Category Archives: racism

Geography of America’s Historic Black Main Streets

  Discriminatory Jim Crow Era segregation laws that were often brutally enforced throughout the South and the bigoted use of similar divisive tactics elsewhere in the United States led to the creation and development of African-American business districts and corridors … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, archaeology, architecture, business, cities, civics, Civil Rights, civility, commerce, culture, diversity, downtown, economic development, economic gardening, entertainment, entrepreneurship, gentrification, geography, historic preservation, history, Housing, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, injustice, land use, pictures, placemaking, planning, politics, poverty, racism, revitalization, shopping, Small business, social equity, tourism, Trade, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The worst failures of American urban planning

This post looks at macro-scale urban planning failures to identify what this retired planner believes are/were the worst blunders that have taken place in American urban planning, as a profession. Keep in mind that urban planning includes a lot of … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, architecture, Bus transportation, cities, civics, Civil Rights, commerce, culture, demographics, density, diversity, downtown, economic development, environment, geography, government, health, historic preservation, history, Housing, humanity, inclusiveness, infrastructure, injustice, land use, placemaking, planning, racism, rail, rivers/watersheds, social equity, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, Taxes, traffic, transit, transportation, urban design, urban planning, walking, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

American core cities that escaped freeway devastation

The following list identifies those core cities in the United States that have not been devastated by freeway construction (to date), and particularly during the interstate highway building-boom of the 1950s-1970s. While many of America’s “then largest” cities saw downtown … Continue reading

Posted in Cars, cities, culture, downtown, economic development, Economy, environment, geography, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, Maps, planning, poverty, racism, spatial design, sprawl, topography, tourism, Trade, traffic, transportation, Travel, urban design, urban planning | 7 Comments

Up to 690,000 American’s died from our own nuke tests!

Yes, you read the post title correctly. According to a 2017 study by researchers from the University of Arizona, between 340,000 and 690,000 Americans are estimated to have died from fallout and radiation-linked diseases generated by the 100 atmospheric atomic … Continue reading

Posted in atomic age, books, civics, education, environment, health, Health care, history, humanity, injustice, Maps, military, Mining, Native Americans, politics, pollution, poverty, racism, Science, Statistics, weather | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blackout Tuesday

Posted in Advocacy, civics, Civil Rights, civility, diversity, humanity, inclusiveness, Love, peace, racism | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Chronology & Geography of Civil Rights Wade-in Protests

Though not as well known or as common as the lunch counter sit-ins that protested segregated dining, beach wade-ins were another peaceful tactic used to demonstrate the rampant amount of bigotry and racism that existing during the Jim Crow era … Continue reading

Posted in cities, civics, Civil Rights, civility, geography, historic preservation, history, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, injustice, racism, social equity, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Chronology & Geography of Civil Rights Lunch Counter Sit-ins

Below is a chronological and geographical list of the start date(s) of known lunch counter sit-ins that took place to protest Jim Crow-style segregated seating and dining accommodations for African-Americans. While segregated lunch counter were most common in the South, … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, business, cities, civics, Civil Rights, civility, colleges, culture, downtown, economics, education, Food, geography, historic preservation, history, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, Maps, politics, racism, social equity, Statistics, third places | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Problems with Charter Townships

If you are not from Michigan you may have never heard of the term “charter township.” They are different from standard “general law” townships, in that: “Charter township status is a special township classification created by the Michigan Legislature in … Continue reading

Posted in cities, civics, commerce, demographics, diversity, economic development, geography, government, history, inclusiveness, infrastructure, land use, planning, racism, social equity, spatial design, sprawl, States, Statistics, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Thriving and Inclusive First-Ring/Inner Suburbs

As metropolitan areas grow in population or enlarge their land area by sprawl, gradually, the innermost or first-ring suburbs start to experience some of the same problems that the core city have found challenging. This is particularly true in regions … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, adaptive reuse, architecture, art, bicycling, cities, civics, colleges, commerce, culture, density, diversity, economic development, economic gardening, education, entertainment, entrepreneurship, fun, geography, government, health, historic preservation, history, Housing, human rights, inclusiveness, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, Passenger rail, placemaking, planning, racism, revitalization, Science, shopping, skylines, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, third places, tourism, traffic, transit, urban planning, walking, zoning | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Ten Planning Lessons from Traverse City

Now that we have lived in Traverse City for almost four years, it is time to list the ten top planning lessons learned from our hometown. Sometimes, evaluation of the places closest to you are the toughest. Smaller cities and … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, adaptive reuse, Advocacy, air travel, branding, cities, civics, civility, commerce, Communications, culture, demographics, diversity, downtown, economic development, education, entertainment, environment, family, gay rights, geography, government, health, historic preservation, history, homelessness, Housing, human rights, humanity, immigration, inclusiveness, infrastructure, land use, placemaking, planning, politics, poverty, racism, Sexism, social equity, spatial design, sustainability, third places, tourism, transportation, Travel, urban planning, volunteerism, Welcome | 6 Comments