  • Suzhou Ferris Wheel, China – 394 feet (2009)
  • Tianjin Eye, China – 390 feet (2007)
  • Tokyo Diamond and Flower Wheel – 384 feet (2001)
  • Odaiba Dainkanransha, Japan – 377 feet (1999)
  • Yokohama Cosmo Clock 21 #2, Japan – 369 feet (1999)
  • Osaka Tempozan, Japan – 369 feet (1997)
  • Harbin Ferris Wheel, China – 361 feet (2003)
  • Shanghai Ferris Wheel, China – 354 feet (2002)
  • Kitakyushu, Space Eye, Japan – 328 feet
  • Osaka HEP Five Wheel, Japan – 246 feet (1998)
  • Moscow 850, Russia  - 230 feet (1997)
  • Atlanta SkyView, USA – 200 feet (2013)
  • Dublin Wheel, Ireland – 197 feet (2009-2011)
  • Kagoshima Amuran, Japan – 197 feet (2004)
  • Manila Mall of Asia Eye, Philippines – 180 (2011)
  • Niagara Falls Skywheel, Canada – 175 feet (2006)
  • Seattle Great Wheel, USA – 175 feet (2012)

UPDATE: added the following three wheels after the list was first published:

  • Kaohshiung Eye, Taiwan – 164 feet (2002)
  • Chicago Navy Pier, USA – 150 feet (1995)
  • Capetown Cape Wheel, South Africa – 131 feet

Source: en.wikipedia.org unless otherwise highlighted.

Below is a famous Ferris wheel scene from the movie 1941.

India railway map/Nations with most railway miles

Source: mapsofindia.in

Source: mapsofindia.in

Above is a cool 2013 railway map of India. For a little end of the year statistical trivia, below is a list of the 50 nations with the most railway mileage.

United   States

224,792

(2011)
China

98,000

(2012)
Russia

87,157

(2011)
India

65,000

(2012)
Canada

46,552

(2011)
Germany

41,981

(2011)
Australia

38,445

(2011)
Argentina

36,966

(2011)
France

29,640

(2011)
Brazil

28,538

(2011)
South   Africa

20,247

(2013)
Mexico

26,704

(2009)
Italy

24,179

(2007)
Japan

23,474

(2007)
Ukraine

22,300

(2010)
Romania

22,298

(2008)
Poland

19,627

(2008)
United Kingdom

16,321

(2008)
Kazakhstan

15,372

(2010)
Spain

15,947

(2012)
Sweden

12,821

(2010)
Turkey

12,000

(2011)
Iran

11,106

(2008)
Czech   Republic

9,487

(2008)
Indonesia

8,529

(2008)
Hungary

7,942

(2008)
Pakistan

7,791

(2008)
Egypt

6,700

(2010)
Finland

5,919

(2008)
Chile

5,898

(2006)
Austria

5,927

(2008)
Belarus

5,491

(2008)
Sudan

5,478

(2006)
North Korea

5,235

(2006)
Switzerland

5,223

(2011)
Cuba

5,076

(2007)
Algeria

4,316

(2012)
Uzbekistan

4,280

(2011)
Bulgaria

4,159

(2008)
New Zealand

4,128

(2006)
Norway

4,114

(2008)
Thailand

4,071

(2012)
Democratic Republic of the Congo

4,007

(2008)
Myanmar

3,955

(2006)
Serbia

3,809

(2008)
Slovakia

3,658

(2010)
South Korea

3,637

(2011)
Nigeria

3,528

(2006)
Belgium

3,513

(2008)
Turkmenistan

3,181

(2007)