Category Archives: Labor

Driving and striving to survive a broken ‘Merica

I will never, ever look at a recreational vehicle, van, motor home, or campground the same way again. Not since reading Jessica Bruder’s engrossing, informative, and heartbreaking new book entitled Nomadland. I have long imagined, envied, and eagerly anticipated my … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, ageism, art, book reviews, books, Cars, civics, civility, consumerism, culture, demographics, economics, Economy, family, geography, health, Health care, history, homelessness, Housing, human rights, humanity, Labor, literature, logistics, minimalism, politics, poverty, product design, reading, shopping, social equity, Statistics, transportation, Travel, unemployment, Women, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“A Handmaid’s Tale” – Is fiction becoming reality?

Though written 32 years ago, the dystopian theocratic society described in Margaret Atwood’s striking novel bears an uncanny likeness to what is (and has been for some time) being preached and advocated by far-right political and religious zealots in our … Continue reading

Posted in art, book reviews, books, Canada, censorship, civics, civility, Communications, culture, feminism, futurism, human rights, humanity, Labor, literature, Love, Religion, Women, writing | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

America’s busiest container ports in 2014

Interesting data provided in the chart below. Despite a labor strike in 2014, Los Angeles and Long Beach continued to the lead the way as the busiest container ports in the United States based on twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs). the … Continue reading

Posted in cities, commerce, economic development, economics, Economy, geography, globalization, history, infrastructure, Labor, land use, logistics, planning, Railroads, rivers/watersheds, shipping, Statistics, transportation, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Equity is an economic growth engine!

Findings from the National Equity Atlas for ten (10) geographically dispersed mid-sized metropolitan regions are provided below. Check out the last column as it depicts how much more robust each of these regions would have been if there had been … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, ageism, business, cities, diversity, economic development, economic gardening, economics, Economy, fair trade, feminism, geography, government, history, humanity, inclusiveness, Labor, planning, poverty, social equity, Statistics, Women | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The DUMB reality of opting-out

In an ironic twist of fate, Southeast Michigan’s  regional bus system is nicknamed SMART (Southeast Michigan Regional Transit). Given the ability of communities in the region to opt-out of participation, the name certainly is an oxymoron to the DUMB (Detroit Unworkable Metro Bus) … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, Advocacy, Alternative transportation, bicycling, Bus transportation, Cars, cities, civics, civility, commerce, Communications, economic development, geography, government, health, history, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, infrastructure, Labor, land use, logistics, Maps, placemaking, planning, pollution, poverty, social equity, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, sustainability, traffic, transit, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

When land use planning turns EVIL

As professional planners, we like to think of land use planning as a fairly benign occupation that may stir controversy and discourse every now and then. I doubt many of us would consider the profession as being evil. But, as … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Asia, book reviews, books, China, cities, civility, Europe, geography, government, history, human rights, humanity, infrastructure, Labor, land use, Maps, military, North America, Oceania, peace, planning, South America, transportation, UK, urban planning, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

“Small, Gritty, and Green” just misses the mark

While quite an interesting read, the book Small, Gritty, and Green: The Promise of America’s Smaller Industrial Cities in a Low-Carbon World, by Catherine Tumber raised only a few new ideas to this urban planner. Perhaps that was because it … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, Alternative energy, art, book reviews, books, branding, cities, civics, climate change, colleges, commerce, culture, diversity, downtown, economic development, economic gardening, Economy, education, energy, entrepreneurship, environment, Food, geography, globalization, government, health, historic preservation, history, Housing, inclusiveness, infrastructure, Labor, land use, literature, marketing, new urbanism, North America, placemaking, planning, politics, pollution, poverty, psychology, recreation, Renewable Energy, revitalization, schools, Science, Small business, spatial design, sprawl, States, Statistics, sustainability, technology, third places, tourism, Trade, transit, transportation, Travel, unemployment, urban planning, weather, writing, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment