Category Archives: Statistics

States with the most heliports and seaplane bases


The following data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics identifies those ten (10) states with the most public and private heliports and seaplane bases in the United States. A separate list is provided for each. One of the more surprising … Continue reading

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The UK’s loneliest commercial airports


http:// Many are familiar with crowded international airports in the United Kingdom like London Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted, City, and Luton; as well as Manchester, Glasgow, and Edinburgh. However, the following list identifies the ten (10) least busy (loneliest) commercial airports … Continue reading

Posted in air travel, airport planning, airports, aviation, cities, Europe, geography, planning, Statistics, tourism, transportation, Travel, U.K., UK | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Largest “pur” suffix cities of India and beyond


Continuing with our tabulation of city suffixes, the following list identifies the world’s largest cities containing the suffix of “pur” along with two variations, “pura” and “pore.” Pur and pura are suffixes meaning “city” or “settlement”, used in several place … Continue reading

Posted in Asia, cities, culture, geography, history, India, Language, Maps, place names, Statistics, toponymy, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s largest “burg,” “burgh,” or “bourg” suffix cities


  By far the longest and most geographically diverse list to date identifies cities and towns of 10,000 residents or more whose name contains the suffix of “burg,” “burgh,” or “bourg.” ┬áCities/towns for four (4) continents are represented – Europe, … Continue reading

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World’s largest “polis” suffix cities


          Below is a list of the largest cities in the world that incorporate a standard variation of the Greek term for a city-state “polis” as a suffix in their name*. Since some of these cities … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Asia, branding, cities, civics, culture, Europe, geography, North America, Oceania, place names, South America, Statistics, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Chronology & Geography of Civil Rights Lunch Counter Sit-ins


Below is a chronological and geographical list of the start date(s) of known lunch counter sit-ins that took place to protest Jim Crow-style segregated seating and dining accommodations for African-Americans. While segregated lunch counter were most common in the South, … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, business, cities, civics, Civil Rights, civility, colleges, culture, downtown, economics, education, Food, geography, historic preservation, history, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, Maps, politics, racism, social equity, Statistics, third places | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Problems with Charter Townships


If you are not from Michigan you may have never heard of the term “charter township.” They are different from standard “general law” townships, in that: “Charter township status is a special township classification created by the Michigan Legislature in … Continue reading

Posted in cities, civics, commerce, demographics, diversity, economic development, geography, government, history, inclusiveness, infrastructure, land use, planning, racism, social equity, spatial design, sprawl, States, Statistics, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thriving and Inclusive First-Ring/Inner Suburbs


As metropolitan areas grow in population or enlarge their land area by sprawl, gradually, the innermost or first-ring suburbs start to experience some of the same problems that the core city have found challenging. This is particularly true in regions … Continue reading

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Mapping America’s Dumping Grounds


At what point are we going to change our wasteful ways? At what point will we take recycling, repurposing, and reuse seriously? The two (2) maps provided should break every American’s heart. Sometimes, while driving our nation’s highways, I am … Continue reading

Posted in commerce, environment, geography, government, health, infrastructure, land use, Maps, planning, politics, pollution, recycling, Statistics, Trade, urban planning, visual pollution | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Smaller Cities with Taller Skylines


  None of these cities currently exceed 100,000 in population, but they each have a surprising number of tall buildings dotting their downtown area skyline. This post is dedicated to these smaller cities who are reaching for the stars…so to … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, cities, downtown, economic development, fun, geography, land use, new urbanism, placemaking, planning, skylines, skyscrapers, Statistics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment