Category Archives: Statistics

Canada’s Fastest Growing Province/Territory is…


No, it is not Pacific sunset British Columbia or energy-rich Alberta. Nor is it Toronto-infused Ontario. As a percentage, the fastest growing province/territory in Canada is the far-north Inuit territory of Nunavut which lodged an impressive a 12.7% increase in … Continue reading

Posted in Canada, cities, civics, demographics, geography, health, Health care, history, Housing, Language, Maps, planning, Statistics, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Tallest Suburban Skyscrapers of the Midwest


Criteria for inclusion in this list: Minimum building height of 200 feet. Must be located outside the city limits of the core city(ies) of the metro area – suburban towers within the main city’s limits are not included. Must be … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, cities, downtown, economic development, geography, history, Housing, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, planning, skylines, skyscrapers, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Geography of Target’s Smaller/Flexible Urban Store Format


While visiting Chicago earlier this month, one could hardly miss seeing the influx of major retailers into urban areas. Particularly noticeable was Target with its trending urban and collegiate smaller/flexible format stores popping up over much of the city and … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, adaptive reuse, architecture, bicycling, Biking, business, cities, commerce, downtown, economic development, gentrification, geography, historic preservation, infrastructure, land use, logistics, Maps, new urbanism, Passenger rail, placemaking, planning, rail, revitalization, shopping, spatial design, Statistics, Trade, transit, transportation, urban planning, walking, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Front Grills That Can Kill


A sadly growing trend in American transportation has been an increase in pedestrian and bicyclist deaths. There are several reasons for this, but one that is not mentioned as often as it should be is the increased size and altered … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, Advocacy, Alternative transportation, bicycling, Biking, cities, civics, consumerism, deregulation, government, health, Health care, hiking, history, human rights, humanity, planning, politics, recreation, Statistics, transportation, walking | Tagged | Leave a comment

Playing “Boggle” With City Names Inside City Names


Taking a page from Peggy Hill’s championship playbook for the classic word game “Boggle,” the following list identifies those cities or towns whose name contains the names of other cities and towns. A minimum of three (3) other city or … Continue reading

Posted in cities, civics, Communications, fun, geography, Language, place names, placemaking, Statistics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Carved Cedar Skylines of the Pacific Northwest Coast


For centuries, coastlines, coves, river shorelines, and inlets from Alaska southward to Washington State were dotted with the sky-scraping carved cedar totem poles that depicted the history and legacies of those First Nation and Native American residents who called this … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, art, Canada, cities, Communications, culture, geography, historic preservation, history, humanity, inclusiveness, infrastructure, land use, nature, North America, pictures, place names, planning, rivers/watersheds, skylines, skyscrapers, Statistics, topography, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

A Sad Place Where Mass Incarceration Thrives


While there are many famous prisons and penitentiaries in the United States including Leavenworth in Kansas, Sing-Sing in New York State, Alcatraz in California, and Huntsville in Texas, there is one county that contains so many prisons, it can rightfully … Continue reading

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“Just Mercy” Will Rip Your Heart to Shreds


In all my years, I have never read a more disturbing, yet compelling book. The injustice and inhumanity described in Just Mercy will literally rip your heart to shreds and bring tears to your eyes. Just Mercy must be made … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, art, book reviews, books, charities, civics, Civil Rights, civility, culture, diversity, history, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, injustice, literature, politics, poverty, reading, social equity, Statistics, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Great ‘Reverse’ Migration May Be Disastrous for Many Northern Cities and States


Between 1916 and 1970, more than six million African-Americans migrated northward to work in factories and live in cities across the Northeast and Midwest. Today, there is mounting evidence that this great migration has reversed itself, as those who can … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, cities, civics, Civil Rights, civility, culture, demographics, economic development, economic gardening, Economy, education, entrepreneurship, family, geography, government, history, Housing, humanity, immigration, inclusiveness, planning, politics, poverty, social equity, Statistics, urban planning | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Ten Planning Lessons From Warsaw, Indiana


Warsaw, Indiana may not be the first place on most folks lists of planning trend setters across the nation, but in most any community one can find both good and bad lessons to learn from. This prosperous city along with … Continue reading

Posted in bicycling, bike sharing, business, Cars, cities, commerce, Communications, demographics, downtown, economic development, environment, geography, Health care, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, landscape architecture, placemaking, planning, revitalization, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, technology, tourism, traffic, transportation, urban planning, walking, zoning | Leave a comment