Category Archives: historic preservation

Chris*craft flotilla


Just a few of the classic Chris*craft motorboats that were tooling around Lake Wawasee, Indiana on Sunday morning June 28, 2020. Each Sunday between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day weekend anywhere between 14 and 30 of these lovely watercraft … Continue reading

Posted in art, branding, classic vehicles, culture, entertainment, fun, historic preservation, history, placemaking, product design, recreation, technology, tourism, Transportation, Travel, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Roadside Americana: Atomic age stops, sights, and oddities


This blogpost is a little adventure through the sights and sounds of America’s roadside culture to depict how the Atomic Age has impacted it since 1945. A whole variety of businesses have adopted the term “atomic” or some variation thereof … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, advertising, archaeology, architecture, art, atomic age, branding, brewpubs, cities, coffee shops/cafes, Communications, consumerism, Cuisine, culture, economic development, entertainment, entrepreneurship, fun, geography, historic preservation, history, land use, Maps, marketing, military, place names, placemaking, Science, Science fiction, signs, technology, theaters, third places, toponymy, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

American “Atomgrads” of the Cold War era…and beyond


Back on May 6th and May 8th respectively, posts were published on the “Atomgrads” of the Soviet Union. One pertained to the nuclear weapon “Atomgrads,” while the other discussed nuclear energy ones. This post will list the four (4) known … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, atomic age, cities, deserts, economic development, environment, geography, government, health, Health care, historic preservation, history, land use, Maps, military, North America, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, Science, spatial design, technology, topography, tourism, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The rise of slender toothpick skyscrapers


A recent trend in skyscraper development, especially in New York City, has been pencil-thin, almost toothpick-like skyscrapers built on very small/narrow parcels. These slender towers look almost anorexic in appearance compared to many of their predecessors (see comparison graphic below).  … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, branding, cities, downtown, economic development, geography, historic preservation, history, Housing, infrastructure, land use, placemaking, planning, skylines, skyscrapers, spatial design, Statistics, technology, traffic, urban design, urban planning, walking, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shipwreck sightings in and near Michigan’s Manitou Passage


Living on the Great Lakes, particularly in the Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan provides some unique opportunities to see shipwrecks. Literally hundreds of them rest upon the lake floor in this region, particularly in places like Manitou Passage which separates … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, climate change, culture, environment, geography, Great Lakes, historic preservation, history, Maps, nature, pictures, place names, planning, shipwrecks, topography, tourism, transportation, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Atomic “doomtowns” contaminated by the Kyshtym Disaster


The two (2) most well-known peacetime atomic/nuclear disasters are Fukushima in 2011 and Chernobyl in 1986. However, what is considered the third most serious atomic/nuclear disaster? No, it is not Three Mile Island… The third most serious peacetime atomic/nuclear disaster in … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Asia, atomic age, cities, environment, Europe, geography, health, historic preservation, history, land use, Maps, nature, place names, politics, pollution, Russia, Science, sustainability, topography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Hydrograds” built by the former Soviet Union


  Following last week’s post on American Hydrograds, this blogpost explores the “Hydrograds“ built by the former Soviet Union. Hydrograds are cities and towns constructed specifically to house workers building the hydroelectric project, as well as the support staff to … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, cities, culture, energy, Europe, geography, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, rivers/watersheds, Russia, spatial design, technology, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Soviet-era “Atomgrads,” part 2 – Nuclear Energy Cities


http:// Part 2 of this series on Soviet-era “Atomgrads” focuses on those that were developed to build, service, and support nuclear power plants in the Soviet Union. Of the 12 cities listed and mapped, all but one remain active communities … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, architecture, Asia, atomic age, business, cities, culture, economic development, energy, environment, Europe, geography, government, health, historic preservation, history, Housing, infrastructure, land use, Maps, military, place names, placemaking, planning, pollution, Russia, Science, spatial design, Statistics, technology, toponymy, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Soviet-era “Atomgrads,” part 1 – Nuclear Weapon Cities


http:// During the Cold War, the Soviet Union developed a series of “Atomgrads“ or nuclear cities.   Nearly all of these cities were newly planned and designed to provide housing and community services for the future scientists and their families … Continue reading

Posted in Asia, atomic age, cities, culture, economic development, energy, environment, Europe, geography, government, health, historic preservation, history, Housing, infrastructure, Maps, military, place names, placemaking, planning, pollution, Russia, Science, Statistics, technology, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The world’s most resilient city is… Hiroshima


… a remarkable place that has not only turned its seemingly desperate circumstances completely around in the past 75 years, but its entire focus and purpose as a member of the world community. The timeline expressed above probably gives away … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, Asia, branding, cities, civics, commerce, culture, economic development, economic gardening, environment, geography, government, health, Health care, historic preservation, history, humanity, infrastructure, land use, Maps, military, new urbanism, peace, placemaking, planning, politics, pollution, psychology, revitalization, Science, spatial design, Statistics, sustainability, topography, tourism, traffic, transportation, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment