Category Archives: tourism

American “Hydrograds” – Cities built for hydroelectric projects


  Two recent posts I’ve written on the Atomgrads (nuclear cities) of the former Soviet Union that were developed to both construct and support both nuclear weapons and energy plants led me to explore similar government built community for hydroelectric … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, architecture, cities, downtown, economic development, environment, geography, Geology, Health care, Housing, infrastructure, land use, Maps, nature, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, rivers/watersheds, spatial design, theaters, third places, topography, toponymy, tourism, transportation, Travel, urban design, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Favorite shoreline & inland hikes of NW Lower Michigan


The list below includes those trails that are primarily geared towards hikers rather than cyclists. The only exception is the Boardman Lake Loop Trail. ¬†Shoreline hikes refer to those that are along Lake Michigan or Grand Traverse Bay. Meanwhile, inland … Continue reading

Posted in entertainment, environment, fitness, fun, geography, Geology, health, Health care, hiking, infrastructure, land use, Maps, nature, pictures, placemaking, planning, recreation, spatial design, topography, tourism, trails, Travel, walking, Wildlife | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fictional cities and towns of live action television


  The following list identifies the fictional city or town where these live action television series (comedy or drama) were situated. A separate blog post identifies fictional cities and towns of cartoon (or animated) series. States/provinces that have the most … Continue reading

Posted in advertising, art, branding, Canada, cities, entertainment, fun, geography, history, place names, placemaking, recreation, States, Television, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

The world’s most resilient city is… Hiroshima


… a remarkable place that has not only turned its seemingly desperate circumstances completely around in the past 75 years, but its entire focus and purpose as a member of the world community. The timeline expressed above probably gives away … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, Asia, branding, cities, civics, commerce, culture, economic development, economic gardening, environment, geography, government, health, Health care, historic preservation, history, humanity, infrastructure, land use, Maps, military, new urbanism, peace, placemaking, planning, politics, pollution, psychology, revitalization, Science, spatial design, Statistics, sustainability, topography, tourism, traffic, transportation, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Working list – World’s longest ‘urban’ escalators


Below is a working list of the longest urban escalators in the world. This list does not include the sum total length of multi-escalator systems (such as the Central-Mid Levels Escalator/Walkway System in Hong Kong), but only individual escalators or … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, adaptive reuse, airport planning, airports, architecture, bicycling, Biking, cities, downtown, economic development, geography, history, infrastructure, land use, planning, skyscrapers, spatial design, Statistics, third places, topography, tourism, transit, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Queen City” nicknames dotting the map


  Apparently being a queen city was big deal at one time in history given the number of cities that have used that moniker in some manner or another during their history. The list does not include cities with the … Continue reading

Posted in advertising, branding, Canada, cities, civics, Communications, culture, economic development, economic gardening, fun, geography, historic preservation, history, Maps, marketing, Mexico, North America, place names, placemaking, tourism, Travel, Welcome | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s longest inclined ‘urban’ transport elevator routes


An inclined elevator is an elevator that generally operates on a diagonal slope (or inclination) versus moving vertically straight up and down. **While inclined elevators are very similar to funiculars, they differ in the fact that an inclined elevator uses … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, architecture, cities, commerce, density, downtown, fun, geography, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, logistics, placemaking, planning, skylines, spatial design, Statistics, sustainability, topography, tourism, traffic, transit, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s tallest vertical ‘urban’ transport elevators


CORRECTION (4/6/2020): After posting this article it became apparent that it should have been limited to above ground elevators, as there are a number of underground ones in transit stations around the world. As a result, the underground elevators that … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, Alternative transportation, architecture, bicycling, Biking, cities, commerce, fun, futurism, geography, hiking, historic preservation, history, infrastructure, land use, logistics, placemaking, planning, skylines, spatial design, Statistics, topography, tourism, traffic, transit, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dublin Link Bridge – An iconic new non-motorized bridge


Opened appropriately on St. Patrick’s Day, the Dublin Link Bridge is the world’s longest “S” shape suspension bridge. Oh, and by the way, did I mention it’s in Dublin, Ohio, not Dublin, Ireland? With a 500 foot main span, an … Continue reading

Posted in Active transportation, bicycling, bike sharing, Biking, bridges, cities, downtown, economic development, hiking, land use, placemaking, planning, recreation, sustainability, tourism, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Ten Planning Lessons from Phoenix


Prior to 2019, the last time I had been in Phoenix was 1970. While I certainly expected the city to have changed in those nearly 50 years, I was unprepared for the largely unchecked growth and monumental differences that had … Continue reading

Posted in air travel, airport planning, airports, Cars, cities, climate change, commerce, deserts, downtown, economic development, geography, health, history, humanity, infrastructure, land use, nature, placemaking, planning, pollution, skylines, spatial design, sprawl, tourism, transit, transportation, Travel, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment