Cleverly cultivated cannabis shop names

Source: cannabliss-nm.com

The following list identifies those existing cannabis shop names that are catchy and clever from a business branding, marketing, and advertising standpoint. Of these, my selections for the best five names are the following:

  1. Cannabliss (or blyss)

2. Karmaceuticals

3. Atomic Budz

4. Grateful Meds

5. The Reefinery

While doing the research for this post, the most common terms found in cannabis shop names tend to include variations of “high”, “buds(z)”, “canna”, “field(s)”, “flower”, “weed”, “leaf”, “med”, “zen”, “grass” or “sky.” Please feel free to pass along any other existing cannabis shop names you might think are good. Peace!

Source: weedmaps.com ……. Source: mobile.twitter.com

A Quaint Joint – cute

Ascend

Atomic Budz – I like this one – best logo too

Bee Highve

Best Daze

Bud Buffet

Bud Hut

Buds4u – does Anheuser-Busch knows about this?

Cannabliss – awesome name!

Cannablyss – awesome name too, with just a slight variation!

Cloud Cannabis

Dank of America – nice play on the bank name

Elevated

Emerald Fields

Enlightened

Eureka Sky

Field of Dreams

Fillabong

Flower Power Botanicals

Flower to the People

Ganja Goddess

Ganja Gourmet

Good Chemistry

Grateful Med(s) – nice play in the Grateful Dead

Higher Elevation

Hi Fidelity – would like this better if it was High Fidelity

High Life Medic

Higher Love

High Plainz Strains

High Q

High Society

Hippy Trip

Hollyweed – catchy name from California

Karmaceuticals – well done!

Lucy Sky

Lume – Latin for “light”

Lytt

MedMen – nice play on Madmen, but leaves out the ladies

Mile High – from Colorado, of course

One Hit Wonder – cute

Pipe Dreams – well done, though doesn’t account for alternatives like gummies

Pleasantrees

Skymint

Starbuds

Stash

The Farmacy – nice play on words

The Flower Bowl

The Grass Station – ain’t no gas here

The Growcery – another nice play on words

The Happy Camper

The Peace Pipe

The REEF

The Reefinery – nice play on words

Thrive

The ReLeaf Center

Tumbleweed

TweedLeaf

Zen Leaf

Source: leafly.com

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If you are thinking about opening your own cannabis retail business, here are two books on the topic available on Amazon.com*.

Link – Start Your Own Link – Retail Handbook

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using the above links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in advertising, branding, business, commerce, Communications, consumerism, culture, economic development, entrepreneurship, health, Health care, land use, marketing, natural and organic foods, place names, product design, tourism, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ten planning lessons from the elegant oasis of Palm Springs

Below are ten (10) planning lessons from the beautiful desert city of Palm Springs, California. Peace!

Few places have such a dramatic elevation change in such a short distance (up to 9,000 feet in four miles). This makes Palm Springs’ visual backdrop so awe-inspiring. It also makes maintaining the continuity of these remarkable viewsheds that much more vital to the well-being of the community.

The “Palm Springs” name is a brand unto itself that people recognize globally. Few cities have this luxury and it is an excellent marketing and economic development tool.

The collection of mid-century modern architecture in Palm Springs is museum worthy. It’s a pleasure to see that preservation efforts in Palm Springs have been so successful.

The great diversity of plant and animal life here in the desert is more proof that the term “desert” is a serious misnomer for places which are lacking something – e.g. “food desert.”

The popularity of the aerial tramway connecting Palm Springs with the gorgeous San Jacinto Mountains demonstrates the potential usefulness of aerial trams/gondolas as a mass transportation option, especially in those cities with rugged landscapes.

Palm Springs is full of contrasts – houseless sleeping on the streets within view of luxurious stores and movie star residences; cool mountain landscapes above and desert heat in the valley; lush manicured golf courses abutting rugged arid desert; and peaceful solitude interrupted by high altitude military aircraft overflights.

As note directly above, even a very wealthy resort enclave in the desert is not exempt from real world problems such as a houseless population.

The City of Palm Springs and the Agua Caliente tribe have worked in unison for the betterment of both populations. This is a welcome alternative to what is seen in far too many places in and near indigenous communities.

Downtown Palm Springs is a fun, energetic, entertaining, and walkable place that exudes vibrancy. More cities should observe what they’ve accomplished so successfully here.

As additional cities have sprung up in the Coachella Valley each seems to be trying to outdo the others for luxuriousness and amenities. This has led to “resort sprawl.” It is akin to what is seen along the Florida coastlines, in the Orlando area, in Vegas, and other similar places. However, the nine (9) cities from Desert Hot Springs to Coachella appear to be working together to solve shared problem of affordable housing, non-motorized transportation, and water conservation through the Coachella Valley Council of Governments (CVAG).

Posted in Active transportation, adaptive reuse, Alternative transportation, architecture, art, bicycling, branding, Cities, civics, climate, commerce, culture, deserts, diversity, downtown, economic development, entertainment, Environment, fun, geography, Geology, health, hiking, historic preservation, history, Housing, humanity, inclusiveness, infrastructure, land use, landscape architecture, marketing, mountains, natural history, Nature, pictures, place names, placemaking, planning, poverty, recreation, skylines, spatial design, sprawl, Statistics, third places, topography, tourism, Transportation, Travel, Uncategorized, urban design, Urban Gondolas, urban planning, visual pollution, walking, weather, xeriscaping, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gems in the desert – Mid-Century Modern homes of Palm Springs

Below are photos of some of the amazing Mid-Century Modern homes that have been preserved in Palm Springs, California. Any trip to the city should include a driving tour to see some of the architectural wonders found throughout the city. Maps are available for sale at the city’s visitor’s center located in a striking mid-century gas station (see below).

Palm Springs Visitors Center – Source: trip savvy.com

Beyond the visitors center, there are many fascinating commercial, retail, lodging, and office buildings of Mid-Century Modern design to see, as well. One can only drool over the architectural gems found here in this beautiful desert oasis. Peace!

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If modernist architecture interests you, here are several books on the topic, focusing on Palm Springs, that are available through Amazon.com* links provided below.

Link – Modernist Paradise Link – Postcard Book Link – Mid-Century Modern

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using the above links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Posted in architecture, art, Cities, culture, deserts, entertainment, fun, historic preservation, history, Housing, land use, placemaking, product design, tourism, Travel, urban planning | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tallest skyscrapers in North American suburbs

Skyline of San Pedro Garza García, Mexico – Source: commons.wikimedia.org

The following list identifies the tallest skyscrapers found in suburban cities of North America. The list only includes completed skyscrapers and ones that were confirmed to be under construction. Proposed towers are not included. Suburban cities with the most skyscrapers on the list are the following:

  • Jersey City, NJ and Paradise NV = 15 each
  • Burnaby, BC; Mississauga, ON; and Sunny Isles Beach, FL = 8 each
  • San Pedro Garza García, MX = 7
  • Vaughan, ON = 5
  • Winchester NV = 3

Burnaby, BC skyline – Source: depositphotos.com

The core urban centers whose suburbs have the most skyscrapers on this list are:

  • Las Vegas = 18
  • New York City = 15
  • Toronto and Vancouver = 13 each
  • Miami = 10

As can be seen from the complete list below, several of these suburbs have skyscrapers that are approaching supertall status (1,000 feet or greater in height). Given the pace of construction taking place in these suburbs, is should not be long before that happens. In fact, one is already proposed in San Pedro Garza García.

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  1. Torre KOI – San Pedro Garza García (Monterrey), Mexico = 916 feet, 65 floors

2. 99 Hudson Street – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 900 feet, 79 floors

3. M3 Tower – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 853 feet, 81 floor (2023)

4. 30 Hudson Street – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 781 feet, 42 floors

5. Hotel Safi Metro. – San Pedro Garza García (Monterrey), Mexico = 764 feet, 56 floors

6. Journal Square 2 – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 754 feet, 70 floors

7. Fontainebleau – Winchester (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 735 feet, 63 floors (2023)

8-9. tie – M4 Tower – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 705 feet, 67 floors (2024)

& Two Gilmore Place – Burnaby (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 705 feet, 64 floors (2025)

10. Urby – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 700 feet, 70 floors

11. Resorts World – Winchester (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 673 feet, 59 floors

12. M2 Tower – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 659 feet, 61 floors (2023)

13-14. tie – M3 Tower – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 649 feet, 60 floors (2023)

& Muse – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 649 feet, 47 floors

15. Mansions at Acqualina – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 643 feet, 46 floors

16. The Palazzo – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 642 feet, 52 floors

17. Porsche Design Tower – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 641 feet, 57 floors

18. Trump International Hotel – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 640 feet, 64 floors

19. Jade Signature – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 636 feet, 57 floors

20. CG Tower – Vaughan (Toronto), ON, Canada = 634 feet, 60 floors (2023)

21. Encore at Wynn – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 631 feet, 52 floors

22. Haus 25 – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 626 feet, 70 floors

23. Altus – Burnaby (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 616 feet, 49 floors

24. Festival Tower A – Vaughan (Toronto), ON, Canada = 615 feet, 59 floors (2024)

25. Wynn Hotel/Casino – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 614 feet, 49 floors

26-27. tie -Brentwood 1 & 2 – Burnaby (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 611 feet, 54 floors each

28-29. tie – The Cosmopolitan (2) – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 610 feet, 61 floors each

30-32. tie – Bellevue 600 – Bellevue (Seattle), WA, USA = 600 feet, 43 floors (2024)

& Aria Resort/Casin – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 600 feet, 48 floors

& Elara – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 600 feet, 56 floors

33. Brentwood 3 – Burnaby (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 597 feet, 55 floors

34. Metropolitan Center Torre II – San Pedro Garza García (Monterrey), Mexico = 594 feet, 52 floors

35. Absolute World South – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 589 feet, 56 floors

36. Transit City Condos 3 – Vaughan (Toronto), ON, Canada = 587 feet, 55 floors

37. Pier West 1 – New Westminster (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 584 feet, 53 floors (2023)

38. Festival Tower C – Vaughan (Toronto), ON, Canada = 583 feet, 55 floors (2024)

39-40. tie -Transit City Condos 1 & 2 – Vaughan (Toronto), ON, Canada = 575 feet, 55 floors each

41-42. tie – Jade Beach – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 574 feet, 53 floors

& Journal Square 1 – Jersey City (New York City), NJ, USA = 574 feet, 54 floors

43. Transit City Condos 4 Vaughan (Toronto), ON, Canada = 572 feet, 50 floors (2023)

44-45. tie – Concourse Center V – Sandy Springs (Atlanta), GA, USA = 570 feet, 34 floors

& Vdara – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 570 feet, 57 floors

46. Hyatt Regency – Zapopan (Guadalajara), Mexico = 568 feet, 41 floors

47. LIU East – San Pedro Garza García (Monterrey), Mexico = 564 feet, 39 floors

48. Torre Aura Altitude – Zapopan (Guadalajara), Mexico = 563 feet, 44 floors

49. Waldorf Astoria – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 560 feet, 47 floors

50. Concourse Center VI -Sandy Springs, GA (Atlanta), GA, USA = 553 feet, 34 floors

51. Trump Palace – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 551 feet, 43 floors

52-53. tie – Acqualina Ocean – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 550 feet, 51 floors

& Trump Royale – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 550 feet, 43 floors

54-55. tie – 101 Hudson – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 548 feet, 42 floors

& Torre Avalanz – San Pedro Garza García (Monterrey), Mexico = 548 feet, 43 floors

56. Jade Ocean – Sunny Isles Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 545 feet, 51 floors

57. Eiffel Tower LV – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 540 feet, 54 floors

58. 235 Grand – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 537 feet, 45 floors

59. Station Square III – Burnaby (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 535 feet, 48 floors

60-61. tie – 567 Clarke/Como – Coquitlam (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 532 feet, 49 floors

& Trump Plaza – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 532 feet, 55 floors

62. Newport Tower – Jersey City (New York City), NJ, USA = 531 feet, 37 floors

63-64. tie -70 & 90 Columbus – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 530 feet, 48 floors each

65-66. tie – Absolute World N. – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 529 feet, 50 floors

& New York, New York – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 529 feet, 45 floors

67. Torre Sofia – San Pedro Garza García (Monterrey), Mexico = 518 feet, 40 floors

68. Palms Place – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 517 feet, 48 floors

69. Civic Plaza – Surrey (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 516 feet, 52 floors

70. Exchange Place – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 515 feet, 38 floors

71. The Martin – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 514 feet, 32 floors

72. Torre Helicon – San Pedro Garza García (Monterrey), Mexico = 512 feet, 33 floors

73. Sovereign – Burnaby (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 511 feet, 45 floors

74-75. tie – Monaco N. & S. – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 509 feet, 47 floors each

76-77. tie – Westin Hotel – Virginia Beach (Norfolk), VA, USA = 508 feet, 38 floors

& Bellagio Hotel/Casino – Paradise (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 508 feet, 36 floors

78-80. tie – PSV @ Parkside Village – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 502 feet, 48 floors

& Blue & Green Diamond – Miami Beach (Miami), FL, USA = 502 feet, 44 floors each

81. Burquitlam Park – Coquitlam (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 501 feet, 50 floors (2024)

82-86. tie – Gold House North – Burnaby (Vancouver), BC, Canada = 500 feet, 41 floors

& Pinnacle Grand Park II – Mississauga (Toronto), ON, Canada = 500 feet, 48 floors

& 70 Greene Street – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 500 feet, 50 floors

& 77 Hudson – Jersey City (New York), NJ, USA = 500 feet, 50 floors

& Sky – Winchester (Las Vegas), NV, USA = 500 feet, 45 floors

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If booming suburbs interest you, here are several books on the topic available through Amazon.com.*

Link – Vertical Bellevue Link – Livable Mississauga Link – Global Suburbs

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using the above links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

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SOURCES:

Posted in architecture, Canada, cities, downtown, economic development, engineering, geography, history, infrastructure, land use, Latin America, Mexico, North America, placemaking, planning, skylines, skyscrapers, spatial design, Statistics, tourism, Travel, urban design, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Most populous suburbs of North America

Source: mapcarta.com

The list below identifies the most populous suburbs of North America. Cities with the most suburbs on the list include:

  • Mexico City = 14
  • Los Angeles = 9 when including the Inland Empire
  • Toronto and Monterrey = 6 each
  • Dallas-Fort Worth and Phoenix = 5 each
  • Port-au-Prince and Las Vegas = 4 each
  • New York City, Santo Domingo, and Vancouver = 3 each
Source: youtube.com

For countries wholes census or population estimates were more than 10 years old, World Population Review was used as a resources instead of en.wikipedia.org. A minimum population of 200,000 was required for inclusion in the list. Please feel free to forward any additions, corrections, or suggestions. Peace!

Torres de Satélite in Naucalpan, Mexico – Source: archdaily.com
  1. Ecatepec (Mexico City), Mexico = 1,643,623 (2020)

2. Zapopan (Guadalajara), Mexico = 1,257,547 (2020)

3. Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl (Mexico City), Mexico = 1,072,676 (2020)

4. Naucalpan (Mexico City), Mexico = 911,168 (2020)

5. Mississauga (Toronto), Ontario, Canada = 717,961 (2021)

6. Chimalhuacán (Mexico City), Mexico = 703,215 (2020)

7. Santo Domingo Oeste (Santo Domingo), Dominican Republic = 701,269 (2022 est.)

8. Tlalnepantla (Mexico City), Mexico = 658,907 (2020)

9. Brampton (Toronto), Ontario, Canada = 656,480 (2021)

10. Guadalupe (Monterrey), Mexico = 635,862 (2020)

11. Santo Domingo Este (Santo Domingo), Dominican Republic = 700,000 (2022 est.)

12. Villa Nueva (Guatemala City), Guatemala = 618,397 (2018)

13. New Kingston (Kingston), Jamaica = 583,958 (2022 est.)

14. Surrey (Vancouver), British Columbia, Canada = 568,322 (2021)

15. Cuautitlán Izcalli (Mexico City), Mexico = 555,163 (2020)

16. Ciudad Apodaca (Monterrey), Mexico = 536,436 (2020)

17. Ciudad López Mateos (Mexico City), Mexico = 523,065 (2020)

18. Carrefour (Port-au-Prince), Haiti = 511,345 (2015 est.)

19. Mesa (Phoenix), Arizona, USA = 504,258 (2020)

20. Long Beach (Los Angeles), California, USA = 466,742 (2020)

21. Mixco (Guatemala City), Guatemala = 465,773 (2018)

22. Virginia Beach (Norfolk), Virginia, USA = 459,470 (2020)

23. General Escobedo (Monterrey), Mexico = 454,967 (2020)

24. Tonalá (Guadalajara), Mexico = 442,440 (2020)

25. Laval (Montreal), Quebec, Canada = 438,366 (2021)

26. San Nicolás de los Garza (Monterrey), Mexico = 412,199 (2020)

27. Delmas (Port-au-Prince), Haiti = 395,260 (2015 est.)

28. Arlington (Dallas-Fort Worth), Texas, USA = 394,266 (2020)

29, Ojo de Agua (Mexico City), Mexico = 386,290 (2020)

30. Aurora (Denver), Colorado, USA = 386,261 (2020)

31. Xico (Mexico City), Mexico = 384,327 (2020)

32. Pétion-Ville (Port-au-Prince), Haiti = 376,834 (2015 est.)

33. Ixtapaluca (Mexico City), Mexico = 368,585 (2020)

34. Markham (Toronto), Ontario, Canada = 338,503 (2021)

35. Soyapango (San Salvador), El Salvador = 329,708 (2022 est.)

36. Anaheim (Los Angeles), California, USA = 324,824 (2020)

37. Ciudad Nicolás Romero (Mexico City), Mexico = 323,545 (2020)

38. Vaughan (Toronto), Ontario, Canada = 323,103 (2021)

39. Henderson (Las Vegas), Nevada, USA = 317,610 (2020)

40. Riverside (Los Angels), California, USA = 314,998 (2020)

41. Newark (New York City), New Jersey, USA = 311,549 (2020)

42. Santa Ana (Los Angeles), California, USA = 310,227 (2020)

43. Soledad (San Luis Potosi), Mexico = 310,192 (2020)

44. Ciudad Benito Juárez (Monterrey), Mexico = 308,285 (2020)

45. Irvine (Los Angeles), California, USA = 307,670 (2020)

46. Santa Catarina (Monterrey), Mexico = 304,052 (2020)

47. San Francisco Coacalco (Mexico City), Mexico = 293,245 (2020)

48. Jersey City (New York City), New Jersey, USA = 292,449 (2020)

49. Gatineau (Ottawa), Quebec, Canada = 291,041 (2021)

50. Santo Domingo Norte (Santo Domingo), Dominican Republic = 286,912 (2010)

51. Plano (Dallas-Fort Worth), Texas, USA = 285,494 (2020)

52. Texcoco de Mora (Mexico City), Mexico = 277,562 (2020)

53. Chandler (Phoenix), Arizona, USA = 275,987 (2020)

54. Chula Vista (San Diego), California, USA = 275,487 (2020)

55. Gilbert (Phoenix), Arizona, USA = 267,918 (2020)

56. Cité Soleil (Port-au-Prince), Haiti = 265,072 (2015 est.)

57. North Las Vegas (Las Vegas), Nevada, USA = 262,527 (2020)

58. Irving (Dallas-Fort Worth), Texas, USA = 256,684 (2020)

59. Longueuil (Montreal), Quebec, Canada = 254,483 (2021)

60. Chesapeake (Norfolk), Virginia, USA = 249,422 (2020)

61. Burnaby (Vancouver), British Columbia, Canada = 249,125 (2021)

62. Glendale (Phoenix), Arizona, USA = 248,325 (2020)

63. Garland (Dallas-Fort Worth), Texas, USA = 246,018 (2022)

64. Scottsdale (Phoenix), Arizona, USA = 241,361 (2020)

65. Arlington (Washington, DC), Virginia, USA = 236,434 (2020)

66. Fremont (San Francisco-Oakland), California, USA = 230,504 (2020)

67. Windsor (Detroit), Ontario, Canada = 229,660 (2021)

68. Santa Clarita (Los Angeles), California, USA = 228,673 (2020)

69. Hialeah (Miami), Florida, USA = 223,109 (2020)

70. San Bernardino (Los Angeles), California, USA = 222,101 (2020)

71. Enterprise, (Las Vegas), Nevada, USA = 221,831 (2020) – added 10/29/22

72. Apopa (San Salvador), El Salvador = 217,773 (2010)

73. Buenavista (Mexico City), Mexico = 216,776 (2020)

74. Oakville (Toronto), Ontario, Canada = 213,759 (2021)

75. Yonkers (New York City), New York, USA = 211,569 (2020)

76. Richmond (Vancouver), British Columbia, Canada = 209,937 (2021)

77. Moreno Valley (Los Angeles), California, USA) = 208,634 (2020)

78. Fontana (Los Angeles), California, USA = 208,393 (2020)

79. Sunrise Manor (Las Vegas), Nevada, USA = 205,618 (2020)

80. Port St. Lucie (Fort Pierce), Florida, USA = 204,851 (2020)

81. Richmond Hill (Toronto), Ontario, Canada = 202,022 (2021)

82. Frisco (Dallas-Fort Worth), Texas, USA = 200,509 (2020)

Mississauga, Ontario – Source: accoustical-consultants.com

SOURCES:

Posted in Canada, cities, demographics, geography, Latin America, Mexico, North America, planning, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Places that pay you to “kick your grass” goodbye!

Source: houselogic.com

After we moved to New Mexico this summer, one of the first steps we took was to have the grass lawn portions of our yard removed and replaced with xeriscaping that is more appropriate for a High Desert environment. We would have done this whether we were paid or not, because we definitely felt the need to reduce our water consumption as well as take advantage of the simultaneous reduction in lawn maintenance.  Being reimbursed with a credit per square foot on our water/sewer bills, accelerated this process.

Cities in New Mexico are not alone in offering incentives to remove residential grass lawns. The following list identifies many of the places in the American West that reimburse residents for converting their non-native, excessive water-consuming grass lawn to more appropriate xeriscaping. To this retired urban planner, it’s unfortunate that grass lawns were installed in the first place. However, monetary incentives are an excellent way to reduce water consumption, and in those areas affected by drought, ease pressure on existing water resources. Such a change to native, water-wise landscaping will also help lower your water bill and may eliminate the need for owning a lawn mower, grass trimmer, or lawn edger.

Source: phgmag.com

Each of these places should be commended for their efforts, while those offering no such program are missing a great opportunity to conserve water resources. The longer they delay the inevitable, the more it will cost these communities in the long run.

Source: kingnurserytx.com

If you live in one of these areas or an unlisted one that offers similar rebates, please consider removing your grass lawn and replacing it with native landscaping that is more appropriate for the local environment. If your community does not offer such a program, consider contacting them to add one.

Please note – these programs can change from time-to-time due to funding availability, timing, and other constraints. Specific requirements and restrictions also apply to each program, so please check with your community for more details before starting your grass removal project. Additional information is available via the URL link on each listing and through the website links listed under “Sources” at the bottom of this post.

Source: trendir.com

FYI – not all programs allow artificial turf as a replacement and note that rebates over a certain dollar amount do require the filing of a W-9 form with the IRS. Please check with your local community on these items and any other regulations which may apply.

As always, any additions, corrections, or suggestions to this post are most welcome. The list is not meant to be comprehensive, but is intended to be for informational purposes. The data provided below is based on the websites visited prior to publishing this post for single-family residential properties. On many of these sites, additional rebate information is available for HOA’s, multiple-family, and commercial/non-residential properties. The rebates offered and the availability of these various programs may change at any time. Happy xeriscaping! Peace.

Source: envionmentaldesigns.com

ARIZONA

Buckeye = $100 for 200-499 square feet converted and $200 for 500 square feet or more converted

Bullhead City = 75% rebate up to $5,000 for grass to artificial turf conversion and 75% rebate up to $2,500 for grass to xeriscape conversion

Chandler = $200 for installing low-water use plants in new construction and $200 per 1,000 square feet converted to xeriscaping (minimum of 1,000 square feet required)

Flagstaff = 0.25 cents per square foot converted to xeriscaping

Glendale = rebates of $150 to $750 depending on the extent of lawn replacement – minimum of 500 square feet required

Mesa = $575 for replacing a minimum of 500 square feet with xeriscaping

Peoria = up to $1,650 depending on the area converted to xeriscaping – minimum of 500 square feet required

Prescott = 0.50 cents per square foot converted to xeriscaping

Scottsdale = $2.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of $5,000

Surprise = up to $200 total for converted grass lawn to xeriscaping – minimum area of 500 square feet

Tempe = 0.25 cents per square foot converted to xeriscaping, except for the strip between the sidewalk and street which is $1.00 per square foot converted

CALIFORNIA

Alameda County Water District (Fremont, Newark, and Union City) = $2.00 per square foot converted up to a maximum of $3,000

Bakersfield = $3 per square foot (250 to 1,500 square feet) converted to water-wise landscapes

Coachella Valley Water District (Cathedral City, La Quinta, Palm Desert, and Rancho Mirage) = $3.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping for a minimum of 200 square feet and up to a maximum of 10,000 square feet

Contra Costa Water District (Concord, Antioch, etc.)= $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of 1,000 square feet

Cotati = $1.50 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of 500 square feet (or $750)

Desert Water Agency (Palm Springs) = $3.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping – a maximum is not listed on the website, but additional information is required for more than 20,000 square feet

East Bay Municipal Utility District (Oakland, Berkeley, etc.) = $1.25 to $2.50 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of $2,000 over a two-year period

Fresno = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of 1,500 square feet

Heraldsburg = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping

Long Beach = $3.00 per square foot converted to xeriscape in the front yard and $2.00 per square foot converted in the back yard up to a maximum of 5,000 square feet total. Also, a landscape design rebate of up to $1,500 is available

Marina Coast Water District (Marina, Seaside, and Fort Ord) = $1.00 per square foot of lawn converted to xeriscaping plus 0.50 cents per square foot of sprinkler conversions to drip irrigation up to a combined total of $2,000

Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (Greater Los Angeles Region) = $1.00 to $5.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping depending on the community/service area – minimum 250 square feet and a maximum of 5,000 square feet

Mission Springs Water District (Desert Hot Springs) = $2.00 per square foot converted to xeriscape up to a maximum of $3,000

Modesto = $3.00 per square foot converted to xeriscape put to a maximum of $3,000

Municipal Water District of Orange County (Orange County) = up to $3.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping – minimum 250 square feet and maximum of 5,000 square feet

North Marin Water District (Novato) = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of $800

Riverside = $5.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to 1,000 square feet and then $2.00 per square foot converted from 1,001 to 5,000 square feet converted

Sacramento = $1.50 per square foot converted to xeriscape up to a maximum of $3,000

San Bernardino = $2.00 per square foot converted to xeriscape up to a maximum of $400

San Diego County (Most municipal agencies in the county) = $2.00 or more per square foot converted to xeriscape on up to 5,000 square feet

San Luis Obispo County (Nipomo Mesa Water Conservation Area or the Paso Robles Groundwater Basin) = maximum rebate of $6,000 per property – minimum 500 square foot area converted

Santa Clara – $4.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to 1,000 square feet and $2.00 per square foot converted after that up to a maximum of $5,000

Santa Clara Valley Water District (San Jose and much of Santa Clara County) = $2.00 per square foot converted up to a maximum rebate of $3,000

Santa Clarita Valley Water Agency (Santa Clarita, Valencia, and Newhall) = $3.00 per square foot converted to xeriscape with a minimum of 100 square feet per phase and a maximum of 2,500 square feet per phase

Santa Cruz = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscape up to a maximum of $1,000

Santa Rosa = $1.50 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of $1,500 (increased from 0.75 cents per square foot in July 2021)

Scotts Valley = $2.00 per square foot converted xeriscaping

Sonoma = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a $1,000 maximum

St. Helena = $1.50 per square foot converted to xeriscape up to a maximum of $750

Valley of the Moon Water District (Sonoma Valley) = 0.50 cents per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of $400

Windsor = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of $1,500

Zone 7 Water Agency (Livermore, Pleasanton, Dublin, and San Ramon) = up to 50% of the cost to convert to xeriscaping – maximum rebate of $2,000

COLORADO

Aurora = 500 square foot minimum with a maximum rebate of $4,000 over two years

Broomfield = $1.00 per square foot converted up to 500 square feet

Centennial Water & Sanitation District (Highlands Ranch area) = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping

Erie = $2.00 per square foot converted – 200 square foot minimum/1,000 square foot maximum

Fort Collins = 0.75 cents per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to 1,000 square feet, plus 0.25 cents per square foot converted to 80% native plants to Colorado for up to 1,000 square feet for a maximum of $1,000

Greeley = $1.00 per square foot converted for areas between 500 and 2,000 square feet

Lafayette = lawn removal service offered by the city through Resource Central at $2.25 per square foot with discounts available to as low as $1.00 per square foot. A 200 square foot minimum is required.

Louisville = lawn removal service offered by the city through Resource Central at $2.25 per square foot with discounts available to as low as $1.00 per square foot. A 200 square foot minimum is required.

Thornton = up to $2.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping

IDAHO

Moscow = $150 for those who convert at least 300 square feet to Wisecape.

KANSAS

Hays = $1.00 per square foot of cool-season irrigated turf grass converted to deep-rooted, drought-tolerant warm-season grass or landscaping up to a maximum of $3,000 – a 100 square foot minimum is required

MONTANA

Bozeman = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscape – minimum 100 square feet and maximum of 2,000 square feet

NEBRASKA

Lincoln = certain expenses are reimbursable for creating a waterwise lawn using deep-rooted native grasses and improving soil conditions

NEVADA

Southern Nevada Water Authority (Las Vegas Area) = $3.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to 10,000 square feet and $1.50 per square foot beyond that

South Tahoe Public Utility District (South Lake Tahoe) = $1.50 per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to a maximum of $3,000

NEW MEXICO

Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (Albuquerque and Bernalillo County) = $2.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping

New Mexico American Water (Clovis) = 0.40 cents per square foot converted to xeriscaping for areas of 500 to 2,000 square feet

Gallup = 0.25 cents per square foot converted to xeriscaping up to 4,000 square feet – minimum of 100 square feet required

Rio Rancho = $1.00 per square foot converted to xeriscaping – minimum of 250 square feet required

OREGON

Ashland = $1.25 per square foot converted to xeriscaping for the first 1,000 square feet, then $1.00 per square foot up to 2,000 square feet, and $0.75 per square foot to a maximum of 3,000 square feet

TEXAS

Austin = up to $1,750 per property (lifetime limit) – $35 per 100 square feet converted to a WaterWise landscape, with a 500 square foot minimum

New Braufels = $1.00 per square foot converted up to a maximum of $2,000 per fiscal year

San Antonio = offered through Garden Style San Antonio at $1.50 per square foot converted from turf grass – 200 square foot minimum and maximum of $1,000 rebate

Sunset Valley = $20 per 100 square feet for native beds; $30 per 100 square feet for non-irrigated areas; and $10 per 100 square feet of native grass – minimum of 500 square feet for each

UTAH

Central Utah Water Conservancy District (Salt Lake City, Provo-Orem, etc.) = $1.25 per square foot converted to xeriscaping in the grass strip between the sidewalk and street

Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District (West Jordan, Taylorsville, Draper, etc.) = $1.25 per square foot converted to xeriscaping in the grass strip between the sidewalk and street

Weber Basin Conservancy District (Ogden, Layton, Roy, etc.) = $1.25 per square foot converted to xeriscaping in the grass strip between the sidewalk and street

WASHINGTON

Pullman = $150 for those who convert at least 300 square feet to xeriscape

Spokane = up to $500 for converting to xeriscaping

_______

If the subjects of xeriscaping and drought-tolerant landscaping interest you, here are two books available through Amazon.com.*

Link – Xeriscape
Link – WaterWise

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using the above links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in Advocacy, cities, civics, climate, climate change, culture, deserts, ecosystems, environment, geography, government, health, Housing, infrastructure, land use, landscape architecture, natural history, nature, planning, rivers/watersheds, Statistics, sustainability, topography, urban planning, water, water conservation, xeriscaping | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Most populous suburban indigenous pueblos/reservations in the United States

Source: osagenews.org

The list below identifies the most populous indigenous pueblos and reservations located in suburban parts of metropolitan areas. A minimum population of 500 residents living within the pueblo/reservation was required for inclusion in this list (FYI – not all residents are necessarily indigenous). In a few instances, if the pueblo/reservation was situated in a very remote and rural edge of a metropolitan area, it was not included. Albuquerque leads the list with nine (9) suburban pueblos/reservations, followed by Phoenix and Santa Fe with four (4) each, and Palm Springs with three (3).

Isleta Pueblo, New Mexico – Source: newmexico.org
  1. Puyallup Reservation, WA – Tacoma, Washington = 54,416

2. Osage Reservation, OK – Tulsa, Oklahoma = 45,818

3. Yakama Nation Reservation, WA – Yakima, Washington = 31,591

4. Flathead Reservation, MT – Missoula, Montana = 27,282

5. Oneida Reservation, WI – Green Bay, Wisconsin = 27,110

6. Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, CA – Palm Springs, California = 27,090

7. Nez Perce Reservation, ID – Lewiston, Idaho = 18,403

8. Gila River Indian Reservation, AZ – Phoenix, Arizona = 14,053

9. Southern Ute Reservation, CO – Durango, Colorado = 12,321

10. Tulalip Reservation, WA – Seattle, Washington = 10,969

11. Coeur d’Alene Reservation, ID – Spokane, Washington = 7,567

12. Salt River Reservation, AZ – Phoenix, Arizona = 7,486

13. Tohono O’odham Nation Reservation, AZ – Tucson, Arizona = 7,468

14. Crow Reservation, MT – Billings, Montana = 6,680

15. Sandia Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 4,738

16. Suquamish Reservation, WA – Bremerton, Washington = 4,266

17. Fond du Lac Reservation, MN – Duluth, Minnesota = 4,184

18. San Felipe Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 3,686

19. Torres-Martinez Reservation, CA – Palm Springs, California = 3,454

20. Isleta Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 3,376

21. Catawba Reservation, SC – Charlotte, North Carolina = 3,370

22. Fort Hall Northern Shoshone Reservation, ID – Pocatello, Idaho = 3,195

23. Santo Domingo Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 3,160

24. Nambe Pueblo, NM – Santa Fe, New Mexico = 1,970 (2021 est.)

25. Jemez Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 1,963

26. Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, NV – Reno-Sparks, Nevada = 1,933

27. Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, CA, AZ – Yuma, Arizona = 1,898

28. San Ildefonso Pueblo, NM – Santa Fe, New Mexico = 1,819

29. Fort Mojave Indian Reservation, AZ, XCA, NV – Las Vegas, Nevada = 1,697

30. Pala Reservation, CA – San Diego, California = 1,541

31. Pueblo de Cochiti, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 1,517

32. Ohkay Owingeh Reservation, NM – Santa Fe, New Mexico = 1,464

33. Morongo Indian Reservation, CA – Palm Springs, California = 1,243

34. Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation Reservation, AZ – Phoenix, Arizona = 1,152

35. Maricopa Ak Chin Indian Reservation, AZ – Phoenix, Arizona = 1,070

36. Port Gamble Tribal Community, WA – Bremerton, Washington = 1,010

37. Cocopah Indian Reservation, AZ – Yuma, Arizona = 857

38. Zia Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 760

39. Laguna Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 737

40. Skokomish Reservation, WA – Olympia-Lacey, Washington = 724

41. Santa Ana Pueblo, NM – Albuquerque, New Mexico = 684

42. Nisqually Reservation, WA – Olympia-Lacey, Washington = 639

Cahuilla Reservations in the Palm Springs area – Source: aaanativearts.com

________

If indigenous communities such as pueblos and reservations interest you, here are two books on the topic that are available through Amazon.com.*

Link – Rez Life
Link – Pueblo Nations

*A small commission is earned from purchases that are made using the above links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

SOURCES:

Posted in Cities, civics, culture, demographics, diversity, geography, government, history, land use, Maps, Native Americans, place names, planning, spatial design, Statistics, toponymy | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Highest mountain passes, gaps, cuts, notches, and saddles on the Interstate Highway System

Source: uncovercolorado.com

Below is a list of the highest elevation mountain passes, gaps, cuts, notches, and saddles in the United States on the Interstate Highway System. This blog author has traveled through the ones that are shown in italics. The list represents 24 states and 31 different interstate highways. Interstates with the most examples are:

  • I-80 = 12
  • I-40 = 10
  • I-5 and I-15 = 8 each
    • I-8 and I-90 = 7 each
  • I-75 = 6
  • I-10 and I-70 = 5 each
  • I-25 = 4

There are likely additional highways cuts that should be added to this list, but are more difficult to find as they are human made, so they do not show up on the USGS database. Please feel free to pass along additional information on any passes, gaps, cuts, notches, or saddles that were not included. Peace!

Vail Pass – Source: codot.gov
  1. Vail Pass, Colorado = 10,662 on I-70

2. Emigrant Pass, Utah = 7,907 feet on I-70

3. Raton Pass, New Mexico/Colorado = 7,835 feet on I-25

4. Glorieta Pass, New Mexico = 7,500 feet on I-25

5. Quealy Gap, Wyoming = 7,464 feet on I-80

6. Monument Hill Pass, Colorado = 7,352 feet on I-25

7. Campbell Pass, New Mexico = 7,270 feet on I-40

8. Donner Summit Pass (a.k.a Euer Saddle), California = 7,241 feet on I-80

9. Parleys Summit Pass, Utah = 7,120 feet on I-80

10. Tijeras Pass, New Mexico = 7,040 feet on I-40

11. Pequop Summit Pass, Nevada = 6,960 feet on I-80

12. Monida Pass, Idaho = 6,821 feet on I-15

13. Elk Park Pass, Montana = 6,368 feet on I-15

14. Homestake Pass, Montana = 6,365 feet on I-90

15. Puerto del Sol Gap, New Mexico = 6,342 feet on I-25

16. Cedar Pass, Nevada = 6,168 feet on I-80

17. Cove Fort Dog Valley Pass, Utah = 6,158 feet on I-15

18. Emigrant Pass, Nevada = 6,114 feet on I-80

19. Scipio Pass, Utah = 6,004 feet on I-15

20. Deer Lodge Pass, Montana = 5,902 feet on I-15

21. Silver Zone Pass, Nevada = 5,883 feet on I-80

22. Yuba Gap, California = 5,791 feet on I-80

23. Bozeman Pass, Montana = 5,702 feet on I-90

I-90 passing thru Bozeman Pass, MT- Source: bozemanet.com

24. Rattlesnake Pass, Utah = 5,312 feet on I-84

25. Emigrant Gap, California = 5,227 feet on I-80

26. Golconda Summit Pass, Nevada = 5,144 feet on I-80

27. Lookout Pass, Montana/Idaho = 4,725 on I-90

28. Mountain Pass, California = 4,650 feet +/- on I-15

29. Siskayou Pass, Oregon = 4,465 feet on I-5

30. Railroad Pass, Arizona = 4,403 feet on I-10

31. Wendover Cut, Utah = 4,400 feet +/- on I-80

32. Cajon Pass, California = 4,288 feet on I-15

33. Crestwood Summit Pass, California = 4,181 feet on I-8

34. Tejon Pass, California = 4,144 feet on I-5

35. Tecate Divide Pass, California = 4,140 feet on I-8

36. Carpenter Summit Pass, California = 4,078 feet on I-8

37. Laguna Summit Pass, California = 4,055 feet on I-8

38. Tehachapi Pass, California = 3,793 feet on a future segment of I-40

39. Sams Gap, North Carolina = 3,767 feet on I-26

40. El Paso del Norte, Texas = 3,740 feet on I-10

41. Deadman Pass, Oregon = 3,606 feet 0n I-84

42. Mill Creek Gap, Georgia = 3,461 feet on I-75

43. Fourth of July Pass, Montana = 3,428 on I-90

44. Grapevine Pass, Utah = 3,199 feet on I-15

45. Snoqualmie Pass, Washington = 3,005 feet on I-90

46-47. – tie Coleman Gap, North Carolina = 2,782 feet on I-40 &

Vanderbilt Gap, Washington = 2,782 feet on I-82

48. South Pass, California = 2,608 feet on I-40

49. Laurel Hill Cut, Pennsylvania = 2,603 feet on I-70/76

50. Violin Summit Pass, California = 2,575 feet on I-5

51. Railroad Pass, Nevada = 2,359 feet on I-11

52. Rocky Gap, Virginia = 2,077 feet on I-77

53. Canyon Creek Pass, Oregon = 2,020 feet on I-5

54. Sexton Mountain Pass, Oregon = 1,962 feet on I-5

55. Rockfish Gap, Virginia = 1,900 feet on I-64

56. Howard Gap, North Carolina = 1,857 feet on I-26

57. Stage Road Pass, Oregon = 1,830 feet on I-5

58. Picacho Pass, Arizona = 1,801 feet on I-10

59. Newhall Pass, California = 1,755 feet on I-5

60. Crab Orchard Gap, Tennessee = 1,752 on I-40

61. Sideling Hill Cut, Pennsylvania = 1,738 feet +/- on I-76

62. Chiraco Summit Pass, California = 1,705 on I-10

63. Plomosa Pass, Arizona = 1,641 feet on I-10

64. San Gorgonio Pass, California = 1,591 feet on I-10

65. Bruce Gap, Tennessee = 1,352 feet on I-75

66. Sideling Hill Cut, Maryland = 1,280 feet on I-68

67. Indian Gap, Tennessee = 1,247 feet on I-75

68. Jacksonville Pass, Wisconsin = 1,201 feet on I-90

69-70. – tie Clear Ridge Cut, Pennsylvania = 1,200 feet +/- on I-70/76

Paint Mountain Cut, West Virginia = 1,200 feet +/- on I-64/77

Paint Mountain Cut (right) bypassing former Memorial Tunnel (left) in WV – Source bridgehunter.com

71. Sepulveda Pass, California = 1,130 feet on I-405

72-73. – tie Sharp Gap, Tennessee = 1,047 feet on I-275 &

Sugar Notch, Pennsylvania = 1,047 feet on I-81

74. Green Gap, Tennessee, 974 feet on I-75

75. Roberts Mountain Pass, Oregon = 965 feet on I-5

76. Union Gap, Washington = 942 feet on I-82

77. Manassas Gap, Virginia = 938 feet on I-66

78. Weems Gap, Alabama = 909 feet on I-20

79. The [Missionary] Ridge Cut, Tennessee = 900 feet +/- on I-24

80. Sadler Gap, Alabama = 899 feet on I-59

81. Moore Gap, Tennessee = 896 feet on I-75

82-83. – tie Brooks Gap, Tennessee = 860 feet on I-75 &

Goose Gap, Washington = 860 feet on I-182

84. Diggs Gap, Tennessee = 846 feet on I-75

85. Hope Gap, Tennessee = 840 feet on I-40

86. Red Mountain Cut, Alabama = 800 feet +/- on I-65

87. Curtin Gap, Pennsylvania = 791 feet on I-80

88. Telegraph Pass, Arizona = 787 feet on I-8

89. Karr Gap, Alabama = 738 feet on I-20

90. Atchinsons Gap, Tennessee = 719 feet on I-65

91. Hayward’s Pass, California = 699 feet on I-580

92. Mission Pass, California = 662 feet on I-680

93. Jenny Jump Mountain Cut, New Jersey = 660 feet +/- on I-80

94-95. – tie Deneen Gap, Pennsylvania = 646 feet on I-70 &

Tucker Gap, Tennessee = 646 feet on I-40

96. Eucalyptus Pass, California = 640 feet on I-8

97. Owens Gap, Alabama = 568 feet on I-459

98-99. – tie. Coryell Pass, Oregon = 515 feet on I-5

Owens Gap, Alabama = 568 feet on I-459

100. Buffalo Gap, Tennessee = 512 feet on I-40

101. Mohawk Pass, Arizona = 499 feet on I-8

102. Thoroughfare Gap, Virginia = 436 feet on I-66

103-104. – tie. Cadron Gap, Arkansas = 433 feet on I-40 &

Swatara Gap, Pennsylvania = 433 feet on I-81

105. Delaware Water Gap, New Jersey/Pennsylvania = 335 feet on I-80

106. Bush Notch, Massachusetts = 308 feet on I-90

107. Cooks Gap, Connecticut = 233 feet on I-84

Sideling Hill Cut, Maryland – Source: gribblenation.com

*Highway elevations area estimated (using +/-) based on USGS maps when the exact elevation is unknown.

*When elevations vary between the N/S or E/W bound lanes, the higher elevation is used for this list.

SOURCES:

Posted in Cars, environment, fun, geography, Geology, infrastructure, land use, mountains, natural history, nature, place names, recreation, scenic byways, spatial design, States, Statistics, topography, toponymy, tourism, transportation, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Twelve planning lessons from failing cities

There are likely many more planning-related lessons from failing cities that could have been added, but these are ones that initially came to mind. Any additions, suggestions, or corrections are welcome.

Source: dreamstime.com

Do NOT chase the latest fad project without doing your homework. Cities across the country are littered with closed downtown malls, underutilized sports arenas and stadiums, stacks of unused rental/free scooters, as well as a myriad of other “fad” ideas that were meant to help revitalize the city. Don’t go there just for the sake of keeping up with other cities. Do your homework first and if it is not right for your community do not waste time and resources pursuing it.

“Don’t go there [chasing fad ideas] just for the sake of keeping up with other cities.”

Source: panethos.wordpress.com

Remove blight as quickly as you can. Nothing will make a city look depressed faster than blight.

Seek support and funds to remove harmful freeways. A scaring freeway that tears through your once-thriving neighborhoods is another form of blight.

“A scaring freeway that tears through your once-thriving neighborhoods is another form of blight.”

Source: panethos.wordpress.com

Seek projects that fill voids in the community and that promote health – grocers, pharmacies, community gardens, parks, and athletic/fitness facilities are five examples.

Do not approve projects just for the sake of getting new development. Unfortunately, there are predatory land uses out there and they do little to help your citizens. Similarly, there are industrial uses that can be very polluting. Be thoughtful and mindful of the potential consequences from proposed projects.

“Be thoughtful and mindful of the potential consequences from proposed projects.”

Source: panethos.wordpress.com

Work closely with non-profits and NGOs (non-government organizations) to help achieve and attain goals. They offer skillsets and talent that your city may not be able to afford on its own.

Consider revamping your Master Plan and Zoning Ordinance in ways that would encourage new investment, facilitate adaptive reuse of existing structures, and create desirable redevelopment. Few things harm a city’s collective identity more than the loss of historic structures to neglect and/or redevelopment.

Accelerate the approval process with imaginative ideas. While NOT a failing city, South Bend, Indiana’s recent step of pre-approved housing templates is a great way of accelerating the process without cutting the quality of design.

Clearing sites and turning them into parking craters in your core city is bad karma. An overabundance of surface parking lots is not good for the health of your downtown and can contribute towards harming the cohesiveness there.

Eliminate minutia from your code(s). This does not mean rescinding your code or making the city less safe/healthy, but there are aspects of every code that are contradictory, overwritten, over-detailed, and over-regulatory which can be removed or re-written.

“…there are aspects of every code that are contradictory, overwritten, over-detailed, and over-regulatory which can be removed or re-written.”

Source: panethos.wordpress.com

Get the city’s financial house in order. A city on the precipice of insolvency hardly has the consistent funds to help turn it around.

If the city isn’t working or has become dysfunctional, stop electing the same people!

Posted in Active transportation, adaptive reuse, business, Cars, cities, civics, civility, commerce, culture, downtown, economic development, environment, fitness, food systems, geography, government, health, Health care, Highway displacement, highways, historic preservation, history, Housing, human rights, humanity, inclusiveness, industry, infrastructure, land use, nature, new urbanism, placemaking, planning, politics, recreation, revitalization, Small business, spatial design, sustainability, third places, tourism, traffic, transportation, Travel, urban planning, visual pollution, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

North American island, ile, isle(a), or key cities/towns

Ain’t no waterbody here in mid-Nebraska – Source: kearneyhub.com

The following list identifies those cities and towns named with the terms island, isle, isle, or key. The list includes those that are actual islands or an inland city with “island” as part of its name. In fact, Grand Island, Nebraska and Blue Island, Illinois are two such examples of inland cities with “island” in their name.

One area that could use more information for this list are cities/towns in Mexico. And, for some odd reason, neither Fantasy Island nor Gilligan’s Island could be found. 😉 As always, any additions, corrections, or suggestions are welcome. Peace!

  • Aaron Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Allan’s Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Anderson Island, Washington
  • Anthony Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Anvil Island, British Columbia
  • Apollo Key, Florida
  • Baccalieu Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Bainbridge Island, Washington
  • Bald Head Island, North Carolina
  • Bard Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Barnston Island, British Columbia
  • Barnum Island, New York
  • Barren Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Bay Harbor Islands, Florida
  • Bayside Key, Florida
  • Beech Island, South Carolina
  • Belle Isle, Florida
  • Belle Isle, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Big Coppitt Key, Florida
  • Big Island, Nova Scotia
  • Big Island Landing, Manitoba
  • Big Pine Key, Florida
  • Big Torch Key, Florida
  • Birch Island, British Columbia
  • Black Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Blakely Island, Washington
  • Blue Island, Illinois
  • Boca Chica Key, Florida
  • Bow Island, Alberta
  • Bowen Island, British Columbia
  • Broomes Island, Maryland
  • Burnt Islands, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Campbell Island, British Columbia
  • Campobello Island, New Brunswick
  • Candlewood Isle, Connecticut
  • Cape Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Cape Isle of Wight, Maryland
  • Capstan Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Caribbean Key, Florida
  • Caribou Island, Nova Scotia
  • Catawba Island, Ohio
  • Cedar Key, Florida
  • Cedar Island, North Carolina
  • Change Islands, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Christian Island, Ontario
  • Christmas Island, Nova Scotia
  • Clark Island, Maine
  • Cobb Island, Maryland
  • Conch Key, Florida
  • Cousins Island, Maine
  • Cudjoe Key, Florida
  • Daufuskie Island, South Carolina
  • Dauphin Island, Alabama
  • Deal Island, Maryland
  • Deer Isle, Maine
  • Denman Island, British Columbia
  • Drummond Island, Michigan
  • Duck Key, Florid
  • Durells Island, Nova Scotia
  • Dutch Island, Georgia
  • Elk Island, Alberta
  • Emerald Isle, North Carolina
  • Fire Island, New York
  • Fisher Island, Florida
  • Fishers Island, New York
  • Five Islands, Nova Scotia
  • Flat Islands, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Flowers Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Fox Island (2), Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Fox Island, Nova Scotia
  • French Island, Wisconsin
  • Frenchman’s Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Geiger Key, Florida
  • Gibson Island, Maryland
  • Gooseberry Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Grand Island, Florida
  • Grand Island, Nebraska
  • Grand Island, New York
  • Grand Isle, Louisiana
  • Green Island, Iowa
  • Green Island, New York
  • Green Island Cove, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Green Isle, Minnesota
  • Grosse Ile, Michigan
  • Grosse, Isle, Manitoba
  • Harbor Isle, New York
  • Half Island Cove, Nova Scotia
  • Harkers Island, North Carolina
  • Harstine Island, Washington
  • Hat Island, Washington
  • Heckmans Island, Nova Scotia
  • Herron Island, Washington
  • High Island, Texas
  • Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
  • Nornby Island, British Columbia
  • Hutchinson Island South, Florida
  • Île-à-Vache, Haiti
  • Île de la Tortue, Haiti
  • Isla, Mexico
  • Isla Aguada, Mexico
  • Islamorada, Florida
  • Island Brook, Quebec
  • Island Cache, British Columbia
  • Island East River, Nova Scotia
  • Island Falls, Saskatchewan
  • Island Grove, Florida
  • Island Harbour, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Islandia, Florida
  • Islandia, New York
  • Island Park, New York
  • Island Point, Nova Scotia
  • Islandton, South Carolina
  • Island View, Nova Scotia
  • Island View Saskatchewan
  • Island Walk, Florida
  • Isla Mujeres, Mexico
  • Isla Vista, California
  • Isle, Minnesota
  • Isle aux Morts, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Isle La Motte, Vermont
  • Isle of Hope, Georgia
  • Isle of Palms, South Carolina
  • Isle of Skye, Quebec
  • Isle of St. George, Ohio
  • Isle Pierre, British Columbia
  • Isleta Pueblo, New Mexico
  • Isleworth, Florida
  • James Island, South Carolina
  • Joe Batt’s Arm-Barr’d Islands-Shoal Bay, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Johns Island, South Carolina
  • Jupiter Island, Florida
  • Jupiter Island, Ontario
  • Keats Island, British Columbia
  • Kelleys Island, Ohio
  • Ketron Island, Washington
  • Key Biscayne, Florida
  • Key Colony Beach, Florida
  • Key Haven, Florida
  • Key Largo, Florida
  • Key Vista, Florida
  • Key West, Florida
  • Kiawah Island, South Carolina
  • Knotts Island, North Carolina
  • Lenox Island, Prince Edward Island
  • L’Isle-aux-Allumettes, Quebec
  • L’Isle-aux-Coudres, Quebec
  • L’Isle-aux-Grues, Quebec
  • L’Île-Cadieux, Quebec
  • L’Île-Dorval, Quebec
  • L’Ile-Perrot, Quebec
  • L’Isle-Verte, Quebec
  • L’Isle-Verte-Ouest, Quebec
  • Little Deer Isle, Maine
  • Littlejohn Island, Maine
  • Little Torch Key, Florida
  • Lois Key, Florida
  • Longboat Key, Florida
  • Mackinac Island, Michigan
  • Manasota Key, Florida
  • Marco Island, Florida
  • Matheson Island, Manitoba
  • Matlacha Isles-Matlacha Shores, Florida
  • Mayne Island, British Columbia
  • McNutts Island, Nova Scotia
  • Mercer Island, Washington
  • Merritt Island, Florida
  • Minstrel Island, British Columbia
  • Mystic Island, New Jersey
  • No Name Key, Florida
  • Northeastern Manitoulin and the Islands, Ontario
  • North Key Largo, Florida
  • Notre-Dame-de-l’Île-Perrot, Quebec
  • Notre-Dame-de-l’Isle-Verte, Quebec
  • Nottingham Island, Nunavut
  • Oak Island, North Carolina
  • Oak Island, Texas
  • Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina
  • Padloping Island, Nunavut
  • Panmure Island, Prince Edward Island
  • Parris Island, South Carolina
  • Pass Island Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Pawleys Island, South Carolina
  • Pelee Island, Ontario
  • Pender Isladn, British Columbia
  • Perdido Key, Florida
  • Petite-Rivière-de-I’lle, New Brunswick
  • Pilley’s Island, Ontario
  • Pine Island (2), Florida
  • Pine Island Center, Florida
  • Plantation Island, Florida
  • Popponesset Island, Massachusetts
  • Porcher Island, British Columbia
  • Port Hood Island, Nova Scotia
  • Presquille, Louisiana
  • Presque Isle, Maine
  • Presque Isle, Michigan
  • Presque Isle Harbor, Michigan
  • Puget Island, Washington
  • Ralls Island, Manitoba
  • Ramrod Key, Florida
  • Read Island, British Columbia
  • Rear Christmas Island, Nova Scotia
  • Red Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Resolution Island, Nunavut
  • Robert’s Island, Nova Scotia
  • Rock Island, Illinois
  • Rockland Key, Florida
  • Round Island, Nova Scotia
  • Saddlebuch Keys, Florida
  • Saddle Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Sailor’s Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Saint George Island, Maryland
  • Saint Helena Island, South Carolina
  • Salpelo Island, Georgia
  • Samson Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Scatarie Island, Nova Scotia
  • Seabrook Island, South Carolina
  • Sea Island, Georgia
  • Sea Isle City, New Jersey
  • Seal Island, Nova Scotia
  • Seconsett Island, Massachusetts
  • Sept-Iles, Quebec
  • Shark Key, Florida
  • Shelter Island, New York
  • Shelter Island Heights, New York
  • Sherose Island, Nova Scotia
  • Ship Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Siesta Key, Florida
  • Skidaway Island, Georgia
  • Sober Island, Nova Scotia
  • South Padre Island, Texas
  • Spencers Island, Nova Scotia
  • Spotted Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Staten Island Borough, New York
  • Stock Island, Florida
  • Stoney Island, Nova Scotia
  • Strongs Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Stuart Island, British Columbia
  • Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina
  • Summerland Key, Florida
  • Sunny Isles Beach, Florida
  • Surettes Island, Nova Scotia
  • Talahi Island, Georgia
  • Tancook Island, Nova Scotia
  • Tar Island, Alberta
  • Taylors Island, Maryland
  • Thetis Island, British Columbia
  • Thousand Island Park, New York
  • Tilghman Island, Maryland
  • Treasure Island, Florida
  • Tybee Island, Georgia
  • Upper Island Cove, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Upper Sugarloaf Key, Florida
  • Wadmalaw Island, South Carolina
  • Walpole Island, Ontario
  • Whidbey Island Station, Washington
  • White Island, Ontario
  • White Island Shores, Massachusetts
  • Whitemarsh Island, Georgia
  • Wilmington Island, Georgia
  • Woody Island, Newfoundland & Labrador
  • Yonges Island, South Carolina

SOURCES:

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