Category Archives: land use

Roadside Americana: Atomic age stops, sights, and oddities


This blogpost is a little adventure through the sights and sounds of America’s roadside culture to depict how the Atomic Age has impacted it since 1945. A whole variety of businesses have adopted the term “atomic” or some variation thereof … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, advertising, archaeology, architecture, art, atomic age, branding, brewpubs, cities, coffee shops/cafes, Communications, consumerism, Cuisine, culture, economic development, entertainment, entrepreneurship, fun, geography, historic preservation, history, land use, Maps, marketing, military, place names, placemaking, Science, Science fiction, signs, technology, theaters, third places, toponymy, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

American “Atomgrads” of the Cold War era…and beyond


Back on May 6th and May 8th respectively, posts were published on the “Atomgrads” of the Soviet Union. One pertained to the nuclear weapon “Atomgrads,” while the other discussed nuclear energy ones. This post will list the four (4) known … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, atomic age, cities, deserts, economic development, environment, geography, government, health, Health care, historic preservation, history, land use, Maps, military, North America, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, Science, spatial design, technology, topography, tourism, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The rise of slender toothpick skyscrapers


A recent trend in skyscraper development, especially in New York City, has been pencil-thin, almost toothpick-like skyscrapers built on very small/narrow parcels. These slender towers look almost anorexic in appearance compared to many of their predecessors (see comparison graphic below).  … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, branding, cities, downtown, economic development, geography, historic preservation, history, Housing, infrastructure, land use, placemaking, planning, skylines, skyscrapers, spatial design, Statistics, technology, traffic, urban design, urban planning, walking, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Atomic “doomtowns” contaminated by the Kyshtym Disaster


The two (2) most well-known peacetime atomic/nuclear disasters are Fukushima in 2011 and Chernobyl in 1986. However, what is considered the third most serious atomic/nuclear disaster? No, it is not Three Mile Island… The third most serious peacetime atomic/nuclear disaster in … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Asia, atomic age, cities, environment, Europe, geography, health, historic preservation, history, land use, Maps, nature, place names, politics, pollution, Russia, Science, sustainability, topography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Too close for comfort: Indiana’s brush with a nuclear nightmare


http:// As a child of the Atomic Age and the Cold War growing up on the far north side of Indianapolis, I never realized just how dangerously close my state came to suffering a major nuclear catastrophe a mere 55 … Continue reading

Posted in aerospace, airports, archaeology, atomic age, environment, geography, health, Health care, history, land use, Maps, military, pictures, pollution, Statistics, weather | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Hydrograds” built by the former Soviet Union


  Following last week’s post on American Hydrograds, this blogpost explores the “Hydrograds“ built by the former Soviet Union. Hydrograds are cities and towns constructed specifically to house workers building the hydroelectric project, as well as the support staff to … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, cities, culture, energy, Europe, geography, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, rivers/watersheds, Russia, spatial design, technology, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

American “Hydrograds” – Cities built for hydroelectric projects


  Two recent posts I’ve written on the Atomgrads (nuclear cities) of the former Soviet Union that were developed to both construct and support both nuclear weapons and energy plants led me to explore similar government built community for hydroelectric … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, architecture, cities, downtown, economic development, environment, geography, Geology, Health care, Housing, infrastructure, land use, Maps, nature, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, rivers/watersheds, spatial design, theaters, third places, topography, toponymy, tourism, transportation, Travel, urban design, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Favorite shoreline & inland hikes of NW Lower Michigan


The list below includes those trails that are primarily geared towards hikers rather than cyclists. The only exception is the Boardman Lake Loop Trail.  Shoreline hikes refer to those that are along Lake Michigan or Grand Traverse Bay. Meanwhile, inland … Continue reading

Posted in entertainment, environment, fitness, fun, geography, Geology, health, Health care, hiking, infrastructure, land use, Maps, nature, pictures, placemaking, planning, recreation, spatial design, topography, tourism, trails, Travel, walking, Wildlife | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Soviet-era “Atomgrads,” part 2 – Nuclear Energy Cities


http:// Part 2 of this series on Soviet-era “Atomgrads” focuses on those that were developed to build, service, and support nuclear power plants in the Soviet Union. Of the 12 cities listed and mapped, all but one remain active communities … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, architecture, Asia, atomic age, business, cities, culture, economic development, energy, environment, Europe, geography, government, health, historic preservation, history, Housing, infrastructure, land use, Maps, military, place names, placemaking, planning, pollution, Russia, Science, spatial design, Statistics, technology, toponymy, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The world’s most resilient city is… Hiroshima


… a remarkable place that has not only turned its seemingly desperate circumstances completely around in the past 75 years, but its entire focus and purpose as a member of the world community. The timeline expressed above probably gives away … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, Asia, branding, cities, civics, commerce, culture, economic development, economic gardening, environment, geography, government, health, Health care, historic preservation, history, humanity, infrastructure, land use, Maps, military, new urbanism, peace, placemaking, planning, politics, pollution, psychology, revitalization, Science, spatial design, Statistics, sustainability, topography, tourism, traffic, transportation, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment