America’s largest mega-suburbs by land area


 The following list identifies those American suburban cities that as of late last week occupied a land area of at least 50 square miles – water area is not included in the area calculation.  Also not included are “towns” as defined in the Northeast, unincorporated places, or townships. Those metro areas with the most suburban cities represented on the list include:
Los Angeles = 15
Dallas-Fort Worth = 9
Phoenix = 8
Hampton Roads = 4
Kansas City = 4
Houston = 3
Las Vegas = 3
Oklahoma City = 3
Duluth = 2
 –
Any additions and/or corrections are most welcome.
 –
  1. Suffolk (Hampton Roads), VA = 440.2 square miles
  2. Buckeye (Phoenix), AZ = 375.3 square miles
  3. Chesapeake (Hampton Roads), VA = 340.8 square miles
  4. Virginia Beach (Hampton Roads), VA = 249.0 square miles
  5. Cusseta (Columbus), GA = 248.7 square miles
  6. Boulder City (Las Vegas), NV = 208.5 square miles
  7. California City (Bakersfield), CA = 203.5 square miles
  8. Goodyear (Phoenix), AZ =  191.5 square miles
  9. Scottsdale (Phoenix), AZ = 183.9 square miles
  10. Hibbing (Duluth), MN = 181.8 square miles
  11. Norman (Oklahoma City), OK = 178.8 square miles
  12. Peoria (Phoenix), AZ = 174.4 square miles
  13. Aurora (Denver), CO = 154.7 square miles
  14. Bunnell (Daytona Beach), FL = 137.5 square miles
  15. Mesa (Phoenix), AZ = 136.5 square miles
  16. League City (Houston), TX = 132.8 square miles
  17. Fernley (Reno), NV = 122.1 square miles
  18. Marana (Tucson), AZ = 121.5 square miles
  19. Eloy (Phoenix), AZ = 111.5 square miles
  20. Casa Grande (Phoenix), AZ = 109.7 squre miles
  21. Henderson (Las Vegas), NV = 107.5 square miles
  22. Surprise (Phoenix), AZ = 105.8 square miles
  23. Babbitt (Duluth), MN = 105.7 square miles
  24. Cape Coral (Fort Myers), FL = 105.2 square miles
  25. Palmdale (Los Angeles), CA = 105.0 square miles
  26. North Las Vegas (Las Vegas), NV = 101.4 square miles
  27. Plymouth (Boston), MA = 96.5 square miles
  28. Arlington (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 95.8 square miles
  29. Palm Springs (Los Angeles), CA = 94.2 square miles
  30. Lancaster (Los Angeles), California = 94.0 square miles
  31. Palm Coast (Jacksonville), FL = 89.9 square miles
  32. Denton (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 88.0 square miles
  33. Oak Ridge (Knoxville), TN = 85.5 square miles
  34. Edmund (Oklahoma City), OK = 85.1 square miles
  35. Port Arthur (Beaumont), TX = 82.9 square miles
  36. El Reno (Oklahoma City), OK = 80.0 square miles
  37. Independence (Kansas City, MO-KS), MO = 78.3 square miles
  38. Riverside (Los Angeles), CA = 78.1 square miles
  39. Fremont (San Francisco-Oakland), CA = 76.7 square miles
  40. Port St. Lucie (Fort Pierce), FL = 75.5 square miles
  41. Rome (Utica), NY = 74.9 square miles
  42. Northport (Sarasota-Bradenton), FL = 74.8 square miles
  43. Overland Park (Kansas City, MO-KS), KS = 74.8 square miles
  44. Rio Rancho (Albuquerque), NM = 73.4 square miles
  45. Apple Valley (Los Angeles), CA = 73.3 square miles
  46. North Charleston (Charleston), SC = 73.2 square miles
  47. Hesperia (Los Angeles), CA = 73.1 square miles
  48. Victorville (Los Angeles), CA = 72.8 square miles
  49. Plano (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 71.6 square miles
  50. Grand Prairie (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 71.4 square miles
  51. Irving, (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 67.8 square miles
  52. Wildwood (St. Louis), MO = 66.4 square miles
  53. Irvine (Los Angeles), CA = 66.1 square miles
  54. Texas City (Houston), TX = 63.8 square miles
  55. Lee’s Summit (Kansas City, MO-KS), MO = 63.4 square miles
  56. Central (Baton Rouge), LA = 62.2 square miles
  57. McKinney (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 62.2 square miles
  58. Joliet (Chicago), IL = 62.1 square miles
  59. Frisco (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 61.8 square miles
  60. Concord (Charlotte), NC = 60.3 square miles
  61. Olathe, (Kansas City, MO-KS), KS = 59.7 square miles
  62. San Bernardino (Los Angeles), CA = 59.2 square miles
  63. Twentynine Palms (Los Angeles), CA = 59.1 square miles
  64. Garland (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 57.1 square miles
  65. Adelanto (Los Angeles), CA = 56.0 square miles
  66. Murfreesboro (Nashville), TN = 55.5 square miles
  67. High Point (Greensboro-Winston-Salem), NC = 55.4 square miles
  68. Palm Beach Gardens (West Palm Beach), FL = 55.1 square miles
  69. Ventura (Los Angeles), CA = 55.0 square miles
  70. Cary (Raleigh-Durham), NC = 54.3 square miles
  71. Decatur (Huntsville), AL = 53.7 square miles
  72. Midlothian (Dallas-Fort Worth), TX = 53.7 square miles
  73. Santa Clarita (Los Angeles), CA = 52.7 square miles
  74. Conroe (Houston), TX = 52.6 square miles
  75. Hurricane (St. George), UT = 52.1 square miles
  76. Bluffton (Savannah, GA), SC = 51.3 square miles
  77. Moreno Valley (Los Angeles), CA = 51.3 square miles
  78. Hampton (Hampton Roads), Va = 51.0 square miles
  79. Gastonia (Charlotte), NC = 50.5 square miles
  80. Long Beach (Los Angeles), CA = 50.3 square miles
  81. Chattahoochee Hills (Atlanta), GA = 50.2 square miles

Sources: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_cities_by_area for most of those exceeding 70 square miles in area and en.wikipedia.org for each individual city or list of cities by state for the rest of the list.

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4 Responses to America’s largest mega-suburbs by land area

  1. What definition was used for “suburban city”? Offhand, I see many in southern California, a region I’m personally familiar with, that I would NOT call “suburbs.” Just being in the L.A. metro area doesn’t make these what I’d call “suburbs.”

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  2. Tom Wagner says:

    Suburb areal sizes may hide the real impact of suburbs on central cities. Detroit has dozens of small area suburbs that add up to an area 5-10 times the size of the City of Detroit. Each suburb competes with the others in sucking residents and economic wealth out of the urban core.

    Liked by 1 person

    • problogic says:

      I agree – Michigan’s antiquated annexation laws also tend to hurt Detroit and other core cities as their ability to expand is greatly diminished.

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      • Tom Wagner says:

        While once Detroit needed to expand beyond its civil boundaries but couldn’t because of the “home rule” suburbs, today the City wants to get smaller (having lost over a million residents) but cannot because of its suburbs. It’s locked in!

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