Catchy and clever food truck names


VolksWaffle – Source: roaming hunger.com

Listed in alphabetical order with my favorite names shown in bold. Additional suggestions are welcome, as  long as they are (or were) real food trucks. While some of these food trucks no longer may be open, the names are still great. Thankfully, some have just moved on (or evolved) into brick and mortar locations. Peace!

I Dream of Weenie – Source: nashvilleguru.com

  • Adoughbe Pizza – Albuquerque, NM
  • Bacon Me Crazy – Twin Cities, MN
  • Basic Kneads Pizza – Denver
  • Baugettaboutit – Raleigh, NC
  • Be More Pacific – Austin, TX
  • Bite Into Maine – Cape Elizabeth, ME
  • Bun Intended Food Truck – Asheville, NC
  • Califarmia – Nashville, TN
  • Carte Blanche – Portland, OR
  • Chairman Bao – San Francisco, CA
  • Cheese Louise – Boulder. CO
  • Chef in  a Box – Ann Arbor, MI
  • Ciao Wagon – Oklahoma City, OK (What a great play on words! Sadly, up for sale.)
  • The Cluck Truck – Salt Lake City, UT
  • Crave – St. Augustine, FL (This place is awesome!)
  • Crepe’n Around – Los Angeles, CA
  • Cruisin’ Cafe – Baltimore, MD
  • Culinerdy Cruzer – Sacramento, CA
  • Curbing Your Appetite – St. Petersburg, FL
  • Curbside Cafe – Las Vegas, NV
  • Curbside Gourmet – Miami, FL
  • Curry Up Now – San Francisco, CA
  • Deli Llama – Asheville, NC
  • The Dining Car – Boston, MA
  • The Dump Truck – Portland, OR (Sells dumplings)
  • Easy Slider – Dallas, TX
  • Fins on the Hoof – San Francisco, CA
  • Fork in the Road – Twin Cities, MN, Little Rock, AR, and Brewster, NY (not a chain)
  • The Frankenstand – Los Angeles, CA
  • Franks of Antra – Detroit, MI
  • Fried Egg I’m in Love – Portland, OR  (All fans of The Cure should love this one.)
  • GastroPod – Miami, FL
  • God Save the Cuisine – San Diego, CA
  • Great Balls on Tires – Los Angeles, CA
  • The Great Foodini – Buffalo, NY
  • Grillenium Falcon – Fayetteville, AR
  • Guac N Roll – Austin, TX
  • Guerrilla Tacos – Los Angeles, CA
  • Gusto on the Go Bistro – San Luis Obispo, CA
  • Happy Grillmore – Seattle, WA
  • Haute Skillet – San Luis Obispo, CA
  • Holy Smoked – Miami, FL
  • Hoosier Daddy’s State Fair Fare – Myrtle Beach, SC
  • I Dream of Weenie – Nashville, TN
  • Jamaican Mi Crazy – Washington, DC ( added 6/18/17)
  • Kim Jong Grillin’ – San Francisco, CA
  • Kurbside Eatz – Houston, TX
  • Lettuce B Frank – Rochester, NY
  • Mamas and the Tapas – Manteca, CA
  • Mexellent – Evansville, IN
  • Munch Mobile – Boston, MA
  • The Munchie Machine – Los Angeles, CA
  • On Tapa the World – Atlanta, GA
  • Patty Wagon – Los Angeles, CA/The Patty Wagon – Salem, OR
  • Pierogi Wagon – Chicago, IL
  • Pig-N-Out BBQ – Memphis, TN
  • Planet of the Crepes – Tucson, AZ
  • Purple People Feeder – Tulsa, OK
  • Roaming Harvest – Traverse City, MI (My favorite here at home.)
  • Rolling Cones – Pittsburgh, PA
  • The Rolling Stoves – Detroit, MI
  • Sauced – Las Vegas, NV
  • Scratch Truck – Indianapolis, IN
  • SeoulFull Philly – Philadelphia, PA
  • Seoul Man Food Truck – San Diego, CA
  • Serial Grillers – Tucson, AZ
  • Slide on Over – Orlando, FL
  • Slide Ride – Chicago, IL
  • Smokin Buttz BBQ – Nashville, TN
  • Smoothie Rider – San Diego, CA
  • Starchy & Husk – Portland, OR
  • Street Eat’n – Sioux Falls, SD
  • StrEat Mobile Bistro – Cleveland, OH
  • Street-za – Milwaukee, WI
  • Stripchezze – where else but in Las Vegas, NV? (home of “The Strip” and much strip tease)
  • Taceaux Loceaux – New Orleans, LA
  • Taco Taxi – Twin Cities, MN
  • Tamale Spaceship – Chicago, IL
  • Tatoheads – Columbus, OH
  • thoroughFARE – Greenville, SC
  • Truck Norris – Los Angeles, CA
  • Twisted Mitten – Detroit, MI
  • Two for the Road – San Diego, CA
  • Urban Street Grill – Greensboro, NC
  • Vincent Van Doughnuts – St. Louis, MO
  • VolksWaffle  – Sacramento, CA (Yes, it’s in a Volkswagen van)
  • What the Fork – Dunmore, PA
  • Wok n Roll Food Truck – Cleveland, OH
  • Wurst Wagon – Honolulu, HI (Reverse psychology?)
  • Yumpling – Washington, DC
  • Zen Foodist – Boston, MA (added 6/18/17)

Stripchezze – Source: foodtrucksin.com

Best name for an organized food truck court (or grouping of food trucks) – The Little Fleet in Traverse City, MI. More on those in a future post.

Sources:

Posted in advertising, branding, Cuisine, culture, Food, fun, placemaking, planning, tourism, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , | Leave a comment

“Pierless” Piers: Longest Public Piers in the USA


Santa Monica Pier – Source: californiabeaches.com

The list below includes fishing and entertainment piers of 500 feet in length or more, but does not include commercial shipping piers/docks, private docks, jetties, breakwaters, former bridges, under bridge piers, or piers that parallel the coastline. The length is based on the distance from their inland starting point to the outer end of the pier. Any additions and/or corrections are most welcome.

Name: Length in Feet [Minimum 500 feet]: (Year Built): Type

  1. Navy Pier, Chicago, IL = 3,300′ (1916)
  2. New St. Pete Pier, FL = 3,065′ (under construction – 2018)
  3. Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, CA = 2,745′ (1914) Wooden
  4. Fort Clinch State Park Fishing Pier, Amelia Island FL = 2,400′ Concrete
  5. Riverside Park Fishing Pier, Palmetto, FL = 2000′
  6. Ocean Beach Pier, San Diego, CA = 1,971′ (1966) Concrete
  7. Stearn’s Wharf, Santa Barbara, CA = 1,950′ (1872) Wooden
  8. Oceanside Pier, CA = 1,942′ (1987) Wooden
  9. Huntington Beach Pier, CA = 1,856′ (1992) Concrete
  10. Seal Beach Pier, CA = 1,835′ (1995) Wooden
  11. Avila Beach Pier, CA = 1,685′ (1908) Wooden
  12. Belmont Veterans Memorial Pier, Long Beach, CA = 1,620′ (1967) Concrete
  13. Ventura County Pier, CA = 1,620′ (1996) Wooden
  14. Navarre Beach Pier, FL = 1,545′ (rebuilt 2010) Concrete
  15. Gulf State Park Fishing Pier, Orange Beach, AL = 1,540′ (2009) Wooden
  16. County Gulf of Mexico Fishing Pier, Panama City Beach, FL = 1,500′
  17. Russell-Fields/Panama City Beach Pier, FL = 1,500′ Concrete
  18. Imperial Beach Pier, CA = 1,491′ (1963) Concrete
  19. Lynnhaven Fishing Pier, VA = 1,480′ (1956) Wooden
  20. Pensacola Beach Pier, FL = 1,471′ Wooden
  21. Goleta Pier, CA = 1,450′ (1980s) Wooden
  22. Port Hueneme Pier, CA = 1,400′ (1999) Wooden
  23. Jacksonville Beach Fishing Pier, FL = 1,320′ (2004) Wood and concrete
  24. Pacifica Pier, CA = 1,320′ (1973) Concrete
  25. Port San Luis Pier, San Luis Obispo, CA = 1,320′ (1915) Wooden
  26. Venice Pier, CA = 1,310′ (1997)
  27. San Clemente Pier, CA = 1,296′ (1985) Wooden
  28. Fort Walton Beach/Okaloosa Island Pier, FL = 1,262′ (1972/1998) Wooden
  29. Mount Pleasant Pier, SC = 1,250′ Concrete
  30. Pismo Beach Pier, CA = 1,250′ (1986) Wooden
  31. Cabrillo Pier, San Pedro, CA = 1,200′ (1988) Concrete
  32. Horace Caldwell Fishing Pier, Port Aransas, TX = 1,200′ (Concrete)
  33. Jetty Park Pier, Canaveral, FL = 1,250′ Wooden
  34. Apache Pier, Myrtle Beach, SC – 1,206′ Wooden
  35. Johnnie Mercer’s Pier, Wrightsville, Beach, NC = 1,200′ Concrete
  36. Redington Long Pier, FL = 1,200′ (1962) Wooden
  37. Historic Galveston Pleasure Pier = 1,130′ (2012) Concrete
  38. Pier 60, Clearwater, FL = 1,080′ Concrete
  39. Santa Monica Pier, CA = 1,080′ (1909) Wooden
  40. Springmaid Pier, Myrtle Beach, SC = 1,060′ (1954/being rebuilt) Wooden
  41. Folly Beach Pier, SC = 1,045′ Wooden
  42. Newport Beach Pier, CA = 1,032′ (1940) Wooden
  43. Bogus Inlet Pier, Emerald Isle, NC = 1,000 ‘ (rebuilt in 1997)
  44. Daytona Beach Pier, FL = 1000′ (1901)
  45. Fort Desoto Gulf Fishing Pier, St. Pete Beach, FL = 1,000′ Concrete
  46. Hermosa Beach Pier, CA = 1,000′ (1914) Concrete
  47. Jeanette’s Pier, Nags Head, NC = 1,000′
  48. Naples Municipal Pier, FL = 1,000′ (rebuilt 1960) Wooden
  49. Old Orchard Beach Pie, ME = 1,000′ Wooden
  50. Seaview Fishing Pier, Topsail Beach, NC = 1,000′
  51. Steel Pier, Atlantic City, NJ = 1,000′ (1898) Concrete and steel
  52. Cherry Grove Pier, North Myrtle Beach, NC = 985′ (rebuilt in 2000) Wooden
  53. Surf City Ocean Pier, Topsail Beach, NC = 977′ (rebuilt 1997) Wooden
  54. Deerfield Beach International Fishing Pier, FL = 976′ Concrete
  55. Lockhart Pier, Lake Worth, FL = 975′
  56. Cayucos Pier, Morro Bay, CA = 972′ (rebuilt 2015) Wooden
  57. Ballast Point Fishing Pier, Tampa, FL = 970′
  58. Ocean Isle Beach Pier, NC = 960′ Wooden
  59. Sunglow Fishing Pier, Daytona Beach Shores, FL = 950′ (1960) Wooden
  60. Surf City Pier, NC = 937′
  61. Manhattan Beach Pier, CA = 928′ (1920) Concrete
  62. Balboa Pier, Newport Beach, CA = 920′ (1906) Wooden
  63. 2nd Avenue Pier, Myrtle Beach, SC = 906′ (1936/1989) Wooden
  64. Anglin’s Fishing Pier, Lauderdale by the Sea, FL = 900′ (1963) Wooden
  65. B Street Pier, Crescent City, CA = 900′ (1989) Wooden
  66. Dania Beach Ocean Fishing Pier, FL = 900′ Concrete
  67. Mexico Beach Pier, FL = 900′
  68. Sunset Beach Pier, NC = 900′
  69. Ocean Crest Pier, Oak Island, NC  = 893′ Wooden
  70. Crystal Pier, San Diego, CA = 872′ (1936) Wooden
  71. Biloxi Lighthouse Pier, MS = 865′ (rebuilt in 2013) Wooden
  72. Jolly roger fishing Pier, Topsail Beach, NC = 950′
  73. Pompano Beach Ocean Fishing Pier, FL = 850′ (1963) – to be replaced by 2019
  74. San Simeon Pier, CA = 850′ (1983) Wooden
  75. Surfside Pier, SC = 830′ (being rebuilt) Wooden
  76. Flagler Beach Municipal Pier, FL = 806′ (1927) Wooden
  77. Cocoa Beach Pier, FL = 800′ (1962/1983) Wooden
  78. Malibu Pier, CA = 780′ (2003) Wooden
  79. Anna Maria City Pier, FL = 776′ (1911) Wooden
  80. Nags Head Fishing Pier, NC = 750′ Wooden
  81. Oceanian Fishing Pier, Atlantic Beach, NC = 731′
  82. Indian Riverside Park Fishing Pier, Jensen Beach, FL = 725′
  83. Kure Beach Pier, NC = 712′ (rebuilt in 1997)
  84. Carolina Beach Pier, NC = 700′ Wooden
  85. Holden Beach Fishing Pier, NC = 700′
  86. Pier’s end, Garibaldi, OR = 700′ (1934) Wooden
  87. Juno Beach Fishing Pier, FL = 700′ Concrete
  88. Rodanthe Pier, NC = 700′
  89. Tarpon Street Fishing Pier, Fort Myers, FL = 700′
  90. Venice Fishing Pier, FL = 700′
  91. Vilano Fishing Pier, FL = 700′ Concrete
  92. Avalon Fishing Pier, NC = 696′
  93. The Pier at Garden City, SC = 668′ Wooden
  94. Gasparilla Fishing Pier, FL = 650′
  95. Reddit Point Reserve Fishing Pier, Jacksonville, Fl = 650 ‘
  96. Ocean City Fishing Pier, NJ = 635′ (1916) Wooden
  97. Avon Fishing Pier, NC = 600′ (rebuilt in 2012) Wooden
  98. Bayshore Live Oak Park Pier, Charlotte Harbor, FL = 600′
  99. Carnarsie Pier, New York city, NY = 600′ (1920)
  100. Melbourne Beach Historic Fishing Pier, FL = 600′
  101. Outer Banks Fishing Pier, NC = 600′
  102. Snoopy’s Pier, Corpus Christi, TX = 600′
  103. Yacht Club Fishing Pier, Cape Coral, FL = 600′
  104. Fort Myers Beach Pier, FL = 560′ Wooden
  105. Bradenton Beach City Pier, FL  = 550′
  106. County Dock Fishing Pier, Jacksonville, FL = 525′
  107. Spring Park Fishing Pier, Green Cove Springs, FL = 520′
  108. Anclote Park Fishing Pier, FL = 500′
  109. Laishley Park Fishing Pier, Punta Gorda, FL = 500′
  110. Riverview Fishing Pier, Sebastian, FL = 500′
  111. St. Andrews Pier, Panama City, FL = 500 (1961) Wooden
  112. Sebastian Inlet Fishing Pier, FL = 500′

Seeking additional information

  • Dunbar Pier, Bay St. Louis, MS (rebuilt in 2006) Wooden
  • Jennette’s Pier, NC
  • Ken Combs Pier, MS (rebuilt in 2015)
  • Maine State Pier (1924)
  • Virginia Beach Fishing Pier Wooden
  • St. Augustine Beach Pier, FL Wood and Concrete
  • Crest Pier, Wildwood Crest, NJ
  • Merry Pier, St. Pete Beach, FL
  • Money’s Piers, Wildwood,NJ
  • Myrtle Beach State Park Pier, SC Wooden
  • Oak Island Pier, NC Wooden
  • Ocean View Fishing Pier, Norfolk, VA
  • Pier A, New York City, NY (1886)
  • Pier 39, San Francisco, CA (1977)
  • Sandbridge Little Island Pier, VA (2006)
  • 14 Avenue Pier, Myrtle Beach, SC

SOURCES:

Posted in cities, entertainment, fun, geography, historic preservation, infrastructure, land use, nature, placemaking, Statistics, tourism, Travel | Tagged | Leave a comment

247 Smart cities and counting…


Above is a map of showing the 247 cities to date (as of 6/6/17) where the mayor has pledged their city will adhere to the Paris Climate Accord commitments on greenhouse gases. I am very proud to say our own Mayor, Jim Carruthers of Traverse City was one of the earliest signers.

Thus far, the only states without participant cities are the two Dakotas, Delaware, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Since the map was prepared, the Mayor of  Louisville, Kentucky has signed on.

Hopefully, as time passes, some will join from these states, as well. Dartmouth and Durham, NH; Jackson Hole, WY; Lincoln, NE; Lawrence, KS; Newark, DE; Norman, OK; and Shepherdstown, WV all seem like potential candidates to join.

Please consider contacting your mayor and asking them to stand up for Mother Earth as we unify across this country to support the Paris Climate Accord and fight climate change.

Don’t be a Fossil Fool!

Posted in Active transportation, Advocacy, Alternative energy, branding, cities, climate change, culture, education, environment, geography, government, health, humanity, Maps, nature, planning, politics, pollution, Renewable Energy, States, sustainability, transportation, urban planning, weather | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ten planning lessons from St. Augustine


Now that I’ve had a chance to ponder some about all the wondrous sights and scenes of St. Augustine, here are my ten planning lessons from that amazing city.

  • You don’t need to be a big city to be a great city!
  • Spanish colonial architecture is absolutely gorgeous.
  • Preserving a city’s history, architecture, and cultural heritage can be a great economic engine.
  • A diverse mix of cultures is critical to creating a vibrant community.
  • Architectural and design standards are important to preserving continuity and historical context.
  • Streets designed for pedestrians are wonderful.
  • A city built at a human scale can sooth and charm the senses in so many ways.
  • There are some communities in Florida where sprawl has not destroyed the ambiance of place.
  • A community can address troubling aspects of its past in an open, thoughtful, inclusive, and respectful manner.
  • Balancing between the needs of tourists and the needs of residents can be a delicate and continuous challenge.
Posted in architecture, art, cities, civics, civility, commerce, culture, diversity, downtown, economic development, entertainment, environment, geography, historic preservation, history, humanity, inclusiveness, land use, placemaking, planning, spatial design, third places, tourism, traffic, transportation, Travel, zoning | Leave a comment

Comeback music artist of the year – Land of Talk


Source: thelineofbestfit.com

With the exception of our friends in Canada and indie music fans like myself, I doubt many of you reading this post will recognize the name Land of Talk. Well, that is unfortunate, because you missed out on hearing great music from a terrific band during the later 2000s. However, both you and the band; born, nurtured, and epitomized through Elizabeth Powell, now get a second chance to rectify history.

Land of Talk virtually disappeared from the radar screens after 2010 due to several unfortunate events, including a stroke befalling Ms. Powell’s father, whom she cared for afterwards. Eventually, hints and snippets of new music began to filter out starting in 2015 and on May 19th, the band released its first new album in seven years, aptly entitled Life After Youth.

Life After Youth is easily my favorite album released to date in 2017. It is simply a tour de force effort by Liz and her bandmates. Each and every song is a worthy addition to the record, though my personal favorites are:

  • “Loving” – awesome guitars and a head-banging beat
  • “Macabre” – probably the best album-ending song ever
  • “This Time” – captures the essence of the album and the band’s comeback
  • “Inner Love” – introspective

Please consider checking out Life After Youth and other previously released music by Land of Talk. You won’t be disappointed!

Posted in art, Canada, music, video, Women, writing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Explorer cities of North America


Below is a list of cities across North America known to be named for famous land and sea explorers.  Frankly, I’m rather surprised there are not more. Please feel free to pass along any corrections or additions.  Peace!

Vasco Núñez de Balboa
  • Balboa, California
  • Balboa section of Panama City, Panama
Juan Bautista de Anza
 
  • Anza, California
Daniel Boone
  • Boone, North Carolina
  • Boonesboro, Kentucky
  • Booneville, Arkansas
Jim Bridger
  • Bridger, Montana
  • Fort Bridger, Wyoming
Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac
  • Cadillac, Michigan
Kit Carson
  • Carson City, Nevada
Jacques Cartier
  • Port-Cartier, Quebec
Samuel de Champlain
  • Champlain, New York
  • Champlain, Quebec
William Clark
  • Clarkston, Washington

Christopher Columbus

  • Columbus, Ohio
  • Columbus, Georgia
  • Columbus, Indiana
  • Columbus, Mississippi
  • Colon, Panama
  • Columbia, South Carolina
  • Columbia, Missouri
James Cook
 
  • Captain Cook, Hawaii
Simon Fraser
  • Fort Fraser, British Columbia
John C. Fremont
  • Fremont, California
  • Fremont, Nebraska
  • Fremont, Ohio
  • Fremont, Indiana
  • Fremont, Michigan
  • Fremont, Minnesota
  • Fremont, New Hampshire
  • Fremont, New York
  • Fremont, Utah
  • Fremont, Wisconsin
Martin Frobisher
  • Frobisher, Saskatchewan
Robert Gray  (added 5/31/17)
  • Grayland, Washington
  • Grays Harbor City, Washington
  • Gray’s River, Washington
Ferdinand Hayden
 
  • Hayden, Colorado
Father Louis Hennepin
  • Hennepin, Illinois
Henry Hudson
  • Hudson New York
  • Hudson, New Hampshire
Louis Jolliet
  • Joliet, Illinois
René-Robert Cavelierde LaSalle
  • LaSalle, Illinois
  • LaSalle, Ontario
  • Lasalle, Quebec (now part of Montreal)
Juan Ponce de Leon
 
  • Ponce De Leon, Florida
Meriwether Lewis
 
  • Lewiston, Idaho
  • Lewisburg, Tennessee
  • Lewistown, Montana
Father Jacques Marquette
  • Marquette, Michigan
  • Marquette, Iowa
Jean Nicolet
  • Nicolet, Quebec
Joseph Nicollet
  • Nicollet, Minnesota
Peter Skene Ogden
  • Ogden, Utah
William Edward Parry
  • Parry Sound, Ontario
Zebulon Pike
 
  • Pike, New York
  • Piketon, Ohio
  • Pikeville, Indiana
  • Pikesville, Kentucky
  • Pikesville, Maryland
 Gaspar de Portola
  • Portola, California
  • Portola Valley, California
John Wesley Powell
  • Powell, Wyoming
Nathaniel Hale Pryor
  • Pryor, Oklahoma
  • Pryor, Montana
Sir Walter Raleigh
  • Raleigh, North Carolina
Pierre-Jean De Smet
 
  • De Smet, Idaho
  • DeSmet, Montana
  • De Smet, South Dakota

Hernando de Soto

  • DeSoto, Missouri
  • De Soto, Kansas
  • Hernando, Florida
 David Thompson
  • Thompson Falls, Montana
George Vancouver
  • Vancouver, British Columbia
  • Vancouver, Washington
  • North Vancouver, British Columbia
  • West Vancouver, British Columbia
SOURCES: en.wikipedia.org and personal knowledge
Posted in cities, geography, hiking, history, North America, place names, sailing, topography, transportation, Travel, walking | Tagged , | Leave a comment

“A Handmaid’s Tale” – Is fiction becoming reality?


Source: amazon.com

Though written 32 years ago, the dystopian theocratic society described in Margaret Atwood’s striking novel bears an uncanny likeness to what is (and has been for some time) being preached and advocated by far-right political and religious zealots in our country. That is what makes her book so damn scary ~ some aspects of the story have already come true just as she foreshadowed more than three decades ago!

Each week it seems more of our nation’s civil liberties are being subverted in some manner by those who wish to impose their predetermined set of ultra-conservative Christian theocratic beliefs on the rest of us.  That is not anywhere close what our founders intended. But more importantly, it is dangerous to the health and well-being of a pluralistic society.

A Handmaid’s Tale is more than a novel, it is a cautionary tale of a dismal future which could be unfolding before our very eyes, especially if we don’t stand up to injustice and intolerance. Some may scoff at this notion, but they apparently miss the point. For one, we must never doubt how intoxicating power can be to humans, whether they are religious or not. Furthermore, one can point to George Orwell’s classic 1984 as an example of a novel that accurately predicted many future events. Lastly, those are discriminated against in our society in the name of religion, such as the LGBTQ community and women, can certainly point to many disturbing actions and trends that not so subtly echo occurrences in A Handmaid’s Tale.

Ms. Atwood’s book should be required reading in all high schools across America. If for no other reason, to alert young people of the dangers of indifference and lack of civic participation.  Peace.

Source: comingsoon.net

Posted in art, book reviews, books, Canada, censorship, civics, civility, Communications, culture, feminism, futurism, human rights, humanity, Labor, literature, Love, Religion, Women, writing | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment