Holiday Snowshoe Trek


We, and quite a few other folks, spent part of Christmas Day snowshoeing Empire Bluff in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. Here are a few of the inspiring images from our trek.

Posted in entertainment, Environment, family, fitness, fun, geography, hiking, recreation, topography, trails, Travel | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Favorites of 2018


Films Released and Seen in 2018

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Favorite Drama Green Book

Favorite Musical or ComedyMary Poppins Returns

Source: ew.com

Favorite AnimatedIsle of Dogs

  • A Star is Born
  • Hearts Beat Loud
  • Black Panther
  • Bohemian Rhapsody
  • Roma
  • First Man
  • Incredibles 2
  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Inventing Tomorrow – documentary
  • Won’t You Be My Neighbor? – documentary
  • Fahrenheit 11/9 – documentary

Source: amazon.com

Classic Films First Seen in 2018

  1. The Big Heat (1953)
  2. Birdman of Alcatraz (1962)
  3. Suddenly, Last Summer (1959)
  4. Anatomy of a Murder (1959)
  5. Born Yesterday (1950)
  6. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  7. Kansas City Confidential (1952)
  8. Sunset Boulevard (1950)
  9. His Girl Friday (1940)
  10. M (1931)
  11. Passage to Marseille (1944)
  12. Something of Value (1957)
  13. The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)
  14. The Odd Couple (1968)

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Recent Films First Seen in 2018

  1. Milk (2008)
  2. Martian Child (2007)
  3. Children of Men (2006)
  4. Definitely, Maybe (2008)
  5. Nowhere Boy (2009)
  6. I, Tonya (2017)
  7. The Pianist (2002)
  8. Unbroken (2014)
  9. Coco (2017)
  10. No Reservations (2007)
  11. Wonder Woman (2017)
  12. Larry Crown (2011)
  13. Frankenweenie (2012)
  14. The Leisure Seeker (2017)
  15. In Search of Fellini (2017)
  16. Defiance (2008)
  17. 9 (2009)
  18. The Founder (2016)
  19. The Post (2017)
  20. The Florida Project (2017)
  21. The Big Lebowski (1998)
  22. Downsizing (2017)
  23. Fury (2014)

TV Drama

  1. The Crown (Netflix)

Source: amazon.com

TV Comedy

  1. Superstore (NBC)
  2. AP Bio (NBC)
  3. The Goldbergs (ABC)
  4. The Kids Are Alright (ABC)

Previous TV Shows Not Seen Before

1. Mad Men (AMC)

Books Published in 2018 (fiction)

  1. A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo
  2. American Exodus

Source: goodreads.com

Books Published in 2018 (non-fiction)

  1. Educated: A Memoir
  2. Don’t Make Me Pull Over

Previously Published Books First Read in 2018 (fiction)

  1. All the Names (2001)
  2. Artemis (2017)
  3. Another Roadside Attraction (1990)
  4. The Power (2017)
  5. Exodus (2013)
  6. The Alchemist (1993)
  7. The Elephant’s Journey (2010)
  8. Blindness (1995)

Previously Published Books First Read in 2018 (non-fiction)

  1. Without You There is No Us: My Time with the Sons of North Korea’s Elite (2014)
  2. Just Mercy (2014)
  3. Tibetan Peach Pie (2014)
  4. Fourteen (2015)
  5. The Penguin Lessons (2015)
  6. Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea (2010)
  7. Atlas Obscura (2016)
  8. Petty: The Biography (2015)
  9. Mediterranean Crossroads (2011)
  10. This Gulf of Fire (2015)
  11. Raven Rock (2017)
  12. West with the Night (1983)
  13. Dark Age Ahead (2005)

Source: amazon.com

New Album Released in 2018

  1. AAARTH – The Joy Formidable
  2. Art of Doubt – Metric
  3. Hearts Beat Loud soundtrack
  4. A Star Is Born soundtrack

Song/Track Released in 2018

  1. “The Better Me” acoustic version – The Joy Formidable
  2. “Keep a Little Soul” – Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
  3. “Hearts Beat Loud” – soundtrack of the same title
  4. “Shallow” – A Star is Born soundtrack
  5. “Now or Never Now” – Metric
  6. “Holding Out” – Metric
  7. “Underline the Black” – Metric
  8. “The Better Me” album version – The Joy Formidable
  9. “Dressed to Suppress” – Metric
  10. “Absence” – The Joy Formidable
  11. “All in All” – The Joy Formidable
  12. “What For” – The Joy Formidable
  13. “Four Out of Five” – Arctic Monkeys
  14. “Gold Rush” – Death Cab for Cutie
  15. “You Can’t Give Me” – The Joy Formidable
  16. “Dark Saturday” – Metric
  17. “The Wrong Side” – The Joy Formidable
  18. “Hedonism” – The Little Graves

Best Musicians Discovered in 2018

  1. Sparklehorse
  2. Joywave
  3. July Talk
  4. The Little Graves

Best Cover Song Discovered in 2018

1. “Gold Day” by The Joy Formidable

2. “Wish You We’re Here” by Sparklehorse and Radiohead

3. “Galveston” by Sparklehorse

Posted in book reviews, books, entertainment, film, fun, literature, movies, music, music reviews, Television | Leave a comment

The Descriptive Detail of Inuit Town Names


Inukshuk overlooking Kangiqtiniq (Rankin Inlet), Nunavut – Source: canadaalive.wordpress.com

As Inuit town names are being reestablished in the Arctic regions of Canada, Alaska, and Greenland, this author has found them to often be much more interesting and descriptive than the former English or Danish (in Greenland) names.

Sermersooq, Greenland – Source: farm9.staticflickr.com

Too often, in North America we have a tendency to name places after people, places, or events that have nothing to do with the geographical location. Native Americans and First Nations’ people on the other hand name places based on the physical or environmental attributes of the location.  This list below from across the Arctic region shows many examples.

Arctic Circle Cairn in Naujaat (Repulse Bay), Nunavut – Source: repulsebay.ca

The most surprising attribute that does not appear to be included, relates to the northern lights. Meanwhile, there are a few that are less than the most inviting town names. Personal favorites are highlighted in bold. As the Winter Solstice quickly approaches, enjoy these descriptive, and often beautiful Inuit town names. Peace.

Aasiaat, Greenland = spiders

Aklavik, NWT = barren ground/grizzly place

Akulivik, QC = central prong of a fishing spear

Alluitsup Paa, Greenland = outside of Alluitsoq (a former nearby town)

Anaktuvuk Pass, AK = place of caribou droppings

Arviat, NU = Bowhead whale

Atqasuk, AK = place to dig the rock that burns (coal)

Aupaluk, QC = where the Earth is red

Aujuittuq, NU = place that never thaws

Inukjuak, QC = the giant

Ilulissat, Greenland = icebergs

Inuvik, NWT = place of man

Inujivik, QC = place where ice accumulates from strong currents

Igluligaarjuk, NU = place with a few igloos

Iglulik, NU = place of igloos

Iqaluit, NU = place of fish

Iqaluktuuttiaq, NU = good place with lots of fish

Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland = big house dwellers

Kangiqtiniq, NU = deep bay or inlet

Kangiqsujuaq, QC = very large bay

Kangerlussuaq, Greenland = big fjord

Kangirsuk, QC = the bay

Kangiqtugaapik, NU = nice little inlet

Katovik, AK = seining (type of fishing) place

Kimmirut, NU = looks like a heel (reference to a rocky outcropping located in the inlet)

Kinngait, NU = high mountain

Kugaaruk, NU = little stream

Kugluktuk, NU = place of moving water

Kullorsuaq, Greenland = big thumb (for a thumb-shaped pinnacle nearby)

Kulusuk, Greenland = place of the Black Guillemot (a bird)

Kuujjuag, QC = great river

Kuujjuarapik, QC = little great river

Mittimatalik, NU = place where Mittima is buried

Naajuat, NU = nesting place for seagulls

Nanisivik, NU = place where people find things

Nanortalik, Greenland = place of polar bears

Narsaq, Greenland = plain

Nuuk, Greenland = cape

Paamiut, Greenland = people who reside by the mouth of the fjord

Pangnirtung, NU = place of the bull caribou

Paulatuk, NWT = place of coal

Puvirnituq, QC = place where there is the smell of rotting meat

Qamani’tuaq, NU = big lake joined by a river at both ends

Qausuittuq, NU = place with no dawn

Qikiqtarjuaq, NU = big island

Quaqtaq, QC = tapeworm

Salliq, NU = a large flat island in front of the mainland

Salluit, QC = the thin ones

Sanirajak, NU = one that is along the coast

Sermersooq, Greenland = beautiful glacier fjord

Sisimiut, Greenland = the people at the fox burrows

Taloyoak, NU = large bull caribou blind

Tasiujaq, QC = which resembles a lake

Tasiusaq, Greenland = looks like a lake

Tikirarjuaq, NU = long point

Tsiigehtchic, NWT = mouth of the iron river

Tuktoyaktuk, NWT = looks like a caribou

Ulukhaktok, NWT = where there is material for Ulus (an Inuit knife)

Umingmaktok, NU = he/she caught a muskox

Uqsuqtuuq, NU = place of plenty of blubber

Umiujak, QC = resembles a boat

Utqiagvik, AK = place for gathering wild roots

  • AK – Alaska
  • NU – Nunavut
  • NWT – Northwest Territories
  • QC – Quebec

SOURCES:

Posted in Arctic, Canada, cities, civics, culture, diversity, environment, Europe, geography, land use, Language, North America, place names, placemaking, planning, topography, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Canada’s Fastest Growing Province/Territory is…


No, it is not Pacific sunset British Columbia or energy-rich Alberta. Nor is it Toronto-infused Ontario. As a percentage, the fastest growing province/territory in Canada is the far-north Inuit territory of Nunavut which lodged an impressive a 12.7% increase in population in the five years between the 2011 and 2016 censuses.

Source: en.wikipedia.org

This data defies those who believe that growing places tend to be limited to those with temperate climates. In Nunavut’s case, the growth is mostly a matter of its high fertility rate – much higher than the rest of Canada.

Fertility Rate Comparison

  • Nunavut = 2.9 children
  • Canada average = 1.6 children

A review of communities across the territory shows the population growth is evenly spread out and not concentrated in a particular part of Nunavut. This factor and the number of similarly populated communities show a well-dispersed population base versus the Yukon and Northwest Territories where both have the vast majority of their populations concentrated around the territorial capital. In the Yukon, 70 percent of the population lives in Whitehorse, while in the NWT, 46 percent of the population lives in Yellowknife. By comparison, only 22 percent of Nunavut’s 2016 population resides in its capital of Iqaluit.

As can be seen from the table below, Nunavut has 14 communities with a population exceeding 1,000 residents. This compares to only two (2) in Yukon and six (6) in the Northwest Territories.

NUNAVUT TOWNS EXCEEDING 1,000 POPULATION IN 2016
TOWN* 2001 2006 2011 2016 Avg#/Yr
Arviat                  (fmr. Eskimo Point)
1899
2060
2318
2657
50.5
Baker Lake (Quamani’tuag)
1507
1728
1872
2069
37.5
Cambridge Bay (Iqaluktuttiaq)
1309
1477
1608
1766
30.5
Cape Dorset (Kinngait)
1148
1236
1363
1441
19.5
Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik)
785
820
934
1053
17.9
Gjoa Haven (Uqsuqtuuq)
960
1064
1279
1324
24.3
Iglulik
1286
1538
1454
1744
30.5
Iqaluit                 (fmr. Frobisher Bay)
5236
6184
6699
7740
166.9
Kugluktuk         (frmr. Coppermine)
1212
1320
1450
1491
18.6
Naujaat               (fmr. Repulse Bay)
612
748
945
1082
31.3
Pangnirtung
1276
1325
1425
1481
13.7
Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik)
1220
1315
1549
1617
26.5
Rankin Inlet (Kangiqiniq)
2177
2358
2266
2842
44.3
Taloyoak             (fmr. Spence Bay)
648
720
899
1029
25.4
* In some cases,it is unclear whether the town name has been formerly changed to its Inuit name, so both are provided. 
SOURCES:
en.wikipedia.org
Posted in Canada, cities, civics, demographics, geography, health, Health care, history, Housing, Language, Maps, planning, Statistics, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Tallest Suburban Skyscrapers of the Midwest


Criteria for inclusion in this list:

  • Minimum building height of 200 feet.
  • Must be located outside the city limits of the core city(ies) of the metro area – suburban towers within the main city’s limits are not included.
  • Must be located in Illinois (not including the St. Louis suburbs), Indiana (not including the Louisville suburbs), Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio (including Cincinnati suburbs in KY), South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The St. Louis suburbs of Illinois will be included with the South Central states, while the Louisville suburbs of Indiana will be included in the Southeast states.
  • Buildings will not be added until they are actually under construction or completed due to previously cancelled proposed projects.

Please feel free to forward/suggest any additions or corrections to the list.

Also provided after the main list are separate lists based on the decade of completion and by state and suburb.

RANK/SKYSCRAPER/SUBURB/HEIGHT/FLOORS/YEAR

  1. Oakbrook Terrace Tower: Oakbrook Terrace, IL = 418 ft (31) 1986
  2. 3000 Town Center: Southfield, MI = 402 ft (32) 1975
  3. Two Pierce Place: Itasca, IL = 395 ft (26) 1991
  4. 1000 Town Center: Southfield, MI = 395 ft (28) 1989
  5. 8500 Tower: Bloomington, MN = 381 ft (24) 1988
  6. 2000 Town: Center Southfield, MI = 371 ft (28) 1986
  7. Perry/Peace Memorial: Put-in-Bay, OH = 352 ft (–) 1915
  8. PNC Center: Troy, MI = 346 ft (25) 1975
  9. American Center: Southfield, MI = 331 ft (25) 1975
  10. 5000 Town Center: Southfield, MI = 328 ft (33) 1983
  11. Lake Park Tower: East Cleveland, OH = 327 ft (27) 1970
  12. RiverCenter I: Covington, KY * = 308 ft (19) 1990
  13. Wells Fargo Tower: Bloomington, MN = 300 ft (24) 1974
  14. Tower Plaza: Ann Arbor, MI = 293 ft (26) 1969
  15. The Ascent: Covington, KY* = 293 ft (21) 2007
  16. RiverCenter II: Covington, KY* = 292 ft (17) 1998
  17. Blue Chip Casino: Michigan City, IN = 280 ft (23) 2009
  18. Chase Building: Evanston, IL = 277 ft (22) 1969
  19. Sherman Plaza: Evanston, IL = 276 ft (25) 2007
  20. 4000 Town Center: Southfield, MI = 270 ft (20) 1979
  21. Zurich Towers 1: Schaumburg, IL = 270 ft (20) 1988
  22. Zurich Towers 2: Schaumburg, IL = 270 ft (20) 1990
  23. Summit Chase Condos: Grandview Hts, OH = 268 ft (22) 1966
  24. Esplanade I: Downers Grove, IL = 266 ft (19) 1990
  25. Crystal Tower: East Cleveland, OH = 266 ft (24) 1968
  26. Optima Views: Evanston, IL = 265 ft (28) 2003
  27. Winton Place Apts: Lakewood, OH = 264 ft (28) 1963
  28. 601 Carlson Parkway: Minnetonka, MN = 263 ft (16) 1989
  29. 701 Carlson Parkway: Minnetonka, MN = 263 ft (16) 1989
  30. Woodfield Corp. Center: Schaumburg, IL = 263 ft (21) 1986
  31. Shore Club Apts: St. Clair Shores, MI = 260 ft (27) 1970s
  32. Travelers Tower I: Southfield, MI = 256 ft (18) 1971
  33. Vantage Oak Park: Oak Park, IL = 256 ft (21) 2016
  34. One Towne Square: Southfield, MI = 253 ft (21) 1992
  35. Cincinnati International Airport Control Tower: Hebron, KY = 252 ft (–) 1998
  36. Detroit Metro Airport Control Tower: Romulus, MI = 250 ft (–) 2002
  37. Chrysler Building: Auburn Hills, MI = 249 ft (15) 1996
  38. The Emerson South: Oak Park, IL = 244 ft (20) 2017
  39. One Wheaton Centre: Wheaton, IL = 244 ft (20) 1975
  40. Two Wheaton Centre: Wheaton, IL = 244 ft (20) 1975
  41. Fox Island Place: Aurora, IL = 243 ft (22) 1928
  42. Metropoint Tower: St. Louis Park, MN = 240 ft (20) 1975
  43. Optum Building 1: Eden Prairie, MN = 238 ft (15) 2015\
  44. SouthShore Tower 1: Newport, KY = 238 ft (21) 2008
  45. One Rotary Center: Evanston, IL = 237 ft (18) 1977
  46. Park Evanston: Evanston, IL = 236 ft (24) 1997
  47. Westin Hotel: Edina, MN = 236 ft (18) 2008
  48. 8400 Tower: Bloomington, MN = 235 ft (17) 1988
  49. Doubletree Hotel: Bloomington, MN = 234 ft (21) 1974
  50. Mills Park Tower: Oak Park, IL = 232 ft (19) 1975
  51. Westbury Apts: North Olmsted, OH = 232 ft (19) 1966
  52. The Sapphire Tower I: Southfield, MI = 230 ft (18) 1967
  53. The Sapphire Tower II: Southfield, MI = 230 ft (18) 1967
  54. Madison Place: Covington, KY* = 228 ft (18) 2001
  55. Radisson Hotel: Covington, KY* = 228 ft (18) 1972
  56. One Pierce Place: Itasca, IL = 223 ft (17) 1985
  57. Westin Hotel: Lombard, IL = 223 ft (18) 2007
  58. Grand Traverse Resort: Acme Township, MI = 220 ft (19) 1986
  59. Macomb County Building: Mount Clemens, MI = 219 ft (13) 1944
  60. Minnesota Center: Bloomington, MN = 214 ft (16) 1987
  61. Edward Hotel: Dearborn, MI = 213 ft (15) 1976
  62. Northland Plaza: Bloomington, MN = 213 ft (15) 1985
  63. Burton Memorial Tower: Ann Arbor, MI = 212 ft (10) 1936
  64. Fujitec Tower: Lebanon, OH = 210 ft (17) 1993
  65. One Lincoln Centre: Oakbrook Terrace, IL = 209 ft (17) 1986
  66. The Centennial Troy, MI = 207 ft (15) 1983
  67. Holmes Student Center: DeKalb, IL = 207 ft (17) 1962
  68. Spinning Wheel Apts: Hinsdale, IL = 207 ft (17) 1969
  69. University Towers: Ann Arbor, MI = 205 ft (19) 1960
  70. Golden Tower: Covington, KY* = 203 ft (16) 1972
  71. 8170 33rd Ave. South: Bloomington, MN = 202 ft (14) 1972
  72. Southfield Centre: Southfield, MI = 201 ft (14) 1976
  73. Southgate Tower: Southgate, MI = 200 ft (13) 1973

*Covington, KY and Newport, KY are suburbs of Cincinnati, OH

SOURCES:
https://www.emporis.com/
https://skyscraperpage.com/

Skyscrapers by Decade Completed

  • 2010s = 3
  • 2000s = 10
  • 1990s = 9
  • 1980s = 16
  • 1970s = 20
  • 1960s = 11
  • Pre-1960 = 4

Suburb Skyscrapers by State

  • Illinois = 23
  • Michigan = 23
  • Minnesota = 11
  • Northern Kentucky (Cincinnati area) = 8
  • Ohio = 7
  • Indiana = 1

Midwest Suburban Cities with the Most Skyscrapers

  • Southfield, MI = 11
  • Bloomington, MN = 7
  • Evanston, IL = 5
  • Ann Arbor, MI = 3
  • Oak Park, IL = 3
  • Schaumburg, IL = 3
Posted in architecture, cities, downtown, economic development, geography, history, Housing, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, planning, skylines, skyscrapers, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Geography of Target’s Smaller/Flexible Urban Store Format


Chicago-Oak Park Target

While visiting Chicago earlier this month, one could hardly miss seeing the influx of major retailers into urban areas. Particularly noticeable was Target with its trending urban and collegiate smaller/flexible format stores popping up over much of the city and its inner ring of suburbs. Locations were seen in Skokie by the Dempster CTA Station, downtown Oak Park, Lakeview, and near the Belmont CTA Station.

Approaching the Target at the Skokie/Dempster Yellow Line CTA Station

To explore this growing (and needed) retail market foray, panethos.wordpress.com has put together a list of known and planned smaller/flexible format Target stores located across the country. For those of use who love urban living and prefer walking, biking, or transit to the car for their day-to-day needs, this trend is a very welcome addition to the retail marketplace. I was particularly enamored with the siting of some of these new stores at or near CTA train stops – Skokie/Dempster, Chicago/Belmont, and Chicago/Hyde Park are three (3) excellent examples.

Target is relation to Belmont CTA Station – Source: http://redlineproject.org/ctachanging2.php

A few of the smaller/flexible format Targets are being located in suburban shopping centers. Those strip commercial locations are not included in the list provided below, as this blogpost is about major retail’s move to more urbanized and collegiate city sites. It is this urban planner’s hope is that the vast majority of these new Target stores will continue to be located in downtown, midtown, uptown, college, and other urban retail settings where they are far more accessible to pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit riders. Furthermore, by being situated along transit corridors, these stores are more user-friendly to the poor and less-mobile than often hard-to-reach far-flung suburban sites.

Chicago/Lincoln Park Target, where it replaced a Best Buy in 2015 – Source: dnainfo.com

It is also hoped that Target’s smaller/flexible store format will be considered for openings in mid-sized cities, smaller urban areas, and distressed communities, preferably in a downtown/midtown location where the store can help reignite life into the shopping district. Some may argue this influx into smaller markets could be detrimental to local retailers. I believe the added foot traffic generated by the presence of a smaller/flexible format major retailer like Target can be helpful to all, as the economies of agglomeration from competing customer options in a downtown/midtown/uptown setting is a far-preferable alternative to the inefficient, car dominated, edge-city style of sprawl that is a relic of the 20th Century.

Essentially, Target (and other retailers) are attempting to revive the golden age of urban retail when chains like Sears, J.C. Penney, Montgomery Ward, Kresge, McCrory, Kress, and hometown stores opened and operated successful central city locations prior to the advent of the suburban shopping center/mall.

Right on, Target! Let’s hope your efforts are successful. Thank you, for emphasizing this retail trend away from suburban sprawl and towards reinvigorating our dynamic and diverse urban shopping districts.

City/State/Location/Year Opened/Square Footage

  • Austin, TX – University of Texas (2017) = 22,000 sq.ft.
  • Boston, MA – Brookline/Boston University (2016) = 16,100
  • Boston, MA – Cambridge/Harvard/MIT (2017)
  • Boston, MA – Porter Square (2018) = 28,000
  • Brooklyn, NY – Bensonhurst = 20,400
  • Brooklyn, NY – Downtown/Fulton Street = 125,000
  • Brooklyn, NY – Kings Highway (2020) = 50,000
  • Brooklyn, MY – Midwood (2018) = 37,700
  • Chapel Hill, NC – UNC (2017)
  • Chicago, IL – Belmont Station (2016) = 29,000
  • Chicago, IL – Evanston/Northwestern University (2018) = 27,400
  • Chicago, IL – Hyde Park/University of Chicago (2016) = 21,600
  • Chicago, IL – Lakeview/Ashland (2017) = 31,000
  • Chicago, IL – Lincoln Park North (2016) = 33,000
  • Chicago, IL – Logan Square (2020) = 27,400
  • Chicago, IL – Oak Park (2017) = 22,000
  • Chicago, IL – Rogers Park (2019) = 23,000
  • Chicago, IL – Skokie (2017) = 33,000
  • Chicago, IL – South Loop
  • Chicago, IL – Streeterville (2015) = 24,000
  • Chicago, IL – State Street
  • Chicago, IL – Wicker Park (2018) = 12,800
  • Cincinnati, OH – University of Cincinnati (2017) = 17,700
  • Columbus, OH – High Street/OSU (2018) = 28,000
  • Denver, CO – Downtown (2018) = 28,000
  • East Lansing, MI – Grand River Avenue/MSU (2019) = 22,000
  • Gainesville, FL – University of Florida
  • Irvine, CA – UC Irvine = 20,000
  • Las Vegas, NV – Showcase (2020) = 20,000
  • Lexington, KY – The Hub at UK (2019) = 21,000
  • Los Angeles, CA – Koreatown (2018) = 22,000
  • Los Angeles, CA – USC (2017) = 25,000
  • Miami Beach, FL – The BLVD (2019) = 32,900
  • Minneapolis, MN – Dinkytown/U of MN (2014) = 20,000
  • Minneapolis, MN – Downtown
  • Minneapolis, MN – Uptown (2017) = 21,400
  • New York City (Manhattan), NY – Columbus Circle = 34,000
  • New York City (Manhattan), NY – East Village = 27,000
  • New York City (Manhattan), NY – Hell’s Kitchen (2020) = 29,000
  • New York City (Manhattan), NY – Kips Bay (2019) = 21,000
  • New York City (Manhattan), NY – Lower East Side = 22,500
  • New York City (Manhattan), NY – Tribeca/NYU (2016) = 45,000
  • New York City (Manhattan), NY – Upper East Side (2019) = 22,600
  • New York City (Queens), NY – Astoria (2022) = 47,000
  • New York City (Queens), NY – Forest Hills = 21,000
  • New York City (Queens), NY – Jackson Heights (2020) = 22,700
  • Oakland, CA – Berkeley/University of California (2017) = 12,000
  • Oakland, CA – 33rd & Broadway (2019) = 33,000
  • Philadelphia, PA – Ardmore (2020) = 31,000
  • Philadelphia, PA – Broad & Washington (2018) = 39,000
  • Philadelphia, PA – Rittenhouse Square (2016) = 21,000
  • Philadelphia, PA – Washington Square West (2016) = 19,000
  • Philadelphia, PA – Art Museum (2017) = 38,376
  • Portland, OR – Powell (2018) = 32,100
  • Provo, UT – BYU (2018) = 26,100
  • Raleigh, NC – NCSU (2017) = 23,000
  • San Diego North Park (2019) = 35,200
  • San Diego, CA – Ocean Beach (2019)
  • San Francisco, CA – Folsom (2019) = 40,000
  • San Francisco, CA – SFSU (2017)
  • Seattle, WA – Ballard (2019) = 26,900
  • Seattle, WA – Bellevue (2020) = 49,000
  • Seattle, WA – Pike Place Market (2012) = 43,000
  • Seattle, WA – U District at the University of Washington (2019) = 21,000
  • State College, PA – Fraser Centre/Penn State (2017) = 28,000
  • Tallahassee, FL – Florida State University (2018) = 20,000
  • Washington, DC – Arlington/Ballston, VA (2021) = 41,500
  • Washington, DC – Arlington/Rosslyn, VA
  • Washington, DC – Bethesda, MD
  • Washington, DC – Cleveland Park (2019) = 24,700
  • Washington, DC – College Park/University of Maryland (2015)
  • Washington, DC – Falls Church, VA
  • Washington, DC – Georgia & Eastern (2019) = 30,000
  • Washington, DC – New York Avenue (2020) = 67,000
  • West Lafayette, IN – State & Northwestern/Purdue University (2019) = 11,800 sq.ft.

SOURCES:

https://corporate.target.com/about/shopping-experience/upcoming-store-openings
https://corporate.target.com/about/shopping-experience/Los-Angeles-market
https://corporate.target.com/about/shopping-experience/New-York-market
https://www.retaildive.com/news/target-expanding-urban-footprint-with-new-chicago-store/513628/
https://corporate.target.com/article/2017/07/july-campus-stores
http://fortune.com/2016/10/05/target-manhattan-smaller-store/
https://corporate.target.com/press/releases/2018/03/target-announces-plans-to-accelerate-multiyear-str
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/targets-small-format-stores-are-turning-into-a-big-win-for-the-retailer-2017-08-16
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2016/11/16/target-small-format-stores/93952078/
https://www.forbes.com/sites/barbarathau/2017/10/19/targets-small-format-new-york-city-store-marks-urban-push-digital-battle-with-amazon/#65ce501e12ac
https://www.moderncities.com/article/2017-mar-target-enters-the-urban-market-to-boost-lagging-sales
https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/news/2018/07/17/downtown-denver-target-photos.html
https://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/news/2018/05/29/target-store-openings-seattle-bellevue-ballard.html
https://www.cnu.org/publicsquare/2016/10/24/target-bets-big-urban-stores
https://seekingalpha.com/article/4008521-target-big-box-retailers-trying-small-flexible-format-stores
https://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/business/2016/09/06/target-to-open-urban-store.html?fb_comment_id=1108593319235651_1108913362536980
http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/skokie/news/ct-skr-west-dempster-target-tl-1102-20171030-story.html
https://onwardstate.com/2016/01/19/downtown-target-to-open-in-fraser-centre/
http://www.oakpark.com/News/Articles/11-29-2016/Target-store-coming-to-downtown-Oak-Park/
https://dailynorthwestern.com/2017/05/18/city/target-announces-plans-to-open-store-in-downtown-evanston/
https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20161102/hyde-park/hyde-park-target-open-early/
https://chicago.curbed.com/2016/7/20/12240562/new-lincoln-park-target-clark-street-grand-opening
http://chicagoist.com/2015/08/25/grab_a_beer_while_you_shop_at_targe.php
https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/2/10/central-square-target/
http://www.sherlockhomesaustin.com/new-austin-target-store/
https://www.denverpost.com/2017/05/16/target-downtown-denver-summer-2018/
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-target-stores-20151027-story.html
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20160602_Opening_dates_set_for_Center_City_Target_stores.html
https://www.tallahassee.com/story/money/2017/05/23/new-target-store-opening-tallahassee-next-year/102058768/
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/business/article183317646.html
https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/07/19/take-look-inside-mini-target-near/eIlukOa5MllIh57167nU4J/story.html
https://www.berkeleyside.com/2014/09/04/target-to-open-small-city-store-in-downtown-berkeley
http://www.startribune.com/target-this-week-opening-a-dozen-stores-including-one-in-uptown/451319553/
https://patch.com/pennsylvania/philadelphia/new-small-format-target-store-open-business-philadelphia
https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20170125/downtown-brooklyn/target-opening-city-point-albee-square/
https://www.sourceofthespring.com/business/development-news/target-announces-plans-open-small-format-store-shepherd-park/

Posted in Active transportation, adaptive reuse, architecture, bicycling, Biking, business, cities, commerce, downtown, economic development, gentrification, geography, historic preservation, infrastructure, land use, logistics, Maps, new urbanism, Passenger rail, placemaking, planning, rail, revitalization, shopping, spatial design, Statistics, Trade, transit, transportation, urban planning, walking, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Delights of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park Home


Posted in architecture, art, culture, historic preservation, history, Housing, pictures, spatial design, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

A Place with “The Wright Stuff” – Ten Planning Lessons from Oak Park, Illinois


Heurtley House in Oak Park (1902)

We had the privilege of visiting lovely Oak Park, Illinois over the Veterans Day weekend. As a planner, I was awestruck by this community and by the architectural masterpieces of it’s famous former resident, Frank Lloyd Wright.

Throughout the Oak Park, I felt I was walking amidst the Promised Land for architects and urban planners. Every corner held a new wonder, a new inspiration, or a new visual and architectural delight.

Frank Lloyd Wright home (1889) and studio (1898)

Is Oak Park perfect? Of course not. Every community has areas for improvement. But, what Oak Park does have is a forthright sense of itself, warts and all. And, the city (village) is willing to tackle the tough issues head-on. That attribute is admirable, as most places try to avoid difficult and complex issues like the plague.

Lake Theatre (1936)

Here are my thoughts on the ten planning lessons learned from this inspiring pilgrimage to Oak Park. They are presented in no particular order of importance.

  • Unlike so many suburbs, there is an actual “there” there, in Oak Park!
  • First ring inner suburbs contain charming, walkable neighborhoods that are hard, if not impossible, to match in newer suburbs.
  • A vibrant traditional downtown movie theatre is a terrific placemaking feature and community focal point.
  • Architectural, cultural, and historical walking/biking tours are a superb way to enhance community pride. They also help remind us of the importance of human-scale development.
  • Great and grand architecture never goes out of style.
  • As planners, we should be striving every day to make our communities this beautiful.
  • Preserving and protecting the homes/sites of famous citizens/events is critical to maintaining the integrity and continuity of place. In Oak Park, they have done a fine job of doing just that with the many sites pertaining to Frank Lloyd Wright and Ernest Hemingway.
  • Oak Park’s groundbreaking efforts to champion diversity and integration have had mixed results over the decades, but the fact they are continually trying to do so should be celebrated.
  • The amount of inspiration one can visualize and experience in 4.7 square miles of city (village) is quite exhilarating.
  • When a community has “The Wright Stuff,” you can sense it immediately.

Sunday morning on Lake Street

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ten Planning Lessons from Detroit’s Eastern Market


Chrome art sculpture outside of Shed 5

Anyone fortunate enough to visit engaging Detroit’s Eastern Market knows exactly what I am talking about in this post. Enjoy the list below!

Flower Day at the Eastern Market – Source: lifeinmichigan.com

  • Great third places like Detroit’s Eastern Market can and will survive and thrive through both good and bad times.
  • Every city needs accessible and affordable places to obtain fresh and nutritious food.
  • A city/farm market can also be an entertainment venue and social gathering place.
  • Detroit’s Eastern Market is a critical focal point for investment and reinvestment in the heart of the city.
  • City/farm markets promote healthy lifestyles not only through their food options, but also by their walkable nature.
  • A city/farm market can be an excellent economic gardening catalyst for supporting small family businesses/farms.
  • A city/farm market is a an important component in establishing and maintaining a comprehensive and sustainable urban food system.
  • Detroit’s Eastern Market and similar facilities provide a direct link between area farmers and local consumers.
  • Purchases made at a city/farm market recirculate capital locally.
  • A city/farm market of the stature of Detroit’s Eastern Market can come to epitomize the heart and soul of an entire city.

Pre-dawn preparation – Source: dptv.com

Posted in adaptive reuse, agriculture, business, cities, commerce, consumerism, culture, economic gardening, economics, entertainment, entrepreneurship, Food, food systems, fun, geography, health, history, infrastructure, land use, placemaking, planning, revitalization, shopping, Small business, social equity, spatial design, sustainability, third places, tourism, Travel, urban planning, walking | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

After Hours at Detroit’s Eastern Market


Chrome sculpture outside of Shed 5

Concrete, steel, and glass

Wedding reception in Shed 5

Posted in adaptive reuse, architecture, art, Cars, Cities, commerce, downtown, entertainment, Food, food systems, fun, historic preservation, history, land use, pictures, placemaking, planning, revitalization, shopping, spatial design, Travel, urban planning | Tagged | Leave a comment