Tag Archives: housing

Surviving Clusters of Shotgun Houses


The shotgun house, or shotgun shack is an easily recognizable long and narrow residential dwelling style that was most commonly constructed┬áin the Deep South and along/near the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys in the decades between the end of the … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, Africa, architecture, art, cities, culture, density, diversity, economics, geography, historic preservation, history, homelessness, Housing, humanity, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, placemaking, planning, revitalization, spatial design, Statistics, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Homelessness in paradise


 Since moving to Traverse City approximately six months ago we have observed a number of political and planning issues that are fairly common in larger cities, but which have percolated to the surface here more recently as the region has … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, Advocacy, cities, civics, civility, demographics, economics, health, homelessness, Housing, human rights, humanity, infrastructure, land use, Love, planning, politics, poverty, social equity, Statistics, unemployment, urban planning | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Is there a student housing bubble and is it about to burst?


For many collegiate cities and towns across the United States, the steady influx of international students (and often with their families), from primarily China/Asia, have lifted the local real estate markets out of the post-2008 doldrums. The concern now becomes … Continue reading

Posted in Asia, China, cities, colleges, culture, demographics, diversity, economic development, education, geography, globalization, Housing, humanity, immigration, land use, marketing, new urbanism, placemaking, planning, Statistics, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Unofficial guide to hipsterhoods of the Mountain West


For this post, my definition of Mountain West includes the states of Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. College towns that are largely hipster havens are listed without specific neighborhoods unless they have been identified during … Continue reading

Posted in adaptive reuse, architecture, art, beer, bicycling, Biking, branding, brewpubs, cities, coffee shops/cafes, colleges, commerce, Cuisine, culture, diversity, downtown, economic development, entertainment, entrepreneurship, Food, fun, geography, historic preservation, history, Housing, inclusiveness, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, placemaking, planning, revitalization, Small business, social equity, sustainability, third places, tourism, transportation, Travel, urban planning, walking, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

A new tower to rise in Boston


Below is an artist’s rendering of the new mixed use skyscraper planned for the Back Bay district of Boston. The 58 story, 691 foot triangular-shaped building will contain both condominiums and a hotel, making it the tallest residential building in … Continue reading

Posted in architecture, cities, density, downtown, economic development, Economy, geography, Housing, infrastructure, land use, new urbanism, North America, pictures, placemaking, planning, product design, revitalization, skylines, spatial design, Statistics, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cities with the best 2013 rental occupancy rates in the USA


Here is a newly released list by Multifamily Executive magazine of the 10 American metropolitan areas with highest multiple-family housing occupancy rates in 2013.┬áIt is interesting to note that only one of these urban areas is situated in the Western … Continue reading

Posted in cities, commerce, consumerism, culture, density, economic development, economic gardening, Economy, geography, Housing, land use, new urbanism, North America, placemaking, planning, product design, spatial design, Statistics, urban planning, zoning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

This Could Be the Start of Something Good


Recently released data from the Census Bureau indicates after 35 years of increasing average new single-family house size, there has been slight, yet noticeable drop in the average new house size in each of the past four years. It is … Continue reading

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